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Blitz

Which Blade Curve For High Slap Shots & High Wrist Shots?

37 posts in this topic

I'm basically looking to get my slap shot up high easily but also want to be able to snipe it up high with a wrist shot. Looking for a one-piece composite if possible.

I know the Drury allows you to roof it from up close but I'm hearing bad things about the slap shot?

Probably looking at getting the Easton Stealth.

I'm a forward also looking for a round toe so I can do some curl and drags if need be. And I figured a heel or mid-heel curve might be easier for my to have a harder and higher slap shot.

Any recommendations? Thanks!

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The only thing I'm worried about with a Drury is the "Slight" Curve Depth. Shouldn't I be going for a more "Deep" Depth? Or does the depth not really matter for getting my shots up high?

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i use the Drury and all of the clones... i find my follow through has more impact on my shot height rather than the depth of the curve.

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More depth and an open face make it easier to roof it and lift the puck. Try a Sakic Stealth.

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I was thinking a heel curve or mid-heel curve would be better for my slap shots. Am I right?

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personal preference. my brother uses a Forsberg/Modano and his slapshot is ridiculous. try what feels best.

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I was thinking a heel curve or mid-heel curve would be better for my slap shots. Am I right?

Really, you are looking WAY too deep into curves. Having one curve and not having another doesn't limit the type of shots you can/can't take. Once you get used to a curve you have to rely on your skill. If you don't have the fundamentals, it wont really matter which curve you have.

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i find my follow through has more impact on my shot height rather than the depth of the curve.

Agree. I find it's about 80% technique and 20% your curve pattern.

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Lidstrom or drury i reckon are the only patterns fitting the bill, although if u dont want the square toe on the lidstrom then drury is the only option. I love both even though i find keeping slaps down a bit difficult they are a beast when you're in close and need to smash mommas cookie jar. wristers are like laser beams from any distance

drury sounds best for you, but like every1 has said its all about playing consistantly with one pattern till you get used to it then you can do whatever you want

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A proper wrist snap, and follow through, and a powerful core (legs and abdomen) combined with proper technique for all of your various shots will have a much greater effect on your shot than your curve will.

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Like a coach would tell us: "Get good." Learn how to shoot and let your technique get you to lift the puck where you want it. I used to think people being lazy and not searching for stuff here was just general laziness but I see it spreading into actual play.

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i find my follow through has more impact on my shot height rather than the depth of the curve.

Agree. I find it's about 80% technique and 20% your curve pattern.

Yep.

I use two curves: Lindros (big mid curve) and Forsberg (small mid-heel curve). I've spent all summer at a practice range shooting a couple hundred pucks a few times a week. I can pick corners and hit the crossbar with either pattern. I've been liking flatter curves lately as it's easier to keep them LOW.

For getting pucks up quick, just set a hockey bag full of equipment in front of the goal, stand a couple feet off to the side and work on flicking that puck into the opposite corner both forehand and backhand.

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A slight curve depth would probably be best if your objectives are just high and hard slapshots. It will give you a larger sweet spot on the blade. But, really I would recommend practicing your technique over using a different blade...like everyone else said. Beside that, the best shots really aren't the high shots...they're usually a very low percentage shot, with a very bad shooting angle.

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just so you can see sometime, lay down on the ice where the puck is with a goalie in net. you will see very that from where the puck is there is much more scoring area below the goalie's waist rather than up around the crossbar area. that doesnt mean that you never need to shoot there, but just some food for thought. that being said the lidstrom sounds like a great curve for what you describe, but practice is the most important thing, because no matter what curve you have you are still going to have to be able to hit every part of the net. knocking the water bottle off top shelf looks pretty cool, but the truth is its not where most goals are scored, and they all look the same on the scoresheet. practice practice practice.

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i'm using an Easton ST right now, with a Sakic curve, and it gives me a CANNON of a shot. it's sometimes a little tough to get a real good saucer pass off with it. The NBH equivalent to the Sakic would be the Naslund (P92), while the Warrior Draper would also be similar, if not identical.

I took a few shots with the NBH One90, and would seriously consider picking one up if i were in the market for another OPS.

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i find my follow through has more impact on my shot height rather than the depth of the curve.

Agree. I find it's about 80% technique and 20% your curve pattern.

I understand that. But I might as well get that 20% down now that I'm not trained and used to a specific type of curve.

It sounds like the Drury is what I'm looking for. Is the slight curve depth something I should worry about for getting my shot up high or no?

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I think either the Forsberg or Drury would be good for developing technique. Very little curve means you have to have better technique (weight transfer, flex, wrist roll, follow through) in order to put it where you want.

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i'm using an Easton ST right now, with a Sakic curve, and it gives me a CANNON of a shot. it's sometimes a little tough to get a real good saucer pass off with it. The NBH equivalent to the Sakic would be the Naslund (P92), while the Warrior Draper would also be similar, if not identical.

I took a few shots with the NBH One90, and would seriously consider picking one up if i were in the market for another OPS.

Draper has a different rocker than the Sakic, I think.

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Blitz, what curve are you using right now?

For me it's all about the lie of the stick. I can adapt to new curves alot easier if the lie is close or the same because I don't have to drastically alter my shooting mechanics.

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Blitz, what curve are you using right now?

I went to the store, had to buy a stick that day. Originally wanted a Gaborik but they didn't have that curve for the stick I wanted. Having done absolutely zero research about the curves before buying it, I decided to go with what "looked" fine. I choose the Iginla. I'm not very happy with it. I'll have an easier time keeping my shots down with a Drury than I will with getting my shots up with an Iginla.

Back when I played as a kid I didn't realize there were all these classifications for blades. When I rejoined hockey a month or so ago after years and years of hiatus, I was overwhelmed. Maybe I didn't pay attention as a kid what I was actually buying.

Thanks for your help, guys. Greatly appreciated. I think I'm going for the Drury.

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Spezza - very good curve for this, although it is the technique that is most important.

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