Jump to content
Slate Blackcurrant Watermelon Strawberry Orange Banana Apple Emerald Chocolate Marble
Slate Blackcurrant Watermelon Strawberry Orange Banana Apple Emerald Chocolate Marble

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'Custom'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Front Office
  • Locker Room
    • Ice Hockey Equipment
    • Roller Hockey Equipment
    • Equipment Reviews
    • The Prosharp Project
  • Equipment Reviews
  • Goalie Corner
    • Goal Equipment
    • Goalie Product Catalogues
    • Goal Equipment Reviews
    • Fundamentals and Techniques
    • Goalie Video Coaching
    • General Goalie Discussion
  • Post-Game Hangout
    • General Hockey Discussions
    • NHL Discussions
    • Miscellaneous Discussions
    • Coaches' Room
    • How do I...?
  • MSH Gear Exchange
    • Paid Subscriptions To Gear Exchange
    • Sell

Categories

  • 2018 Product Catalogues
  • 2017 Product Catalogues
  • 2016 Product Catalogues
  • 2015 Product Catalogues
  • 2014 Product Catalogues
  • 2013 Product Catalogues
  • 2012 Product Catalogues
  • 2011 Product Catalogues
  • 2009 Product Catalogues
    • MSH 5th Anniversary Logo
  • 2008 Product Catalogues
  • 2007 Product Catalogues
  • 2006 Product Catalogues
  • 2005 Product Catalogues
  • Miscellaneous

Product Groups

  • MSH Pro Shop
    • The Prosharp Project
  • MSH Store
  • Subscription to Gear Exchange
  • MSH Winterfest Registration
  • MSH SummerJam Registration
  • Ads
  • MSH Winterfest Shop

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


AIM


MSN


Website URL


Twitter


ICQ


Instagram


Yahoo


Jabber


XBL


PSN


Skype


Location


Interests


Spambot control


Skates


Stick


Gloves


Helmet


Pants


Shoulder Pads


Elbow Pads


Shin Pads


Hockey Bag


Trophies

Found 17 results

  1. How / where can I get a pair of bauer vapor xxxx in 6 3/4? The custom size is the only thing I'm really interested in; no other changes.
  2. Hey everyone, While I'm sure everyone has seen or used the new Warrior Stick Customizer, there is a problem. The Junior has only three curves to choose from, the W03, W28, and W88. I would love to see more diverse curve selection, because not everyone can flex an Intermediate or Senior, or doesn't like the W03. Why aren't there any more Junior curves, and could Warrior add them?
  3. I don't want whine.... but I kinda of expect white glove service when I spend $1300 on a pair of skates. The fact that Pure Hockey and True Hockey have both been terrible in regards to customer service doesn't reinforce my feelings that I made a good investment in buying skates from them. Background: There are no True Hockey "fit" shops in Washington State currently. I was traveling to NorCal for work so I went to Pure Hockey and had them perform the scans, take pictures and place the order. The order was for a pair of True skates with added shot blockers, extra tongue with metatarsal protection, Step/VH holder, and two pairs of Step Steel. Pure Hockey said the skates would be shipped to my home in Seattle, WA since I don't live local to their store. Issues/Problems: The first scan done at Pure Hockey was not acceptable and needed to be done a second time. However, I had to contact Pure Hockey to check if the first scan was sufficient. It was then that they said True Hockey asked for a new scan. Since I was only in town for 48 hours it's likely they would not have told me they needed a new scan until after I left the state. Good thing I followed up. After the order was placed Pure Hockey went radio silent on me. No email. No calls. Nothing. I had to personally contact True Hockey to make sure they got the scans and verify the order details. True verified everything and said the skates were going into production to be built. Following up with True Hockey on the status I was told that the skates were done and shipped two days prior! Wait!? What!? How come True Hockey or Pure Hockey didn't tell me? If you are selling a premium product it would be good to have an email that says "Your skates are on their way! Welcome to the true Hockey family." Something. Anything... just send me some communication so I know you didn't take my money and fall off the face of the earth. At least make me feel like I mean something until after I get the product. Then you can throw me away. Perhaps True Hockey can learn from Apple on how to accomplish making consumers feel like we mean something. I have gone to shady used car dealerships who paid more attention to me to "get the deal closed." True Hockey would not give me the shipping information and told me to speak with Pure Hockey. Pure Hockey referred me back to True Hockey. I was passed back and forth before they finally told me "I do apologize for the miscommunication and misunderstanding regarding the tracking of your order. We could not provide you with the tracking number as there is more than one single order being delivered to the store with the associated tracking number." Ok, wait... What? Who gives a shit if there are 1000 pairs being shipped in the same order. I want to know when my skates were shipped, the location they were shipped to and an estimated date of arrival. Excuse me for giving a shit about $1300 of hockey gear! Pure Hockey said the skates would be shipped directly to my home in Seattle, WA since I don't live near the Pure Hockey store in San Jose, CA. True Hockey said they will only ship to the retailer and would never ship to the customer and had no idea why I was told otherwise. So, why the heck was I told something totally different? There should be consistency. I was not the first order they had ever placed. When was someone going to tell me that my skates were going to NorCal and not Seattle? When they arrived in NorCal? WTF!? This goes back to my original problem. Communication. Communication. Communication. Communication. Communication. Communication. Communication. Communication. Communication. Communication. Communication. Communication........ Summary: Not hearing from Pure Hockey or True Hockey unless I reached out is a problem. If you want to sell a premium product you need to provide premium customer service. Again, I relate this to Apple. When you buy an Apple product you are paying for fit, finish but most importantly customer service. If the device malfunctions, you can rest assured someone will help you. This is why people are willing to pay the "Apple tax" for their products.
  4. I ordered a pair of custom CCM Jetspeed FT1's. The scanned my foot 3 times and it gave them 3 different skate sizes. I was told before making the purchase that the depth of the skate would be modified to accommodate my higher instep. The skate came in the exact same way as it would stock except for my name stitched into the fabric on the tongue. The hockey shop told me they have many ways to adjust for a proper fitment. I have been there every week for almost 2 months for an adjustment since I can't wear the skate for longer than 10 minutes without limping and rippihttps://i.imgur.com/9GhISTt.pngng the skates off asap. They now have no other adjustment option for the fitment of my skate that I paid almost $1300 for. Does anyone have any idea how to relive the tension off of my instep so I can use these skates? My foot is literally popping out of the boot. lol Here's a pic. Hopefully, someone has an idea that they haven't tried.
  5. iammerson

    Custom pant shells

    Hey guys team is looking to make custom hockey pant shells. Anyone have any good recommendations?
  6. Hi All, Longtime lurker, first time poster...;) This is a fantastic forum and resource for all things hockey equipment related so I thought what better place to ask my question! I'm looking to get my name embroidered onto my Bauer Nexus gloves on the cuff or the side (whatever)...anyone have any recommendations in the Greater Toronto Area (or anywhere else)? Please let me know and thanks in advance!
  7. LowStoneWall32

    Mask Painting Safety Q's

    What's the big deal? I've heard it over and over; "Don't paint your mask, it'll make it unsafe." "The paint could degrade the mask". Etc. But how bad is it really? I'm using the NME3 playing varsity roller hockey. I won't be sanding it. And I'm pretty sure painting my death cage isn't going to make it any less safe to use. The spray paint I got is the 2 in 1, kind that has color and primer. Plus my mask is already white. On the can it says good for wood, plastic, metal. Okay now that safety question is outta the way, onto the technique. I hear you're supposed to sand the mask first so the paint will grip, but I plan on being able to repaint the mask. Should I not sand it? I plan on it going like this: 1- prep mask by taking off cage, scrubbing any fingerprint grease off , covering all the foam with tape, take off backplate because I'm not painting that part. 2- spray paint first coat without sanding. 3-let it dry 4-add more coats if needed 5- tape off simple design 6- another coat 7- final with clear gloss finish 8-dry & done Does that process sound right? Then if I get put on another team I'll sand it. So basically my mask will only be good for 2 paint jobs. I think.
  8. JDhouston

    Custom skates in Texas

    Can't find skates that fit my big feet so it looks like I'm going to take the plunge and go custom. Living in Houston TX I don't think I can get anyone for a proper fit. Might have to drive to Dallas? Any recommendations on where to go. I've been reading and reading on how important it is to have a knowledgeable fitter. Thanks!
  9. Dear community, I find myself in a position to require advice from you. I'm a Swiss amateur hockey referee, averaging 2-3 games a week, a bit over 20 years old, about 6 feet tall and weigh 83 kg (should be about 180-190 pounds). I happen to own an MX3 (9D) I totally adore for the feel while skating. But in the last year my foot (the right one especially) grew significantly wider and the skate, already at the beginning a little bit too tightly fitting, can't be baked into shape. In addition, the center of pressure in the skate is well off the blade axis. So I sought after replacement and slipped into an 1X and was delighted to take it out for a weekend with two games. It was a try out model, half a size too small (8.5D) and unbaked and left quite some pain as it was too narrow and I also cut into my legs outside, where the MX3 has the luxurious comfort edge. According to the guys at my LHS this is well known for the 1X. At this time I really consider having a pair of 1X skated tailored to my needs and feet, thus featuring the tendon guard, comfort edge and tongue of the MX3, for I hate those fluffy tongues and adore the springboard effect of the stiff insert. I'll also want to have the lacing of the 1X and awesome balance of the 1X / speedplate combo and if possible a softer version of the CURV. This is where your opinion is required. Do you think there are other possibilities? Could maybe Graf or VHF handle it? Might it be worth waiting for the 1S? Or does something else come up someone's mind? With the kindest of regards Bulawa Edit: The part of my foot that really widened is the forefoot, so I have quite a V shaped foot. Another thing I'd really like to have are the 280mm Edge holder I have on both my NXG and MX3, as I have a decent set of steels by now.
  10. INTRODUCTION Two of the prominent features of hockey gloves are the palm and the gussets. (Custom cuffs would probably be next!) When I set out to order my custom Easton Pro+ gloves, I tried to research as many options as I could to pick out my specs. The information and videos about palms and gussets are scattered and sparse, so this is my attempt to bring together the information into one place. Obviously, each material will vary from user to user, so take the information as you will. I'm open to suggestions to improve this post. Special thanks to Pat Rivest for letting me visit his shop and pick his brain. OVERVIEW Hockey palms can be either genuine leather or synthetic leather. They will vary in thickness and durability. The synthetic leather options will be generally more durable than genuine leather. Their grip will depend on whether there is an addition adhesive or pattern added to the material. Genuine leather palms used in hockey gloves mostly come from goatskin. Common natural leather options are Digital, mustang, and kangaroo. Those names are given by the manufacturer, Pittards; it does not necessarily relate to their source animal. They tend to be labelled as “performance” materials as they are not intended to be durable palms. Another drawback is that they may have irregularities from being a natural hide. These palms are not usually found on stock retail gloves because of their lower durability. Rather, they’re found on gloves for players who request it, whether it’s a pro or a regular customer. Synthetic leathers are man-made. Common synthetic leather options are nash and micronash. In general, they are microfibers made to look like genuine leather but with improved durability and stain resistance. Based on their features, synthetic leathers are found not only on most (if not all) retail stock gloves, but usually on pro gloves, too. Hockey companies are always looking for the optimal synthetic palm material that is thin, durable, and soft, so more options are available on the market now than in previous years. Replacement palms are available for genuine leathers and synthetic leathers. Companies will offer replacement palms pre-made (such as the ones found in the catalogue from Nash Sports) or will create them from the source material (such as repalming services offered at Custom Pro Repair). GENUINE LEATHERS Digital: Comes in grey.Goatskin supplied by Pittards. (Synthetic non-Pittards “Digital” is not true Digital.)Considered a “performance” leather.Medium thickness between kangaroo/yellow mustang and pearl mustang.Properly known as Digital textured leather and was first used in collaboration with Franklin as a “grip-enhanced leather for baseball batting gloves”.May also been known as “Carbon Fibre Digital”.Can be used as a base palm, and often used as an overlay for grip.Has a pattern stamped onto the material to provide grip. (Looks similar to Suregrip, except Suregrip is a synthetic leather. Digital from Pittards will stay grippy over the course of its lifetime but nash-based synthetic variants will get slick over time.)A common option for custom gloves at the pro and consumer level for its grip and feel.Digital Tacky: Comes in a dark grey.It is Digital (as above), but it is treated with an adhesive/glue to make it more sticky.Generally used as an overlay only for added grip. Digital Tacky (top), Digital (bottom). Warrior Franchise, Digital palm, micronash gussets. Warrior Franchise, Digital palm, Digital Tacky overlay. Mustang: Comes in pearl and yellow.Suede goatskin supplied by Pittards.Considered a “performance” leather.Pearl mustang is the thickest of all the “performance” genuine leathers and has the least grip.Yellow mustang is thinner and has more grip than pearl mustang.Yellow mustang is comparable to kangaroo, but with slightly less grip.Was a popular option mostly for custom Warrior gloves. Yellow mustang (top), pearl mustang (bottom). Warrior Franchise, yellow mustang palm. Warrior Franchise, pearl mustang palm. Kangaroo: Comes in one color, yellow.Goatskin supplied by Pittards.Considered a “performance” leather.Apparently, it was given the name “kangaroo” because of its color! (It’s not made from kangaroo hide.)Supple and grippy material.Similar thickness (thinness?) to yellow mustang.Kangaroo and yellow mustang have a relatively lower durability compared to the rest of the genuine leathers.Was an option mostly for custom Warrior gloves. Kangaroo. Warrior Franchise, kangaroo palm. Horsehide and cowhide: These palms are (presumably) made from their respective source animals.They’re usually very thick and most often used by players who prefer an old-school style of glove.Horsehide is reportedly not as durable as goatskin.Not a common option.SYNTHETIC LEATHERS Nash: Comes in ivory, light grey, dark grey, and black. (No difference between the colors except the look.)Technically described as a “polyester micro fiber, non-woven, synthetic suede”.Synthetic suedes can be made by a variety of companies with a variety of thicknesses, so quality can vary depending on the supplier.(Nash is the biggest point of confusion for me. I believe that “nash” is a generic term for synthetic suede made in a certain fashion. There isn’t a synthetic suede company called “Nash”. There must be a few dominant suppliers, including Clarino by Kuraray and Ennis, that supply the majority of the “nash” product. Whoever is the main supplier might be the nash that is the commonly-used palm that we know.)Thick and durable palm material, usually 1.0 mm.Can be used as a base palm for a durable palm and/or as an overlay for additional durability.Pro players may prefer to use this palm because it’s common and they are used to it.Compared to Clarino, nash will last longer but will become more brittle and hard when dried.Because nash is made with a water-based adhesive, sweat will eventually soak into the palm and break down the bonds, which leads to pilling and splitting.The nash material has no relation to Nash Sports, who supplies hockey products and accessories such as replacement palms.Suregrip (Nash Grip): Comes in grey.Described as an “embossed artificial suede”.It is grey nash (as above), but with a pattern stamped onto the material (“embossed”) to provide a grippy texture.Looks similar to Digital, except Digital is a genuine leather. (Hence, this could be called "synthetic digital".)It is a thick and durable palm that is 1.0 mm thick. Suregrip/Nash Grip (top), grey nash (middle), ivory nash (bottom). Easton Pro, grey nash palm and gussets. Easton Synergy 800, ivory nash palm and gussets. CCM U+ CL, Suregrip palm. Clarino: Comes in ivory, light grey, dark grey, and black. (No difference between the colors except the look.)Clarino is a broad term that describes a variety of synthetic leathers produced by Kuraray.A non-woven bundle of intertwined microfibers that is buffed, napped, and dyed to become a soft and supple suede-like product that resembles genuine leather. (Check out the manufacturing process!)(There is likely a specific subtype of synthetic suede within the Clarino company that is used in hockey. It might simply be known as “Clarino nash”.)It is similar to nash but has a different construction that makes it more soft when dried but less durable.Clarino nash is used by Bauer in the 2015 Nexus 800 for a soft feel. (Though, interestingly, non-Clarino nash is used in the Nexus 1000…)Clarino nash is used by CCM in the 2015 Ultra Tacks for a pro feel.Clarino is used by Warrior in the 2015 AX1 and QR1 for a pro feel and durability. MIA MB22, Clarino palm. Micronash: Comes in (light) grey, dark grey, and beige. (There is no difference between the colors except the look.)Synthetic microfiber.Thin and durable palm material with consistent reports of having good feel.Exclusive material to Warrior gloves, and sometimes underrated. Warrior Franchise, Micronash palm and gussets. AX Suede: Polyester suede, which allows for a variety of colors.AX Suede Quattro+ is exclusive to Bauer and is a “triple-fiber blend palm” in the MX3 and APX2 used for soft feel, abrasion resistance, and moisture management.AX Suede is used by Easton in the 2015 Synergy HSX as a two-piece palm for a tactile feel and abrasion resistance. (0.75 mm thickness)AX Suede is used by CCM in the 2015 4R Pro for durability, soft feel, and grip.MSH3: Polyester microsuede that is (likely) from China.MSH3 is a thin and durable material, per Eagle.MSH3 in an evolution of MSH2, which was popular when first launched and had a strong run of popularity.Exclusive material to Eagle gloves, though reportedly can be repalmed on other gloves. Eagle Aero Pro, MSH3 palm. (Pic courtesy of The Hockey Shop.) TPS HGT, MSH3 palm. Eagle X70, MSH2 palm. VX Suede: Synthetic suede leather with a soft feel, per Eagle.VX Suede is used by Eagle in the 2015 Sentry II for feel and durability.Tactik Microsuede: Microsuede palm used by Easton in the 2015 Stealth CX for soft feel and abrasion resistance.0.8 mm thickness.DURABILITY From the most durable to the least durable, based on discussion with Pat Rivest: nash (most durable)Micronashpearl mustangkangaroo/yellow mustang/Digital (least durable)Compare with the list generated by JunkyardAthletic. THICKNESS From the thickest to the thinnest, based on discussion with Pat Rivest: nash (thickest)pearl mustangDigitalkangaroo/yellow mustang/Micronash (thinnest)Compare with the list generated by Eagle Hockey circa 2008. OVERLAYAn overlay is an additional layer of material that goes overtop the base palm, typically over the middle portion of the palm but can also be found on other parts of the palm. One reason for an overlay is added durability. The overlay can be the same material as the palm to double the thickness of the palm. Another configuration is to have a thin palm but a thick overlay for a mixture of feel and durability. Some players might order without an overlay, therefore creating a single-layer palm, for increased feel. Bauer NXG, single layer (Clarino?) nash palm. Another reason for an overlay is added grip. The middle of the palm is where the stick rests in the hands, so that’s where the grip is added to the palm. In this case, materials that are used are often Suregrip, Digital, or Digital tacky. Bauer APX Pro, nash palm, Suregrip overlay. If you’re a pro player with very specific requests, you can have a special overlay pattern like Marian Gaborik! Gaborik glove overlay on palm and fingertips. GUSSETS The gussets are the materials between the fingers that connect the palm to the foam body of the glove. The gusset is usually the same material as the palm. For example, nash palms will have nash gussets, and Micronash palms will have Micronash gussets. Bauer 4-Roll Pro, (Clarino?) nash palm and gussets. In the case that a less durable material is used (e.g. Digital), the gussets will often be a more durable material, such as nash. Easton HSX, Digital palm, nash gussets. A popular custom choice is sponge mesh. Colors include white, black, and grey. It is lightweight and breathable. It’s found on pro gloves. Easton Pro, nash palms, white sponge mesh gussets. Another option is poly knit, which is a stretch material. Colors include white and black. It’s lightweight and breathable. It’s found on pro gloves. Bauer X60, nash palm, unknown overlay, black stretch gussets. Warrior Covert, Digital palm, kangaroo overlay, white stretch gussets. REPALMING SERVICES You may be keen to repalm your glove using a YouTube video, but I’d suggest going with experts who have the equipment and experience to do the job nicely. Mark “Peaches” Brennan of Peaches Pro Repair is a nice person with a good reputation who has done consistent good work for ModSquadHockey users, such as Harv and halfmoonyote. He’s a former NHL equipment manager and president of the Society of Pro Hockey Equipment Managers. His shop located in Portland, Oregon. Ralph Beavis of Nash Sports is a good guy who is also well regarded for his knowledge and experience in the industry. Peaches sends clients in Canada to him. His shop is in Lakefield, Ontario. Pat Rivest of Custom Pro Repair is a former employee at Warrior Hockey employee who teamed up with his colleague Ken to run their own glove repair and modification operation. He does a lot of good work and accommodates special requests, like the super-modified gloves from ibeck. His shop is in Lasalle, Quebec.
  11. Lemieux

    Easton Pro+ Custom Gloves (2015)

    BACKGROUND Four-roll gloves are classic - both in terms of ft and look - and I always thought that the coolest model was by Easton. I’ll have to admit - I wanted to look like an NHLer (that’s why forums like this exist, isn’t it?!), and it seemed like everyone wore these gloves. (Kudos to Easton’s pro and marketing departments for making that impression!) In particular, Easton has had good representation on my home team, the Edmonton Oilers, particularly during the 2006 Stanley Cup run: Hemsky, Horcoff, Stoll, Torres, Staios. (And some of them rocked white fingers on their gloves, too!) Look at all the Easton gloves! Shawn Horcoff, who was a beast in 2005-2006, scored a triple-OT winner in his sweet Easton gloves. I’ve been dreaming up custom Easton gloves as far back as 2011 when Pro Stock Hockey Gear announced a program called “The Works”. Unfortunately, that option closed before I was in a position to place an order (Easton closed their Canadian factory), so I thought that my dream glove would never materialize. (The PSHG would taunt me for my missed opportunity with photo galleries for the Works, the Synergy 800, and the EQ50.) One of the many mock-ups I made on PSHG’s customizers. But news of custom Easton gloves renewed my interest, so when I was in British Columbia this year, I had to stop at The Hockey Shop in Surrey. Once I slipped my hand into the new 2015 Pro+ glove, I was hooked. And after chatting with the internet-famous Jesse and talking gear with him, my mind was made up. This is the glove that set me on my path towards this custom order. SPECS Model: Pro+ Fit: Narrow Size: 14” -1/2" cuff Foam: EVA dual density PE insert: 1.5 mm Thumb: flex Palm: Pittard digital 0.85 mm Overlay: Pittard digital 0.85 mm Gusset: Poly knit black (stretch) Palm fit: standard Finger length: standard Gusset height: -1/4" Cuff length: -1/2" Embroidery: CHRISLE9 Pinky side: LET’S DO THIS! Easton Pro+ glove, front and side. Easton Pro+ glove, back. FIT My first impression was very positive when I slipped on the narrow version of the Pro+ gloves. It was my preferred fit: narrow without being tight. For years, Easton’s finger length would be too short or too long for me, but this version of the glove had finger lengths that fit me perfectly. Nice! Easton Pro+ glove, 14”, narrow fit. I am very fortunate that I was able to try the glove in person and make personalized tweaks. The Hockey Shop had the four variations of the Pro+ glove: standard, narrow, wide, and short. Pro+ glove in wide (orange), short (baby blue), standard (gray), narrow (gold). The order form illustrated the fit options: Cuff length, finger length, palm fit, gusset height. I opted to decrease the gusset height by 1/4". That eliminates excess material. This feature is on another pro glove that I own, and I knew that I liked the more responsive feel in my fingers. Seems to be a popular option nowadays, especially for those who are repalming their gloves. Finger gussets, -1/4" height. Short cuffs look cool. Easy as that! Options were to go +1/2" or -1/2". I’m not concerned about slashes to my wrist, so no need to be like Zach Parise. Cuff, -1/4". Palm fit could go +1/4" or -1/4". Finger length could go +1/4" or -1/4". I went standard for both of these options. Again, it was nice to try on the glove in person and decide whether or not I wanted to change these options. PROTECTION Since I don’t play in a competitive league, I did not maximize the protection options. Standard features were good enough for me. Easton describes the “EVA dual density” option as “lightweight + comfortable”. The other main option was “EPP”: “lightweight + protective”. These two options are chosen pretty equally, so it came down to personal preference. The PE insert comes as 1.5 mm (standard), which works out to be ~60 g, or 2.0 mm, which is 80 g. It’s possible to order without the PE inserts, too. The hockey glove thumb is designed around an important feature: preventing hyperextension (i.e. pulling it back too far). That’s why gloves usually brag about their “lock thumb”. Flexing the thumb, on the other hand, is a specific feature that requires extra parts for flexing and preventing hyperextension. I’m not sure that I involve my thumb as much as I think I do, but I like the idea of flexing the thumb when I want to, so that’s why I chose that option. Flex thumb, unflexed. Flex thumb, flexed. WEIGHT A single glove weighed 380 g (or 13.4 oz) on the scale I used. There’s a good heft to them. For the sake of comparison, Total Hockey’s website lists the weights for other comparable four-roll 14” gloves: the Bauer Nexus 1000 is 326 g (11.5 oz) and the Warrior Dynasty AX1 is 300 g (10.6 oz). DURABILITY The glove shell is made with “ProLite Tex”, which Easton describes as a “lightweight and durable knit fabric shell”. (There was not an option for a synthetic leather, which would have been nice for the white sections.) It holds up well enough, presumably, as these gloves are the same ones as pro orders. The palms are Pittard digital palms. It’s a popular pro option because it’s thin and grippy. It’s marketed as a performance product, so users need to be aware that it may wear out more quickly than other materials. For the overlay, which goes across the palmar creases of the palm, I chose to go with the digital material. Digital palm with digital overlay. For all of the talk about feel, this palm feels thicker than I expected! It’s listed as 0.85 mm on the form. Maybe I need to break in the palms a bit more to get a better assessment of it. Maybe I could’ve gone without the overlay. Other options from Easton included Ax Suede white (0.75 mm, found on their retail 2015 Synergy glove), Velukid brown (0.8 mm, a microsuede material that they call “Tactik” on their retail 2015 Stealth glove), Apco beige (0.8 mm, a “very soft beige microsuede material with lots of usage in the NHL but not the most durable”), Apco grey (1.0 mm), Nash beige (1.0 mm), and Nash sure grip. I believe that the retail Pro 10 glove has grey Nash with a Nash sure grip overlay. The gussets (the space between the palm and the foam padding) are black stretch poly knit. Many people opt for mesh gussets for improved ventilation, but I get the sense that mesh gets chewed up pretty fast. I think that the poly knit will do just fine, and, in fact, it’s a common option on pro and high-end retail gloves. The gussets usually match the palm material, but Easton doesn’t do digital gussets because of durability issues. Black stretch poly knit gussets, -1/4" height. One option intrigued me: a hybrid gusset! It starts with either a poly knit or mesh gusset at the base of the fingers, but the fingertips are covered with the palm material. You actually see it on the retail Pro 10 glove, and it’s also seen on other retail gloves. (Look for it!) I ultimately didn’t go for it because I’ll want to repalm my gloves eventually and don’t want them to be unnecessarily complicated for the repair job. Retail Easton Pro 10 glove, with hybrid gussets. Look closely between the fingers next time... (Photo credit: Total Hockey) Speaking of repalming, when it happens, I’m going with Pat Rivest at Custom Pro Repair. He used to work for Warrior before the Montreal factory closed down, so now he’s opened up a shop. He was their main pro glove person, so he’s as good as you can get for getting a factory-level job. Check out his work on his Facebook page or the Sports 2K thread. COLORS Honestly, being able to have custom colors was the tipping point for making the order. My favorite team glove is the Washington Capitals, such as the Warrior Luxe and the CCM CL, and so I put them into Edmonton Oilers colors with a few tweaks. Some design elements include a white cuff roll (like Jacks 97), white side block (like with the Lighting (classic) and the Devils), bright cuff+flare cuff that contrasts with the back rolls (like Eagle PPF in “design 7” or Jurinko’s Warrior gloves), and outline logo (something that I really liked from classic Eagle gloves). The outline logo is the same thing that I did on my goalie equipment, so there’s that continuity with my custom gear! Contrasting colors to make a statement! One small change that I’d consider is adjusting the binding at different locations. Check out the binding on the retro Calgary gloves: yellow with red cuff, but red with red backrolls. EMBROIDERY There’s the standard embroidery on the cuff and an additional spot on the pinky side padding. “Let’s do this!” is a personal slogan that I’ve added to other custom gear, like my catcher and my mask. There’s an option to add a team logo, and Easton accepted my personal “rice man” logo! CHRISLE9. LET’S DO THIS! “Rice man” logo. ORDERING It feels like the current go-to person for custom hockey gloves is Jesse from The Hockey Shop. He’s done a lot of custom work, especially with Eagle, so his reputation preceded him when I stopped in the store. His industry knowledge, coupled with a personable attitude and professional work ethic, made for an easy process. He answered emails in a timely manner, and he always looked for answers to anything he didn’t know. He was clear to outline what he could and couldn’t deliver, and I appreciated the honesty. I’d be happy to recommend him and direct people to his services. After all the details were in, Easton created a mock-up that required my approval. Once done, the order was in! The factory is in China, and took about three weeks for production and 1 week to ship to me in Canada. Very smooth transaction. Easton’s mockup. CONCLUSION I’m very happy that the option for a custom Easton glove is available to the public, and they’ve delivered very well on making the glove to my specifications. I can’t wait to hit the ice with them! I plan to provide an update about on-ice performance once the season starts up. The ordering process was great with Jesse from The Hockey Shop. A look at his track record reflects his commitment to customer service, and I recommend him for custom work.
  12. In need of a custom jersey for a special event. I bought a blank Bruins military night jersey and was looking to have it custom lettered in the same style as the team. Having a hard time finding someone who can match the style. I am in no rush so I am willing to wait to have it done right. Anyone have any prior experience with a non standard custom jersey or a good place to send it? Having trouble with the pic, here is the link to the gallery http://bruins.nhl.com/club/gallery.htm?id=40058
  13. gordyleech

    Customizing My Goalie Pads

    Hi! I am a bantam minor goaltender playing at the AA level. I have always loved an extremely tight, and flexible feel with my leg pads. I like it when it seems like they're apart of my leg in a sense. One thing I have noticed with Intermediate goalie equipment is that the straps either are made of a nylon, or there are 3 or four leather straps. Which leads to my question. I was wondering if anyone knows how I can add extra leather straps to my leg pads? I currently have the vaughn v5 7270, and I want to add more to the top. If anybody knows how, please let me know. Thank you!
  14. First off this site is awesome with a wealth of information. That being said i cannot for the life of me find a manufacturer that makes something similar to the new E28/kreps in a tapered blade format. I have searched and the only option i can find is the custom T90s from PSHG. I am not opposed to this route except that i cannot find the link directly on their page only through google. I have searched MSH for custom blade threads only to find posts from ~2006 recommending christian and TPS. My question is who if anyone these days makes a tapered blade with a pattern like Kreps/E28 OR Who else takes custom orders. My Mako II is great but I cannot justify 269.99 every time and neither can my wife lol. Thanks, Rich
  15. 2013 Brian’s SubZero Blocker SubZero blocker (front). SubZero blocker (side). The thing about a blocker is that you never really want to think about it. It should just, well, block. As soon as you notice it, then something is off. The stock SubZero blocker is good just as it is: it does the job. I can slip it on and slip it off without any issues. It’s balanced. It’s uncomplicated. And it’s noticeably light. There’s not much more that I could ask from it! The other blocker that I’d consider for its general uncomplicated, good-to-go design is the Vaughn Velocity. (I liked the V4 the best.) As for the G-NETik blocker, for some reason I couldn’t get the same “slip on, slip off” ease as I did with the SubZero. That’s the first thing I noticed. Next, it felt weird on my hand. It was light but felt...off. I later learned that the stock hand position was moved up higher on the board. The reason is to reduce the “double coverage” of the blocker and the forearm and to extend the blocker downward to cover more area beneath the blocker side. Good idea in theory, but I just did not like the balance of the blocker at all. The more I fiddled around with the G-NETik blocker, the more I noticed it. (That’s a bad thing.) I chose the SubZero because I just put it on and was ready to play! I didn’t have to force myself to adjust to anything. STOCK SUBZERO BLOCKER FEATURES I LIKE Palm. My favorite feature is that the palm is tight across the hand and there’s supple backhand padding to secure the blocker to the hand. The design makes the glove easy to slip on and off. I don’t need to depend on wrist straps or additional padding to keep the blocker on. Wide cuff. Slip on, slip off. That’s all I ask. SubZero palm and cuff. Side wall. It’s nice and big and provides great inside coverage! My only annoyance is that the side wall near the nose of the blocker tends to curl outwards rather than staying flush along the entire board. It’s definitely just a cosmetic thing, but that’s an area that could be polished. SubZero's side wall is noticeable from the front. MY SUBZERO BLOCKER MODS Reinforced binding. There’s a lot of wear on the binding along the thumb where the stick meets the blocker. I just wanted to keep things intact as long as possible because it’s very difficult to replace binding. I first saw this feature on Pete Smith’s blockers and subsequently on Vaughn Velocity blockers. Added Jenpro strips along the binding. X-Static airknit finger gussets. Silver has been shown to inhibit bacterial growth. X-Static weaves silver ions into its textile fibers, so bacteria have a harder time growing on its products. With less bacteria in the blocker, there is less hockey smell. Yay for science! No more smelly hockey hands! Screen printing. I copied this feature from Craig Anderson’s gloves, which say #BEASTMODE. “LET’S DO THIS!” is my personal pump-up slogan, and it’s a touch that makes this glove a custom product. We’ve also seen this mod recently on Corey Schneider’s blocker, so I’m not the only one who adds little quotes to my gear! I feel ready to hit the ice! Rice man embroidery. It looks good on the sidewall. I considered placing it on the thumb like Lundqvist, but it would’ve been too hidden to notice. Rice man on the SubZero side wall. Name embroidery. This is the standard position on the cuff. I like the pro italic font! I considered doing my name using screen printing, but I like the look of embroidered text. I would think about putting the name on the middle Jenpro cuff so the embroidery doesn’t look so squished. CHRISLE9 on the blocker’s cuff. 2013 Brian’s G-NETik Catcher G-NETik catcher (front). G-NETik catcher (back). A lot of hype surrounded the release of the G-NETik catcher. (Word on the street was that pros who demoed the glove wouldn’t give it back!) And judging by how quickly people have made the switch to this glove, I think that it’s been a hit with goalies. Brian’s did such a good job on it that I pretty much ordered a stock glove. If I were to identify its strongest features, I’d highlight the closure and the catching/trapping ability. At the same time, I was pleasantly surprised by the SubZero catcher, too. The break felt like a C-shape: you cupped your fingers as you closed the glove. It felt natural too, but in a different way compared to the G-NETik. I also really liked the tee: it was shaped to extend the glove’s reach and the tee was heavily reinforced. I found that I caught pucks that I thought were beyond my reach. The glove has a lot of pocket too, so pucks were trapped very well in this glove. I would’ve been happy to go with the SubZero catcher if the G-NETik didn’t exist. STOCK G-NETIK CATCHER FEATURES I LIKE 35 degree break. The G-NETik’s closure is comfortable and natural. It feels like a U shape - think of folding over a taco. It breaks over the palmar crease. I’d compare it to the Reebok 60 degree break. Scalloped thumb. Otherwise known as the “Finnish thumb” first introduced by the Vaughn Velocity V1 catcher and popularized among Finnish goalies, this feature channels pucks into the pocket. As a result, this glove sucks up pucks like a vacuum! The catcher’s overall shape is like a basket, so there are few flat spots, which results in fewer pop-outs. Double tee. The additional lace between the two tees lets the pocket have more “give”, which helps to cushion pucks and keep them in the catcher. External pro palm. This feature is genius: they added a pro palm (i.e. extra padding) on the outside of the glove. First, this allows the glove to have added protection yet break in a bit more easily: the additional padding doesn’t spread across the hinge at the closure. As a result, there’s a great “game ready” feel. Second, the pro palm is such a common upgrade that Brian’s decided to include it as a stock feature. It’s also covered with nash, which helps to reduce puck spin (and plains looks awesome when there are puck marks!). In my opinion, the external pro palm already makes the glove a great value-packed product off the shelf! G-NETik catcher 35 degree break, scalloped thumb, double tee, and external pro palm. X-Static airknit finger gussets. As I described for the blocker, silver inhibits bacterial growth. Less bacteria means less hockey smell. No more smelly hockey hands! Internal elastic finger strap. I like my gloves to feel snug, and there is an elastic strap that spreads across the fingers and attaches by Velcro at the other end. I like the elastic over the usual two-piece Velcro strap because it reduces redundant materials. This elastic is wide too, so it covers the fingers well and makes for tighter finger channels (if that’s how you like to strap it). MY G-NETIK CATCHER MODS Skate lace. It has more give, which helps trap pucks in the pocket. Some people think skate lace is too soft and reduces “feel”; however, I’m happy that when the puck hits the pocket, it stays there. G-NETik catcher skate lace pocket. Cuff screen printing. I copied this feature from Craig Anderson’s gloves, which say #BEASTMODE. “LET’S DO THIS!” is my personal pump-up slogan, and it’s a touch that makes this glove a custom product. If I was going to do this on my blocker, then I might as well do it on the catcher, too! I wish that the “Made in Canada” cutout wasn’t there, but I otherwise like the look. Another spot to get a pump-up message. Rice man embroidery. It looks good on the backhand. Rice man on the G-NETik backhand. Name embroidery. This is the standard position on the cuff. I still dig the pro italic font! I considered using screen printing, but I like the look of embroidered text. CHRISLE9 on the catcher’s cuff. CONCLUSION I’m very happy with how my custom gear turned out. United Cycle was very helpful in advising me about the products and handling my order. Brian’s not only offers quality products off the shelf, but they also excel in customizing their gear to their customers’ specifications. They did a fantastic job in turning my custom graphic to reality and nailing every modification that I requested. I’d happily recommend United Cycle and Brian’s to anyone who’s looking for goalie equipment. My dream gear is here. This set is a keeper. I understand that the SubZero line will be updated later this year, but that doesn’t bother me. Everything I have works well for me and I’m content. Now, it’s a matter of playing to a level that matches the flashiness of my gear! RELATED LINKS Reviews on the GSBB: ”Official Brian’s Thread” (a running thread about Brian's equipment)Brians Subzero on Ice review (by Chamber33)Another Brians Sub Zero Review (by goalienate)Brian’s SubZero Review (by Big Daddy D)Brian’s G-NETik catcher (a running thread with multiple reviews)Another Brians Gnetik glove review (by khabibissell)Chris Joswiak is Brian’s pro team manager and is an active member of the Goalie Store (Wheelin33). He’s posted his thoughts about... ...the SubZero line....the SubZero pads, blocker, and catch. (video)...the Smart Strap....the Brian's SubZero Smart Strap System. (video)...the G-NETik line....the G-NETik glove....SubZero vs. G-NETik.Several retailers and publications have produced notable reviews: SubZero Pads by Goalie PlusSubZero Pads by Total HockeyBrian's SubZero Goalie Leg Pads Review by Hockey World BlogBrian's SubZero Goalie Leg Pads - Extended Review by Total Hockey (video)First Look: Brian's SubZero Goalie Pads, Blocker & Glove by Pure Hockey (video)Brian's G-NETik by InGoal Magazine (in-depth feature in the October 2012 edition)Brian’s G-NETik Goalie Catch Glove by Total Goalie (video with Chris Joswiak)
  16. bradd94

    Custom Eagle Gloves?

    Looking to get a pair of custom Eagle PPF X905i and can't find a retailer at all. I'm sure there is probably a thread about this but couldn't find one. I don't know how much longer Eagle will be around but I'm not afraid to switch brands after a couple seasons of use and taking care of them. Gloves always make a good birthday present. What place does them and how is the service?
  17. (NOTE: This is a cross post from the original posting at The Goalie Store.) INTRODUCTION Having custom gear is the coolest thing about being a goalie. I’ve been thinking about my dream set since forever, and my recent graduation from school provided a convenient reason to order a grad present to myself. Having a good relationship with my local hockey store helped me try different models and evaluate the many variations in goal equipment, and I decided to order from Brian’s because they were the best fit for me. SELECTION PROCESS With so many product choices available to goalies nowadays, where do I start? Obviously there’s a lot of user-generated online reviews on sites like the Goalie Store, but nothing beats handling the product in person. I got to know the staff at United Cycle, one of the best hockey stores in western Canada, and talked gear with people who were as interested in this stuff as I am. The goal staff was always honest about their thoughts on the latest offerings in the goalie equipment world, and they made consistently good recommendations. Based on their customer service and the relationship I developed with them, I knew that I wanted to order from United Cycle. I wanted to try out as many current models as possible to get a sense of what I liked. I didn’t want to buy something just because a certain pro wore the gear or an advertising campaign promised to make me unbeatable - I needed to make sure that the gear worked for me rather than me adjusting to the gear! (Within reason, of course.) I looked for a company that was open to customizations. Since I’ve demoed many sets over the years, I had accumulated a running list of potential modifications that I could order to make the gear work the best for me. (I’ll admit that I probably could’ve gotten by with stock gear, but if I’m going to go custom, why not personalize it to my playing style?) And finally, I wanted to have custom graphics. I co-designed the winning graphic in the contest hosted by Eagle in 2005, and I knew that I wanted to carry it over with my new set of gear. I would’ve had no hesitation going to Eagle again if they were still in business. My custom set of Eagle gear has served me well for many games and tournaments. After many ice times and conversations and reading, I decided to go with Brian’s because they were the best fit for what I was looking for. Brian’s has been referred to as “the kings of custom” not only because they are receptiveness to customer requests, but also because they invite the challenge! They are the leading company in producing beautiful and elaborate graphics on their equipment - even having enough custom orders to maintain a weekly showcase on their website that spans from 2012 to 2013. An added factor in choosing Brian’s is that I got to visit their factory and meet some of their staff. They have a cool story: their focus is on goalies only, so all of their efforts are directed to making the best products for this niche market. They have a strong heritage dating back to 1984 with the legendary Brian Heaton, and their place in goaltending history is firmly established by the many pros who have and who continue to use their gear. I like that they are a small Canadian company trying to do big things in the industry, so I was happy to support them with my business. Hanging out with Brian’s pro rep Chris Joswiak at the Brian’s factory. CUSTOM GRAPHICS Even though I have my “talon” graphic on my Eagle gear, I wanted to revamp the look. I had tons of ideas but no computer graphic skills, so I looked for someone to help me out. Turns out that there was help available right here on the Goalie Store! I sent a message to mash, the winner of the Simmons UL6 graphic contest, because he submitted a lot of cool designs. His talent was exactly what I was looking for! He has since gone on to work with The Goalie Guild and then Pad Tracker, and he’s even designed graphics for other companies like Brian’s, Battram, and Agatone. He was available to help me and we exchanged a ton of emails. I have to say that he was very patient with me and receptive to all the feedback I sent him. He really went above and beyond what I could’ve hoped for in a mock-up, and I’m happy to recommend him for graphic design work. An incredible mock-up created by mash. THE COMPLETE SET My final set consists of the following: -SubZero pads -SubZero blocker -G-NETik catcher I think that Brian’s did a great job designing the stock product in their SubZero and G-NETik lines, and I made only a few tweaks for the pieces I chose. And not that it matters what pros wear, but it was a bit reassuring to see that Craig Anderson and Andei Vasilevsky picked a similar setup. SubZero blocker, SubZero pads, G-NETik catcher. SubZero blocker, G-NETik catcher. I am so happy with how the custom graphic turned out! It’s bold and eye-catching, and Brian’s pulled it off very well. WOW. Yet another accomplishment in their long run of successfully-executed graphics! My set was the Brian's 06/17/2013 pad of the week and was even featured in a post by InGoal. As this is the dream set of gear, I had to do it in Edmonton Oilers colors as a tribute to my hometown. I learned that Reebok doesn’t sell NHL jerseys in goalie cut to the general public, so I had to go online to find a blank jersey (since the Oilers blank jersey were recently discontinued by Reebok!) and a crest (which took a while to find a good dealer). It took some work, but I finally put together a jersey that I can wear with my gear. (Thanks again to the Team Sales department at United Cycle for assembling the jersey!) A goalie-cut Edmonton Oilers jersey with my last name. I like my gear to have sharp contrast, and I knew that I did not want a white-based color scheme. I was inspired by this custom Brian’s set for “Manzella” and copied the dark base with the white outer roll and white outlines. Pad of the Week 10/15/2013. I like it best when the logos are consistent across all the pieces, and given that the logo would appear against both a blue and a white base, I chose to have the “B” and the “star” in white with the outline in orange. I think it looks really sharp! “B Star” logo on the pads, blocker, and catcher. The personal touches really brought the gear together. I was thrilled by how well the custom “rice man” embroidery and the name embroidery turned out. I requested their pro italic font and I think it looks way cooler than the standard font. This set is certainly customized for me! My rice man cartoon that I’ve doodled for years. CHRISLE9 in the pro italic font. 2013 Brian’s SubZero Pads SubZero pads (front). SubZero pads (profile). Pads receive the most attention of any piece of goaltending equipment, and for good reason - there are so many features and variables to adjust that there are plenty of configurations for goalies to choose from. It’s a matter of knowing the features that matter most to you. I consider myself a hybrid type of goalie, so I looked for soft pads with a lot of flexibility. I didn’t like to be stuck in a clumsy block of foam; I wanted to be able to react as I wanted. I was fortunate to have a good relationship with United Cycle, and I got to demo a lot of gear to try different setups. I had already begun to accumulate a list of what I wanted in a set of pads. Because I already knew that I wanted to go with Brian’s for their custom artwork and there was a lot of hype around the flexibility of the G-NETik line, I was planning to order the G-NETik pad. The United Cycle staff convinced me to give the SubZero a whirl, and I was thoroughly impressed by it! I couldn’t get over how well I moved in it right away, and the weight difference was very noticeable. It challenged me on what I wanted in a pad, and the more I played in it, the more I was convinced that it was the pad for me. If I wasn’t tied to getting a custom graphic, I would’ve also considered the Vaughn Velocity or the CCM Extreme Flex Pro for their flexibility or the Warrior Ritual for its well thought-out design. I tried really hard to make the G-NETik pads work for me. Even with the 3-3-3 A-K-T flex rating, the G-NETik took a while to adjust to them. (Granted, the demos were still pretty new.) It wasn’t as soft as I thought that it would be, and the more I thought about it, I wasn’t sure that I needed my pad to be so flexible that I could squish it into an S-shape. The knee used a cool ripstop material, but I couldn’t get settled in the cradle and kept slipping around the knee block. The external knee flap was relatively rigid and interfered with rotation. Sometimes it would move out of the way, but I just didn’t like it at all. I went for several skates in these pads but just couldn’t dial them in. Feedback so far as shown that G-NETik users took quite some time to break in and adjust to their pads. (Obvious, I guess.) The eventual result is a flexible pad that isn’t mushy. Sounds appealing for sure, but I wasn’t interested in waiting for the demo G-NETik pads to break in to see how they eventually felt when I was immediately comfortable in the SubZero pads. I couldn’t argue with that difference, so that’s how I made my decision! STOCK SUBZERO PADS FEATURES I LIKE Smart Strap. This feature is noteworthy because it challenges convention and rethinks how strapping works. Variations on the number of straps or type of straps doesn’t really matter when you ask, “Do we even need straps at all?!” Using the Velcro and elastic system to secure the pad to the leg is genius. What a game changer in terms of weight and function! NHL goalie Chris Mason explains how it works and demonstrates how he can strap on a pad in about 30 seconds! SubZero Smart Strap. E-Foam Technology. Brian’s uses a high-quality foam that is super light and that no one else has access to. I’m not a person who worries about weight, but it’s significant enough to notice. I regularly replayed sequences in my mind and asked, “Did I really move like that? Did I seriously get to that shot?!” A very noticeable competitive advantage for Brian’s! My 35” pad (34”+2”-1”) probably weighs a little over 4.5 lbs. Pre-curved profile. I didn’t care for stiff, straight-angled, box-type pads because of their inherent lack of flexibility, but the SubZero made me reconsider my position. What was my goal in having a flexible top anyway? To be able to break it in to cover the five-hole in the butterfly. But then if I want the pad to break in to cover the five-hole, doesn’t have a pre-curved pad already accomplish that? This epiphany really dampened my desire for the G-NETik. How much more flexible do I really need the thigh to be if it already does what it needs to do? I also like the pre-curved profile because the thighs don’t interfere with each other when I skate. They follow the contour of my leg so they stay out of each other’s way. SubZero pre-curved profile. Knee cradle. I don’t know what it is about this knee cradle, but it works really well for me. My knee stays in and it’s comfortable. The knee block is firm and has a little groove for the knee when going into the butterfly position. The material has enough friction to stay secure around my knee yet doesn’t inhibit rotation. SubZero knee cradle. MY SUBZERO PADS MODS Sizing. I ordered a 34”+2”-1”, meaning that I added two inches to the thigh rise and removed one inch from the boot. Brian’s has a fitting guide that is a good start, but I wanted to get the maximum height that I could tolerate, so I went with a 34” even though my ankle-to-knee measurement is almost 17”. The +2” on the demo pads was very reasonable, so I went with it. My skate size is small (Bauer Supreme 7000 size 6.5), so I removed one inch from the stock boot so my skate would be flush with the end of the boot. Removing that excess length will give me better control of the pad. Also, given the E Foam Technology, I can rest assured that the pad will have minimal breakdown and shrinkage, so I know that my sizing will stay true for the lifetime of this pad. A-K-T flex 3-3-2. The stock flex on the SubZero is 2-3-2, meaning that the boot (or ankle) and thigh have a medium stiffness rating (“2”) while the knee has a soft stiffness rating (“3”). I prefer to have a soft boot because it lets me feel like I have a sense of control of the pad, so I changed it to the softest rating. The boot probably won’t have the same feel as in a Vaughn Velocity or the CCM Extreme Flex Pro, but it’ll be the closest I get for now. I liked the stock flex rating in the knee and thigh, so I left it as it is. If I had ordered these pads without demoing them, I would’ve ordered a soft thigh as well, but as I discussed above in the pre-curved profile section, that wouldn’t have added much to the pad’s function. Soft stiffness rating (“3”) at the ankle. Sliding toe bridge. This feature was invented by Pete Smith, and who explained it how his website as a design that “allows the toe of the skate blade to angle naturally towards the ice during the butterfly move while keeping the pad snug against the skate. This will relieve stress to ankles and knees while increasing the control and power of all butterfly and deep crouch moves”. Makes sense to me! SubZero boot with 84 degree toe taper and sliding toe bridge. 84 degree toe taper. The stock SubZero toe taper is 78 degree, which is a relatively large taper that allows for a deep crouch and increased mobility. The trade-off, however, is that a “v” gap/taper tends to form between the pads in the butterfly: as the toe pulls down the bottom of the pad, the thigh rise lifts up slightly. (This gap was explained and illustrated by Vaughn product designer Brent Burns in his discussion about the Vaughn Velocity "taper".) Because I’d prefer to eliminate that gap, I chose to have the least amount of taper at the toe. This way, the pad will sit more flush in the butterfly position and close that gap. I have a fairly narrow stance to begin with, so I don’t anticipate any major problems with mobility as the pads will sit on top of my skate. Also, this is a popular option at the pro level so I suspect it doesn’t affect mobility too negatively. SubZero pads in the butterfly position. Outside calf protector. I borrowed this part from the G-NETik pads. I like it because it’s a rigid board that can serve to protect the outer calf...and it can seal the pad against post to prevent squeakers just below the knee. It reminds me of the outside calf wedge panel that Pete Smith introduced in the Smith SP 6000 pads. (Now seen as the “Post Wedge” on the Warrior Ritual pad.] The only change I’d like is to have the outside strap anchored behind this calf protector. As it stands, the calf protector is flush against my leg when I would’ve prefered it to be a bit loose so it can seal against the post. I should’ve clarified this point when I placed the order. G-NETik calf protector on the SubZero pads. Rice man embroidery. I really like how Craig Anderson has the Corvette logo on the back of his thigh rise, and I thought that I’d personalize my pad by placing my rice man character in the same location. I prefer this placement over the outside knee flap that some people have opted for. I would consider adding the name embroidery beneath this character similar to how it was done for Halak and Emery. Rice man on the SubZero thigh rise. Name embroidery. I requested to have the embroidery on the outside of the vertical roll. I really like the contrast between the roll and the embroidery. I also asked to use the pro italic font, which looks really sharp! An option that I’ve seen is to go with screen printing, but I like the look of the embroidered text. CHRISLE9 on the pad’s outer roll.


×