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2nhockey

Lacebite From Powerskating

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I’m a pretty new, self taught player. I went thru the local rink’s Learn to Skate classes, then I jumped onto a developmental team and started playing league games (once a week for about 2-3 months). Then I played a full season on the developmental team (once a week for probably 5 months). During that time I played drop-in 2-3 times a week and would occasionally do stick-and-puck or open skates.  So my skating has come a long ways. I still struggle with certain things (backwards crossunders at speed for example) but I am a competent skater in my league. 

In an effort to get better (in my 40’s so no prospect of college or pro hockey - I play hockey for myself to satisfy my competitive needs and stay in shape) I finally decided to go to a Laura Stamm clinic (next oldest skater was 12, so that was fun).  Learned a ton about my skates and I hope I’ll emerge as a stronger skater for it. No ice locally for another 2-3 weeks so I can’t practice my moves like Jagr for a bit. 

The camp was 2 hours per day on ice running various edge work drills. I have been in my skates for a year and never had pain, discomfort or hot spots etc. I lace my skates (Bauer Supreme 180’s) one eyelet down, cotton laces snug, bordering on loose.

On the second day of camp I had egg sized bruises on the front of both feet/ankles at about the point where the boot transitions from ‘foot’ to ‘ankle’.  Someone told me that was lacebite. Wasn’t super painful but was bothersome. I got some A&R lacebite gel pads and put them in for the last day of camp. Didn’t seem to make a difference. Today, about a week later, the bruises are a little smaller but turning kind of yellow/green. 

Apparently I have lacebite issues. What is the best way to prevent this going forward? Remember I don’t crank my laces down. Also, is it only an issue because of the unique stresses and time on the ice for camp or can I expect more of this? Is it possible my skates/tongue just needs replaced?

Thanks for any wisdom!

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I had/have similar issues, but for me it only shows up when I'm spending a prolonged period doing drills that put pressure on that area. Durning games, it rarely  pops up unless I'm playing 2-3 games in a night. I found changing to Option B skate straps helped.

 

Another option I've used in the past was to add the old CCM/Reebok lace locks on the eyelets around that area. It elevated the laces in that area and releaved the pressure. They're a little tricky to find now that skates don't use them any more, but you can pick them up on eBay. 

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42 minutes ago, puckpilot said:

I had/have similar issues, but for me it only shows up when I'm spending a prolonged period doing drills that put pressure on that area. Durning games, it rarely  pops up unless I'm playing 2-3 games in a night. I found changing to Option B skate straps helped.

 

Another option I've used in the past was to add the old CCM/Reebok lace locks on the eyelets around that area. It elevated the laces in that area and releaved the pressure. They're a little tricky to find now that skates don't use them any more, but you can pick them up on eBay. 

Those Option B skate straps remind me of the ones they used to use on rollerblades. They might work, but man, I don't think I could deal with people chirping me every time I stepped on the ice. 

1 hour ago, 2nhockey said:

I’m a pretty new, self taught player. I went thru the local rink’s Learn to Skate classes, then I jumped onto a developmental team and started playing league games (once a week for about 2-3 months). Then I played a full season on the developmental team (once a week for probably 5 months). During that time I played drop-in 2-3 times a week and would occasionally do stick-and-puck or open skates.  So my skating has come a long ways. I still struggle with certain things (backwards crossunders at speed for example) but I am a competent skater in my league. 

In an effort to get better (in my 40’s so no prospect of college or pro hockey - I play hockey for myself to satisfy my competitive needs and stay in shape) I finally decided to go to a Laura Stamm clinic (next oldest skater was 12, so that was fun).  Learned a ton about my skates and I hope I’ll emerge as a stronger skater for it. No ice locally for another 2-3 weeks so I can’t practice my moves like Jagr for a bit. 

The camp was 2 hours per day on ice running various edge work drills. I have been in my skates for a year and never had pain, discomfort or hot spots etc. I lace my skates (Bauer Supreme 180’s) one eyelet down, cotton laces snug, bordering on loose.

On the second day of camp I had egg sized bruises on the front of both feet/ankles at about the point where the boot transitions from ‘foot’ to ‘ankle’.  Someone told me that was lacebite. Wasn’t super painful but was bothersome. I got some A&R lacebite gel pads and put them in for the last day of camp. Didn’t seem to make a difference. Today, about a week later, the bruises are a little smaller but turning kind of yellow/green. 

Apparently I have lacebite issues. What is the best way to prevent this going forward? Remember I don’t crank my laces down. Also, is it only an issue because of the unique stresses and time on the ice for camp or can I expect more of this? Is it possible my skates/tongue just needs replaced?

Thanks for any wisdom!

Regardless of the skate and its fit if you put enough force on a specific area for an extended period of time repeatedly throughout the course of a few hours, an entire day, or multiple days, you will usually get some bruising due to the repeated pressure exerted on a specific area of your foot or ankle. If you normally don't have issues such as discomfort, bruising, or blisters, I would not worry. 

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How's the pencil test look on the boot you are in now?

I imagine the power skating with Laura had you in positions you were not used to during your previous times on the ice. The amount of time where you had your knees out over your toes putting pressure on that position of your foot likely triggered the tendon stress/damage. 

The usual advice is ice it, use pads, lace outside in, don't use waxed laces, wide soft laces (Howie's are great) to disperse the pressure. But if you're failing the pencil test - your arch is probably too high in the boot you're wearing, and the best advice might be to find a pair of skates that gets your foot deeper to avoid the pressure you're running into when lacing that area.

colins

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30 minutes ago, Nicholas G said:

Those Option B skate straps remind me of the ones they used to use on rollerblades. They might work, but man, I don't think I could deal with people chirping me every time I stepped on the ice. 

They feel similar to rollerblade straps. I've actually ordered some rollerblade ratchet straps to see how they work. The velcro straps, though effective, are starting to stretch after about 8 months. They look like they'll hold for a good while longer, but they'll need to be replaced eventually. 

As for chirping. I've never had anyone on another team say one thing to me. I've had teammates ask about them with curiosity. I've only had one ever make a snide remark, but he's the type that has that "Real Men Don't" attitude. I simply told him it helps my lace bite and acted like I didn't give a shit, because I didn't, and he STFU, because with his stride, he's the last person who should comment on another person's skates and/or skating. For me, I'm at that age now, that if it saves me discomfort and pain and as a consequence, lets me skate better, I'll wear high heels, a too-too, and carry around a fairy wand if I have to. 😛

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There’s huge amounts of useful information about lace bite on this forum and elsewhere.

I used to get it with Bauer S160 skates. I had the Bauer scan and it put me in Vapors which have even less depth, so they should be even worse. Mmmmm. Anyway, I now have Bauer S2 Pro skates, I skate more often now, and I’ve never had lace bite with the new skates.  Higher end skates tend to be more comfortable. When I used the S160 skates, and lace bite appeared, I’d wear a bandage with a gel pad made by Silipos, similar to Bunga pads, u til the lace bite went away. Don’t just skate through lace bite as it will get worse. As said above, wide non waxed laces are good, I liked Howies, I have had issues with QC on the last two pairs of A&R laces, one pair being unfit for purpose ie impossible to put on a skate. Anyway, let’s hope this was a one off for you. 

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7 hours ago, 2nhockey said:

Apparently I have lacebite issues. What is the best way to prevent this going forward? Remember I don’t crank my laces down. Also, is it only an issue because of the unique stresses and time on the ice for camp or can I expect more of this? Is it possible my skates/tongue just needs replaced?

Thanks for any wisdom!

Dealt with this all my life and helped many skaters thru it. 

The clinic most likely put you into a stance you are not normally in ie a little deeper in your stance. This extra pressure could have been the trigger point that caused your lace bite to elevate itself to a noticeable point. Lace bite generally doesn't happen immediately, it's micro trauma happening on the tendon and in between skates your body is trying to heal it. Time on ice, pressure on tendon, age, recovery capability are just some of the factors that determine how you get it and react to it. 

If you are getting it during the class it tells me that you are borderline lacebite the rest of the time ie enough pressure to have it happening but your body is just managing to keep it under control. 

How to fix it:- Bottom line is you have to get the pressure OFF the tendon, this is the most important thing to do for your long term skating health. Lacebite pads, unless they have a channel cut in them for the tendon to sit in, are a waste of time. The options I know that work are: 1: Option B laces. 2: Forsberg pads, downside is you have to tape them to the front of your ankle every time you skate. Make your own from 1/2" pipe insulation. 3: Boots that have enough volume. 4: A new tongue may help if it increases the volume in the boot (ie a thinner tongue) or if the tongue has broken down. 5: Drop eyelets or skate with laces untied 6: Eyelet extenders.

the last option is the one I recommend to skaters, it is cheap, effective and you can use them on any skate. Now you can choose the skate that fit you the best everywhere else (retail skates) and then fix any volume issue.: 

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Excellent advice from Vet88 except that I’ve known gel pads to work for several people including myself. 

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Try lacing from the outside in.  Instead of inside out.  Here is a video showing it.  I had lace bite in my older skates so I started doing this.  I only do this starting 4 eyelets down from the top though so lace inside out till pretty much the curve of the boot then I go outside in. 

 

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12 hours ago, Vet88 said:

The options I know that work are: 1: Option B laces. 2: Forsberg pads, downside is you have to tape them to the front of your ankle every time you skate. Make your own from 1/2" pipe insulation. 3: Boots that have enough volume. 4: A new tongue may help if it increases the volume in the boot (ie a thinner tongue) or if the tongue has broken down. 5: Drop eyelets or skate with laces untied 6: Eyelet extenders.

the last option is the one I recommend to skaters, it is cheap, effective and you can use them on any skate. Now you can choose the skate that fit you the best everywhere else (retail skates) and then fix any volume issue.: 

 

Anyone have a list of the best sources for option 6, Eyelet extenders?

colins

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5 minutes ago, colins said:

 

Anyone have a list of the best sources for option 6, Eyelet extenders?

colins

I make my own using 5mm thick leather offcuts (eg from belt manufacturers) and stainless steel grommets (anything else has corroded on me as I sweat a lot). Can send you details if you want to make your own. But the best commercial ones I have seen and know they work well are those from greatsaves - http://greatsaves.org/skate_lace_extenders.html made from leather instead of plastic.

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4 minutes ago, Vet88 said:

I make my own using 5mm thick leather offcuts (eg from belt manufacturers) and stainless steel grommets (anything else has corroded on me as I sweat a lot). Can send you details if you want to make your own. But the best commercial ones I have seen and know they work well are those from greatsaves - http://greatsaves.org/skate_lace_extenders.html made from leather instead of plastic.

 

Yes - please send me the details. I saw the greatsaves one, only thing I noted was that they seem to be made to use at the top 3 eyelets, and if I was making my own I think I'd want to go one lower and use a curved or 'L' shaped design so that they can be used on eyelets 3/4/5. My son never laces eyelet 1 and I don't think there's any issue with bite up at eyelet 2, the pressure is around eyelets 4 and 5 on his Tacks.

 

colins

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@Vet88 knows what he’s talking about. He has a lot of info and he has helped me before. The thing that helped me the most and was comfortable was to stop skating for just over a month (I iced the area every day) and let it heal. I now use a bunga (gel) pad on my left foot and have had no problems since. 

 

I tried using a bunga pad when the area was still sore and it didn’t work. You have to let it heal completely then start using a bunga pad. 

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9 hours ago, strosedefence34 said:

Try lacing from the outside in.  Instead of inside out.  Here is a video showing it.  I had lace bite in my older skates so I started doing this.  I only do this starting 4 eyelets down from the top though so lace inside out till pretty much the curve of the boot then I go outside in. 

 

Still not sure how this alleviates lace bite, the pressure is still the same on the foot, it is basically just upside down lacing, what am I missing?  The lace goes through the same pattern as inside out, just in opposite order.

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Really appreciate the advice and feedback. 

Not exactly sure how to conduct a proper pencil test but what I did... pulled my laces and flopped the tongues out of the way. Put the skates on barefoot then tried to get my foot as deep in the skate as I could, then slid a pencil down the skate feeling for contact. 

Counting from the top on my left skate there was contact on eyelets 3, 4, and 5. On my right skate, which had (and still has) the bigger bruise, there was contact on eyelets 3, 4, 5, and 6. 

No LHS here but my daughter has a tournament coming up in Minneapolis and there are shops there. Are lace extenders a ‘while you wait’ operation or is it pretty involved? Should I send the skates off? Is there a measurement process?

Thanks again for the help. Much appreciated. 

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14 hours ago, BenBreeg said:

Still not sure how this alleviates lace bite, the pressure is still the same on the foot, it is basically just upside down lacing, what am I missing?  The lace goes through the same pattern as inside out, just in opposite order.

It just spreads the pressure out more evenly.  Also it gives you slightly more space (we are talking mm) between the tongue and laces since it sits on top of the boot/ eyelet.  I feel like it's hard to explain but it defiantly worked for me.

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7 hours ago, 2nhockey said:

Really appreciate the advice and feedback. 

Not exactly sure how to conduct a proper pencil test but what I did... pulled my laces and flopped the tongues out of the way. Put the skates on barefoot then tried to get my foot as deep in the skate as I could, then slid a pencil down the skate feeling for contact. 

Counting from the top on my left skate there was contact on eyelets 3, 4, and 5. On my right skate, which had (and still has) the bigger bruise, there was contact on eyelets 3, 4, 5, and 6. 

No LHS here but my daughter has a tournament coming up in Minneapolis and there are shops there. Are lace extenders a ‘while you wait’ operation or is it pretty involved? Should I send the skates off? Is there a measurement process?

Thanks again for the help. Much appreciated. 

 

That's all the pencil test is. And I think you've found the crux of your issue. Your boot is not deep enough for the height of your arches or volume of your foot.

Lace extenders are a work around, if you really love how your skate fits (other than the depth issue) and they take the pressure off, you could consider them permanent.

If you can't find a retail skate that solves the depth problem while still fitting your foot everywhere else, the next option is to go for a full custom, with extended facing if necessary to add the volume you need. Gets expensive!

 

Image result for skate pencil test

 

colins

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12 minutes ago, strosedefence34 said:

It just spreads the pressure out more evenly.  Also it gives you slightly more space (we are talking mm) between the tongue and laces since it sits on top of the boot/ eyelet.  I feel like it's hard to explain but it defiantly worked for me.

The lace enters the boot outside in, exits the eyelet on the inside, crosses the tongue, and enters the other side on the outside.  The lace is still crossing the tongue travelling from an outside to an inside eyelet, it is the same pattern just instead of inside-outside it is outside-inside.  The only difference is how you perceive you are lacing it, the order you traverse the pattern.  If you wanted to change the pressure, you would have to lace so that the lace never exited the inside before crossing.

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18 hours ago, 2nhockey said:

No LHS here but my daughter has a tournament coming up in Minneapolis and there are shops there. Are lace extenders a ‘while you wait’ operation or is it pretty involved? Should I send the skates off? Is there a measurement process?

I have never heard of a LHS stocking them as they seem to be considered a niche item, somebody correct me if I am wrong. Buy them online from here http://greatsaves.org/skate_lace_extenders.html and you can fit them yourself. 

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Yeah, just to follow up on that... so I called the closest thing I have to an LHS (6 hours away) and he understood what I was trying to accomplish and the problem I was having. He looked at the Great Saves product and cautioned it looked like it wasn’t meant to go on the curve part of my boot where my troubles were (eyelets 3-6). Any thoughts on that?

i also talked to someone that really knows his stuff up in Minneapolis and he knew what I was talking about and said he’d only ever seen them on custom skates. 

Thanks for the help. 

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30 minutes ago, 2nhockey said:

Yeah, just to follow up on that... so I called the closest thing I have to an LHS (6 hours away) and he understood what I was trying to accomplish and the problem I was having. He looked at the Great Saves product and cautioned it looked like it wasn’t meant to go on the curve part of my boot where my troubles were (eyelets 3-6). Any thoughts on that?

i also talked to someone that really knows his stuff up in Minneapolis and he knew what I was talking about and said he’d only ever seen them on custom skates. 

Thanks for the help. 

 

You can use one of these. They're replacements for the old CCM lace lock system, but I put them on the third eyelet down, and it raises the laces just like those eyelet extenders do. 

 

https://www.ebay.ca/itm/CCM-Helmet-Hockey-Skate-Lock-Replacement-Eyelet-Repair-Fix-Hardware-Inline-Ice/262744209403?hash=item3d2cc677fb:g:FREAAOSwxp9W8ya6

 

https://www.ebay.ca/itm/Reebok-Hockey-Skate-Lock-Replacement-Eyelet-Repair-Fix-Hardware-Inline-Ice/262975040573?hash=item3d3a88ac3d:g:Fp8AAOSwONBZESg1

 

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+1 for these, I have used them on other skates to alleviate lace bite. Downside is they are getting harder to get (my understanding is they are not made anymore) and they break with puck impacts and over time. If you go this route get a few pairs so you have spares..

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Based on Vet88's advice and the comments on this thread, I mocked up some test eyelets extenders for my son's Tacks. Going to give them a try tomorrow. If they work I may get some thicker belt leather and make a more permanent solution.

 

vzYCq5L.jpg

HruWJxo.jpg

 

colins

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9 hours ago, 2nhockey said:

That looks very good and works on the curve of the boot. What material did you use?

 

It's leather I cut from a purse my wife donated to the cause. It's doubled over to add thickness. When I pull on the eyelets it has a bit of stretch to it but it feels sturdy. My guess is it's going to be OK for testing, but I'll need some thicker material like Vet88 recommended - belt leather which is 4 or 5mm in thickness.

The eyelets are grommets that came with the press I bought off Amazon for about $80 CDN. Very handy to be able to set your own eyelets. I also have Blademaster eyelets and washers but they have long barrels and wouldn't work for this thickness of material.

Haven't tried them yet - he's staying off the ice until the problem is 100% healed. He started doing these exercises which another modsquad user posted before - has anyone else had success with this healing their lacebite soreness sooner?

 

colins

 

Edited by colins
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