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mike_big_mac

The Perfect Curve

102 posts in this topic

I used the search and the closest topic I could find was a guy trying to decide which hand he was and what curve to start out with as a beginner. I had a conversation with a guy on my hockey team last night, who asked me an interesting question: "How Do You Pick Your Curve?" and it got me thinking, I'm not even sure. I have always used the same curve my entire life. It just "feels" right.

How do you choose a curve if you have just started playing hockey. I mean you can't try out a stick before you purchase it... so what should a newbie look for when buying a stick? What curve do you all use (heel, open, closed, deep, toe, etc.) and why did you choose it?

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Depends on your playing style, which will change the more you play and improve.

Buy a shaft and get cheap wood blades with different patterns. A lot of beginners end up overthinking which curve to use but the quickest and most straight forward way is through trial-and-error.

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When you're just starting out, finding the most neutral curve is best, IMO. This would be the Zetterberg/PM09/Savard/P34's of the world. The perfect curve is all personal preference once you get into it. For me, it's the pro version of the retail PM9: Modano's pro curve. I can do anything and everything with the puck with that curve that I want, more often than any other curve I've used. But that is just me, and I'm sure every following poster will have their perfect curve that works for them.

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I would say start off with the PM9, etc... style curves as they will be the easiest to stick handle with for a new person. Then the person may think "I wish I had more curve in the blade and it was more open to help my shots get up quicker" and they can go from there. That's how it happened for me at least. Everyone is different though and it's all personal preference.

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I started with a Thornton Curve from CCM thinking that banana was the best thing ever, then I got a lecavalier at one point, liked it, moved to drury, and kept putting stuff over the net, so I finally settled on a Zetterberg/Forsberg/Cammaleri. Saying starting neutral is better may not be true. it's harder to cradle and shoot the puck with a neutral blade, that's why I liked the Thornton. I could pull back and shoot no problem. Once my shooting mechanic improved I was able to move to more and more neutral curves because I got the motions down. I love a long neutral blade because I can do a lot more with it. Oh and I primarily only use wood blades at this point. price/feel you can't beat it in my opinion

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For me, I bought a RBK composite when I first started that had the Datsyuk curve. I basically learned how to play the game with that stick, so my game adjusted to the curve. Now, I have improved by leaps and bounds since then, but I still feel most comfortable with that curve.

The shaft/blade combo is the best way to go about figuring out what curve is best for a player, minimal investment combined with ability to change blades as often as you want.

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Upon starting playing a long time ago, I used a pretty standard mid curve. Like anyone else, I saw that some bigger curves could aid with shot velocity a little bit, so I then switched to the Easton Yzerman banana hook. That didn't last long before I switched to the old Easton Sakic (even straighter than the Zetterberg/PM9) and eventually to the Zetterberg/PM9. Yeah, it's probably one of the more straight retail curves you can pick, but it works so wonderfully for nearly everything.

Allows great stickhandling because of its mild nature, wide sweet spot for shots (can shoot from the heel, mid, or toe section of the blade), and makes backhand work very simple. Most people should probably start out with something very similar to this curve and after they get a good deal of experience and learn their preferences, adjust from there. I just never switched away from it. :biggrin: Last week while sitting on the bench, I scanned around and saw that just over 1/3rd of the guys on my team use the Zetterberg/PM9. Just so versatile and honestly most of the more skilled players I've ever played against have used it.

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I started out with a straight stick, and went to curves when I could no longer find a straight stick. Since then, I've stuck with the mildest curves I could find. Seems to me, as others have said, that it's easier for stickhandling and backhands, and I can lift as high as I need to, so I don't feel any need to change.

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All depends on what you like more. Don't settle on the first curve you use, it may take 2 or 3 maybe even more before you find what you like. You may find that after 4 sticks the first was your favorite, happens to us all.

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Agree with those who say it is through trial-and-error, but you'll have some innate feeling on what you want just by picking a particular curve in the store. You'll naturally be drawn to some curves over others. Start with those and go from there....

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started with a sakic and love bauers p92 curve. Can get off good backhands, excellent accuracy too with these curves. great for toe drags and dekeing and stick handling. All around the perfect curve for me.

Edited by farhanshak

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When you're just starting out, finding the most neutral curve is best, IMO. This would be the Zetterberg/PM09/Savard/P34's of the world. The perfect curve is all personal preference once you get into it. For me, it's the pro version of the retail PM9: Modano's pro curve. I can do anything and everything with the puck with that curve that I want, more often than any other curve I've used. But that is just me, and I'm sure every following poster will have their perfect curve that works for them.

what is the pro version of the retail PM9?

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may sound weird, but for me, if i think it is esthetically pleasing, i know it will work..I visualize shooting with it, and if it works, I will give it a shot.. of course there is always an adjustment period, especially if you you are coming off a diff curve, but for me, for the most part, I go with mid- toe curves so it doesn't take much adjustment. I don't like heels as I mostly take wristers and almost never take snap shots.

If you have never played and are choosing a curve for the first time, you will either not know any better and adapt to whatever curve you end up getting, or should just choose a curve with a light mid curve that is versatile for all kinds of shots.

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I'm the same as bar down. Right now I use a drury, modono, and a gionta. It takes maybe 5 or 6 shots to adjust then after that its no problem.

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Like others have mentioned in this thread, I too started with a Coffey (deep mid). I never, ever, got the feel for Forsberg/PM9-ish patterns, nor do I necessarily agree that it's a rule all beginners should start with that curve. IMO, I think that's bad advice, actually.

No matter how often I experiment, (and I've been using a Kremlin almost exclusively) I always have a Lids/Jovo/P02 on hand. It's my absolute favorite curve for just about everything.

Edited by halfmoonyote

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Big curves make it much easier to lift the puck and from what I've seen, players that start with big curves have a lot of problems switching to something with a smaller curve. Can you do it, sure. Most guys just get frustrated and go back to bigger, or more lofted, curves. I'm a fan of new players starting out with moderate curves, with more attention being paid to finding the right lie.

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I agree with Chadd, and that's what I was trying to say in my above post. I always hate recommending curves to new guys because I really believe there is no 'rule' for a beginner curve. I also couldn't agree more with Chadd that I'm more inclined to help steer guys to an appropriate lie and flex.

Edited by halfmoonyote

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I started with the Lidstrom curve but found the deepness of the curve made touch passing and deflections difficult. I switched to a Drury curve and I found the better elements of my game got better. I think I'll be moving on to a variant of the Sherwood Ryan pattern with more of a heel curve rather than a mid-heel curve. I love the size of the sweet spot.

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Big curves make it much easier to lift the puck and from what I've seen, players that start with big curves have a lot of problems switching to something with a smaller curve. Can you do it, sure. Most guys just get frustrated and go back to bigger, or more lofted, curves. I'm a fan of new players starting out with moderate curves, with more attention being paid to finding the right lie.

As I like to say, loft = lack of ----ing talent (I actually stole it from a guy I play with). Guys absolutely should begin with moderate, neutral face curves and learn to shoot and pass. Then they can start experimenting once they know what they're doing and know how to control their shots.

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what is the pro version of the retail PM9?

Was in my original post you quoted. If you hit up patterndb.org you can find the curve.

When you're just starting out, finding the most neutral curve is best, IMO. This would be the Zetterberg/PM09/Savard/P34's of the world. The perfect curve is all personal preference once you get into it. For me, it's the pro version of the retail PM9: Modano's pro curve. I can do anything and everything with the puck with that curve that I want, more often than any other curve I've used. But that is just me, and I'm sure every following poster will have their perfect curve that works for them.

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I started off with a P88 curve, it worked really well for my stick handling. Then i wanted to be able to get the puck up quicker so i switched to a P106, huge sweet spot. i then switched to a P14/P92 they have worked really well for my game. Ive gravitated more to the "shooter" patterns, which is what my game mainly consists of just shooting snappers/slap shots. but i love the feel when i stick handle in a P14. Just try as many as you can until you find one that fits your game as said before. but dont be surprised if you end up switching every so often to something new, your game will always change in some form.

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For me, I started with a Sakic/Hall curve,, worked on getting everything right then experimented with other curves. Now, I'm using a Gionta and a Kremlin because i've figured out backhands on it. Give me time, and I can play with any curve.

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I started off with a Roenick curve on my Easton Pro Axis Aluminum stick. Then went to Thornton (CCM), Amonte/Bergeron/p30, and Yzerman patterns. Those two have to be my favorite patterns. If I use anything that's a straighter curve, he puck tends to fly right due to the lower flex I use.

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