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Stick starting to crack near the heel, can I repair it?


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#1 louierev07

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Posted 10 October 2013 - 08:41 AM

So my one good one piece stick started to crack right on the heel. I maybe got 20 sessions out of it before it cracked, is this normal?

I think I caught it kinda early, but some water definitely got in because if I squeeze the blade in some spots it makes a crunch noise (you can hear it in video).

Any chance of repairing this stick? I've seen people use wood glue and epoxy and they said they had ok results, but I'm skeptical. Obviously I should just try it and see what happens, but I just started playing on the ice a few months ago, and might not be able to tell if the stick isn't performing how it should.

At the very least, I think the epoxy will make it ok to use for just stick handling.

Picture (before taking the tape off)
ydeI7Kd.jpg
Video


I really hope I can fix, because the way this stick is tapered, I don't think there is any chance of fitting another tapered blade in, since the dagger taper is so thin. Flipping it over is an option, but then the kick point is all messed up :/

What do you guys think? Is there any chance to save this?

Edited by louierev07, 10 October 2013 - 08:43 AM.


#2 Chadd

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Posted 10 October 2013 - 10:01 AM

If the blade is still stiff, you may be able to extend the life a little bit. However, if the blade is soft enough that it flexes easily, it won't last all that long. Any good two part epoxy should work to repair it. Just coat the crack and area around it, let it set up and then sand down any major bumps. 


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#3 louierev07

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Posted 10 October 2013 - 11:09 AM

I think it's pretty stiff for the most part, the only thing you can notice is the crunching noise if you squeeze where the crack is. I'm gonna try out either way, nothing to lose I guess.

#4 Stewie

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Posted 10 October 2013 - 11:23 AM

exactly what chadd said. I have primarily used J.B. Weld products with some pretty good results. Ive used it to fix some major cracking damage on a 6K that held me off until i upgraded, and used a bit of it to fix some damage on a nike bauer vapor xxv back in the day. Blade Durability was a huge issue with the widow line based on what ive seen in these forums, so I wouldnt be surprised. 



#5 romdj

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Posted 10 October 2013 - 12:21 PM

roll up your sleeves and get to work ;)

seriously though, stuff like jb weld are a quick and easy fix and will extend the life the stick, but if you really want to resuscitate it, I believe this is the way

http://www.youtube.c...h?v=VDX5_HReeSs

http://www.youtube.c...h?v=I3Veota59Rs



#6 Chadd

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Posted 10 October 2013 - 12:31 PM

I think it's pretty stiff for the most part, the only thing you can notice is the crunching noise if you squeeze where the crack is. I'm gonna try out either way, nothing to lose I guess.

Hold the toe in your fingers, put your thumb in the middle of the curve and see if it flexes. Once the foam breaks down enough that it loses stiffness, shooting is seriously impacted. 


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#7 louierev07

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Posted 10 October 2013 - 03:47 PM

Hold the toe in your fingers, put your thumb in the middle of the curve and see if it flexes. Once the foam breaks down enough that it loses stiffness, shooting is seriously impacted. 

should i do this before or after attempting a fix?  I feel like i might damage it more if i do it now.  I tried it with only a little pressure and it didnt seem to bend at all.  

 

I think the videos linked looked like a little overboard for something that might not end up working.  Ill probably use jb weld or epoxy.  Ive heard people get better results with epoxy.  Im about to make a home depot run, so if anyone else has any input on this let me know!



#8 TeamHonda401

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Posted 10 October 2013 - 04:52 PM

Make sure you clamp the blade before you put epoxy on the damage. Epoxy expands when it hardens, which causes the blade to expand as well if it isn't secured, which could cause more damage to the blade. A couple well placed c-clamps will prevent any expansion of the blade when the epoxy hardens.

#9 Vet88

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Posted 10 October 2013 - 05:02 PM

I have tried the epoxy / glue approach and found a lot depends on what the interior of the blade is made of. If it is a foam core, the glue you put in the crack has nothing to hold onto and will let go again after a short while. The only long term success I have seen is using carbon fibre cloth, much like the video link in the prior post. There are variations to this eg instead of a patch you would sand the blade around the cracked area and then wrap the blade with carbon fibre sheet, much like how they repair broken carbon fibre fishing rods. It's all a matter of time and hard work.



#10 fatwabbit

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Posted 10 October 2013 - 05:39 PM

A lot of it also depends on the setting of the epoxy. You need to ensure that pressure is applied via a clamp or similar to ensure that you get a decent bond between the surfaces. The 'problem' is that if your blade splits again, you cannot remove the layer of set epoxy, and if you try to repair it again you now have an additional layer between the two sides of the split.

 

I've has some success with the Widow.. blade split from middle of the blade all the way down to the toe. I tried epoxy and taped up the stick all the way and it worked for another 3-4 hockey sessions, of which I had already consigned the stick to eventually break and just ripped into slappers during warmups. Surprisingly the blade still held strong, and its now used for practice shots.

 

I'd say give it a shot with JB or epoxy (i believe they are the same). Stay with the traditional type of epoxy, not the one with metal particle fillers etc. You need it to create a strong bond, and not worry about the wearing down of the epoxy.


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#11 jimmy

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Posted 10 October 2013 - 09:03 PM

Twp part epoxy really does nothing, it has no strength and will just chip/break away.  You really have to mix carbon fiber with it.


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#12 Ruhnie

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Posted 11 October 2013 - 03:56 PM

Unfortunately the widows have notoriously shitty blades. Luckily mine did this within my warranty window and they replaced it with a DT1. Are you still under warranty by chance?



#13 icewalker_bg

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Posted 11 October 2013 - 06:40 PM

Unfortunately for warrior, not only the widows have this issue with blades, diablos, dolomites have it too from personal experience. I was a good decision not to use warrior sticks after half a dozen of sticks with the exact same issue as OP after 2-3 games.

#14 bunnyman666

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Posted 11 October 2013 - 07:10 PM

Twp part epoxy really does nothing, it has no strength and will just chip/break away.  You really have to mix carbon fiber with it.


Dirty little secret- powdered graphite (as in what you lube a lock with) will work fine. 3:1 ratio epoxy to powder graphite. I used to work with composites a LOT.

#15 Vet88

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Posted 11 October 2013 - 08:11 PM

I can't see how this would help? You need the lattice of the carbon fibre to give strength to the epoxy. 



#16 Chadd

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Posted 11 October 2013 - 10:10 PM

Unfortunately the widows have notoriously shitty blades.

I have one shaft break after a year and another lose a chunk of the blade after 18 months or so. 


"Two percent of the people think; three percent of the people think they think; and ninety-five percent of the people would rather die than think."
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#17 bunnyman666

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Posted 15 October 2013 - 08:43 AM

I can't see how this would help? You need the lattice of the carbon fibre to give strength to the epoxy.


Graphite would bind with the fibres. Graphite and carbon fibre are relatives, even powdered graphite. Call this a crude version of nano carbon. Sure, a layer or two of bi-directional fabric would be even better, but I have used a LOT of this for small cracks. If you don't compact the two parts of the crack, the epoxy will do nothing, carbon, graphite powder or nothing mixed in. I learnt that trick from an engineer at Zipp Speed Weaponry, a company who produces high performance carbon fibre bicycle wheels.

Hand-laid carbon fibre gets 50/50 fibre to resin at best. Most high-po carbon is 60/40 or even 70/30 until you get into the crazy F1 stuff. I've never looked at a broken composite twig, but I think i will have a few more opportunities in the near future.

#18 romdj

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Posted 15 October 2013 - 10:21 AM

Graphite would bind with the fibres. Graphite and carbon fibre are relatives, even powdered graphite. Call this a crude version of nano carbon. Sure, a layer or two of bi-directional fabric would be even better, but I have used a LOT of this for small cracks. If you don't compact the two parts of the crack, the epoxy will do nothing, carbon, graphite powder or nothing mixed in. I learnt that trick from an engineer at Zipp Speed Weaponry, a company who produces high performance carbon fibre bicycle wheels.

Hand-laid carbon fibre gets 50/50 fibre to resin at best. Most high-po carbon is 60/40 or even 70/30 until you get into the crazy F1 stuff. I've never looked at a broken composite twig, but I think i will have a few more opportunities in the near future.

amazing tip!



#19 Vet88

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Posted 16 October 2013 - 06:02 AM

Graphite would bind with the fibres. Graphite and carbon fibre are relatives, even powdered graphite. Call this a crude version of nano carbon. Sure, a layer or two of bi-directional fabric would be even better, but I have used a LOT of this for small cracks. If you don't compact the two parts of the crack, the epoxy will do nothing, carbon, graphite powder or nothing mixed in. I learnt that trick from an engineer at Zipp Speed Weaponry, a company who produces high performance carbon fibre bicycle wheels.

Hand-laid carbon fibre gets 50/50 fibre to resin at best. Most high-po carbon is 60/40 or even 70/30 until you get into the crazy F1 stuff. I've never looked at a broken composite twig, but I think i will have a few more opportunities in the near future.

Ahh, light bulb moment, brilliant. What kind / brand of epoxy did you use?



#20 bunnyman666

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Posted 16 October 2013 - 06:14 AM

Ahh, light bulb moment, brilliant. What kind / brand of epoxy did you use?


Household epoxy. On a crack like that, it would be useless to mix up a big ol' batch of West Systems stuff. Smear your mixture into the crack with a popsicle stick, then wrap it tight with electrical tape. I make a special roll of tape with some perforations so that excess epoxy bleeds out, but you don't have to do that.

By all mean though- if JB Weld works well, use that. It is one of the finest household epoxies on the planet. I have used it to install/re-install metal parts on bike frames. You're just not re-connecting the fibres.

#21 jonesy9020

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Posted 20 June 2014 - 04:49 PM

Recently picked up a used CCM CL for a steal. It's got a small crack about 4 inches above the blade in the taper area. I flexed it in the store and heard a cracking noise but decided to pick it up anyway, figuring I'd just convert it to a 2 piece with a tapered blade when it inevitable snapped. The blade is still quite stiff, there's just this crack in the taper area. I've tried to reinforce it a bit by wrapping it tightly with tape, but I may try the epoxy graphite fix as well.

Any other advice for a crack in this area of a stick? Thanks in advance.

#22 bunnyman666

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Posted 20 June 2014 - 05:13 PM

It would be best if wrapped with cf tape, but that would screw with the kick properties. Try the epoxy/graphite powder trick and maybe increase the epoxy/graphite powder mix to 1:1. You would need a digital gram scale to do this. It's worth a shot if you got it cheap.

#23 Sprungdownunder

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Posted 20 June 2014 - 05:33 PM

I had a crack in my easton rs in the bladder on the blade , I could flex it a little & hear it cracking so looked up you tube & found that young guy repair his blade with two part epoxy & carbon fibre.So I decided to give it a go & got some two part epoxy & carbon fibre from a boat repair shop.
Yes it is a bit of work but the result is I have now had the stick for more then 6 months & there is no sign of it giving up.
Also on the toe of sticks were they cop a lot of damage I sand that area up & epoxy it & stick a little piece of carbon fibre there or in if there is a gap ,tape it & let it dry for 24
then re sand result is it can take further abuse & last longer.
This process does slightly change the weight of your stick.