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VH Footwear/TRUE by Scott Van Horne

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Is/was there that much of a need for a removable tendon guard? Seems like those have been the Achilles heel for True.

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I've never replaced the tendon guard on any of the Easton Mako skates I used for ice or inline. I wore out some of the skates, but the tendon guards were still fine. I haven't had any issues with the True TF9 tendon guards, but I've only used them for about a year.

On the other hand, I've seen posts of broken tendon guards from other companies (mainly Bauer) and in those cases, I'm sure the skate owners would've appreciated an easily replaceable tendon guard. So, I'm sort of on the fence. If the tendon guard is durable and well made, then no, I don't think it needs to be replaceable. If it's likely to break during the life of the skate, then being able to easily replace it is nice. 

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My one tendon guard is loose on my TF7s. Is this something I can fix on my own somehow? 

It’s not falling off, but has some wiggle side to side that I’d like to stop before it gets problematic. 

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Howdy,

6 hours ago, start_today said:

My one tendon guard is loose on my TF7s. Is this something I can fix on my own somehow? 

It’s not falling off, but has some wiggle side to side that I’d like to stop before it gets problematic. 

Depends on whether its loose or the screw is snapped.  If its just loose, pull the inside foam pad out/aside and use the tool they provided with the skates to tighten up the screw.

If the screw is snapped (this happened to me), then you'll need a replacement screw.  True can send you some, or you can cut down a flat head hardware store screw to length.  I can't remember the thread specs, but if you need them ask and I'll dig them up.

Mark

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1 hour ago, marka said:

Howdy,

Depends on whether its loose or the screw is snapped.  If its just loose, pull the inside foam pad out/aside and use the tool they provided with the skates to tighten up the screw.

If the screw is snapped (this happened to me), then you'll need a replacement screw.  True can send you some, or you can cut down a flat head hardware store screw to length.  I can't remember the thread specs, but if you need them ask and I'll dig them up.

Mark

Drill out the screw and put in a copper. 

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Hi everyone. 

I just got scanned for new svh custom skates and was curious if I'm supposed to get an email from True about my order? Saw on a video, albeit it was 3yrs ago, that the guy got an email shortly after. 

tia

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Another quick question...I tend to pronate a bit on my right foot.  Should I have mentioned this during the scan/ordering process or does this get looked at after the skates have been made?  I opted for the holders to be unmounted as I might be going the LS edge holders route.

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You can add notes when your order to call out pain points or issues you might have. But I am going to leave that question to a retailer who does True fits and would know better.

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Has anyone tried the true tongues with the met guard? I always suffer from lace bite because my ankles are so skinny. It's not bad yet in my customs but I was wondering if these tongues might really help eliminate it? Even in my customs I have to crank the laces pretty tight to get a good heel and ankle lock. 

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24 minutes ago, FR0GGY33 said:

Has anyone tried the true tongues with the met guard? I always suffer from lace bite because my ankles are so skinny. It's not bad yet in my customs but I was wondering if these tongues might really help eliminate it? Even in my customs I have to crank the laces pretty tight to get a good heel and ankle lock. 

I use the felt t-guard tongue (https://www.hockeyvancouver.ca/products/true-t-guard-felt-replacement-skate-tongues) and haven't had any issues with lace bite. I don't really tighten my skates at all until I get to the third eyelet, the rest are just barely snug against the tongue.

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2 hours ago, dasuchin said:

I use the felt t-guard tongue (https://www.hockeyvancouver.ca/products/true-t-guard-felt-replacement-skate-tongues) and haven't had any issues with lace bite. I don't really tighten my skates at all until I get to the third eyelet, the rest are just barely snug against the tongue.

I use the same tongue on my TF9s and also ordered it from Hockey Vancouver. They did free embroidery which was pretty sweet, but that may have been a Covid thing. Like you, I don't have issues with lace bite, and don't crank the laces, just leave them taught

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9 hours ago, FR0GGY33 said:

Has anyone tried the true tongues with the met guard? I always suffer from lace bite because my ankles are so skinny. It's not bad yet in my customs but I was wondering if these tongues might really help eliminate it? Even in my customs I have to crank the laces pretty tight to get a good heel and ankle lock. 

I own them and I used them 2-3 times and then put them away in storage.  I'm sure they provide the protection that they advertise, but they were a bit too stiff for my liking and limited my ankle flexion, so I went back to the traditional tongues that came with the boot.  I've never gotten lace-bite in my Trues, and I wear shins over tongues, so the Meta-guard isn't really adding much in protection.

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On 9/19/2022 at 11:05 PM, shoot_the_goalie said:

I own them and I used them 2-3 times and then put them away in storage.  I'm sure they provide the protection that they advertise, but they were a bit too stiff for my liking and limited my ankle flexion, so I went back to the traditional tongues that came with the boot.  I've never gotten lace-bite in my Trues, and I wear shins over tongues, so the Meta-guard isn't really adding much in protection.

Thanks for the responses guys. I was worried about the meta-guard effecting flexion. I’m jealous you guys don’t have to tie your skates tight. Even in my trues I have to crank them down to get heel lock 😂

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12 hours ago, FR0GGY33 said:

Thanks for the responses guys. I was worried about the meta-guard effecting flexion. I’m jealous you guys don’t have to tie your skates tight. Even in my trues I have to crank them down to get heel lock 😂

Finger tight at best with standard laces. Sounds like you might need to bake your skates again to get a better fit. 

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2 hours ago, PBH said:

Finger tight at best with standard laces. Sounds like you might need to bake your skates again to get a better fit. 

I've baked them twice, skated on them six times. Honestly I am disappointed, they feel sloppy, like they're a half size too big 😞

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29 minutes ago, FR0GGY33 said:

I've baked them twice, skated on them six times. Honestly I am disappointed, they feel sloppy, like they're a half size too big 😞

Lower the tongue it'll keep your toes down and closer to the end of the toe cap. 

When they were baked/rebaked did they do the saran wrap technique? If not, that's what you need to do. 

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3 hours ago, Sniper9 said:

Lower the tongue it'll keep your toes down and closer to the end of the toe cap. 

When they were baked/rebaked did they do the saran wrap technique? If not, that's what you need to do. 

I have lowered the tongue. It goes almost to the end of my toes. This definitely helps but it still feels roomy. 
 

The first time I baked them I did the wrap, the second time I cranked the skates tight with the laces as per guidance from the shop I bought them from. 
 

btw thanks for the input guys. Like I said I’m so far a little disappointed with how custom skates are fitting.

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33 minutes ago, FR0GGY33 said:

I have lowered the tongue. It goes almost to the end of my toes. This definitely helps but it still feels roomy. 
 

The first time I baked them I did the wrap, the second time I cranked the skates tight with the laces as per guidance from the shop I bought them from. 
 

btw thanks for the input guys. Like I said I’m so far a little disappointed with how custom skates are fitting.

I was in this same situation. I made sure my second bake that the Saran Wrap wasn’t just around the top 3 eyelets but also down to the fore foot as much as possible. I also had to get powerfoot inserts to really take up the space in the toe cap. 
 

Also sounds like maybe your best off trying the catalyst skates. They seem to have more padding in the ankle area so it takes up more space. It sounds like the skate I’ve been looking for since the my makos crapped out. 

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3 hours ago, FR0GGY33 said:

I have lowered the tongue. It goes almost to the end of my toes. This definitely helps but it still feels roomy. 
 

The first time I baked them I did the wrap, the second time I cranked the skates tight with the laces as per guidance from the shop I bought them from. 
 

btw thanks for the input guys. Like I said I’m so far a little disappointed with how custom skates are fitting.

I'd be questioning the make of the skates if they are too big thru the heel area, and potentially not enough volume if you are getting lace bite from tying them tight. Imho opinion customs shouldn't come to you with excessive space in the heel area, it is never going to go away. I know of a number of skaters with very narrow heels who have had issues with customs and have gone back for multiple remakes.

As to the problem you have, have you tried clamping the skate underneath the ankle bone? The problem with tying your skates tight is it does not change the profile of the skate in this area and the saran wrap method also struggles to pull the skate inwards in this area. A clamp will definitely pull the skate inwards and will result in a much tighter heel fit.

If you pronate at all (very common with narrow heels and high insteps) you can also try an alternate method that will be like a custom modification to the boot which will help your pronation (you need someone to help you do this). Instead of clamping the heel area, use a heat gun to heat the boot under and around the ankle area on the inside of the skate only (don't heat anywhere else), then put the skate on, lace it up and lie on the floor and turn your foot so the outside of the boot is lying flat on the floor (the inside of the boot is facing upwards). Use something, like books, so you can rest the blade on them to hold the blade level to the floor, this helps to hold the skate level to the floor and not move around. Have someone, ideally in bare feet or socks, gently stand on the inside of the boot around and under the ankle area. What this does is push the boot into your ankle and heel and forms it around your foot shape, this removes all negative space on the inside of the ankle / heel. Consequently any negative space that was on the outside of the ankle / heel is filled by the foot itself, what you have effectively done is offset the foot outwards from the center line of the boot. This is a similar result to moving the holder inwards to help offset pronation. Also by lying on the floor you help to put the ankle into a neutral alignment position which you then form the boot around it, this makes a significant difference to the support the boot will give your ankle (to hold it straight) versus a sitting / standing position in which you may be pronating. Ironically this method only really works in boots that are too wide for you.

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18 hours ago, Vet88 said:

I'd be questioning the make of the skates if they are too big thru the heel area, and potentially not enough volume if you are getting lace bite from tying them tight. Imho opinion customs shouldn't come to you with excessive space in the heel area, it is never going to go away. I know of a number of skaters with very narrow heels who have had issues with customs and have gone back for multiple remakes.

As to the problem you have, have you tried clamping the skate underneath the ankle bone? The problem with tying your skates tight is it does not change the profile of the skate in this area and the saran wrap method also struggles to pull the skate inwards in this area. A clamp will definitely pull the skate inwards and will result in a much tighter heel fit.

If you pronate at all (very common with narrow heels and high insteps) you can also try an alternate method that will be like a custom modification to the boot which will help your pronation (you need someone to help you do this). Instead of clamping the heel area, use a heat gun to heat the boot under and around the ankle area on the inside of the skate only (don't heat anywhere else), then put the skate on, lace it up and lie on the floor and turn your foot so the outside of the boot is lying flat on the floor (the inside of the boot is facing upwards). Use something, like books, so you can rest the blade on them to hold the blade level to the floor, this helps to hold the skate level to the floor and not move around. Have someone, ideally in bare feet or socks, gently stand on the inside of the boot around and under the ankle area. What this does is push the boot into your ankle and heel and forms it around your foot shape, this removes all negative space on the inside of the ankle / heel. Consequently any negative space that was on the outside of the ankle / heel is filled by the foot itself, what you have effectively done is offset the foot outwards from the center line of the boot. This is a similar result to moving the holder inwards to help offset pronation. Also by lying on the floor you help to put the ankle into a neutral alignment position which you then form the boot around it, this makes a significant difference to the support the boot will give your ankle (to hold it straight) versus a sitting / standing position in which you may be pronating. Ironically this method only really works in boots that are too wide for you.

This sounds like the LAST thing I'd want to do after dropping $1,000 or so on custom skates.

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27 minutes ago, beedee said:

This sounds like the LAST thing I'd want to do after dropping $1,000 or so on custom skates.

Why? If you are going to make a comment then at least back it up.

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19 hours ago, Vet88 said:

I'd be questioning the make of the skates if they are too big thru the heel area, and potentially not enough volume if you are getting lace bite from tying them tight. Imho opinion customs shouldn't come to you with excessive space in the heel area, it is never going to go away. I know of a number of skaters with very narrow heels who have had issues with customs and have gone back for multiple remakes.

As to the problem you have, have you tried clamping the skate underneath the ankle bone? The problem with tying your skates tight is it does not change the profile of the skate in this area and the saran wrap method also struggles to pull the skate inwards in this area. A clamp will definitely pull the skate inwards and will result in a much tighter heel fit.

If you pronate at all (very common with narrow heels and high insteps) you can also try an alternate method that will be like a custom modification to the boot which will help your pronation (you need someone to help you do this). Instead of clamping the heel area, use a heat gun to heat the boot under and around the ankle area on the inside of the skate only (don't heat anywhere else), then put the skate on, lace it up and lie on the floor and turn your foot so the outside of the boot is lying flat on the floor (the inside of the boot is facing upwards). Use something, like books, so you can rest the blade on them to hold the blade level to the floor, this helps to hold the skate level to the floor and not move around. Have someone, ideally in bare feet or socks, gently stand on the inside of the boot around and under the ankle area. What this does is push the boot into your ankle and heel and forms it around your foot shape, this removes all negative space on the inside of the ankle / heel. Consequently any negative space that was on the outside of the ankle / heel is filled by the foot itself, what you have effectively done is offset the foot outwards from the center line of the boot. This is a similar result to moving the holder inwards to help offset pronation. Also by lying on the floor you help to put the ankle into a neutral alignment position which you then form the boot around it, this makes a significant difference to the support the boot will give your ankle (to hold it straight) versus a sitting / standing position in which you may be pronating. Ironically this method only really works in boots that are too wide for you.

Wow, thanks for the detailed reply! I'll have to look into the lying down mold method. I don't get lacebite from lack of volume but from too much volume. I end up tying too tight to compensate for it. I don't find them too big in the heel area but definitely in the toe area. There's too much space above my toes (I'm looking into ordering some powerfeet for this) and they just feel too long, like they're a half a size big. I'm going back into the shop this week so we'll see what they have to say. 🤞 that I'm doing something wrong and it is not the skates that are the problem. 

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