Jump to content
Slate Blackcurrant Watermelon Strawberry Orange Banana Apple Emerald Chocolate Marble
Slate Blackcurrant Watermelon Strawberry Orange Banana Apple Emerald Chocolate Marble
aal

Skate Lacing Pattern

Recommended Posts

I notice two patterns used to lace skates; either starting with the lace on top of the first skate toe eyelets, or starting with the lace underneath. (I hope this makes sense.) I've tried both, and can get the boot a little tighter at the forefoot with the lace starting underneath. I see most people having the lace on top though. What's the thought about what's best, or is it just personal preference?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

there's a bit more to that - thanks TLB for enlightning me on this :)

when you go outside-in it leaves more volume in the skate comparing with inside-out

so pretty much everybody goes inside-out first 3-4 eyelets because rarely people have volume issues there unless skates just don't fit period

but many people find that lacing elets 4 & up with outside-in pattern helps with volume issues (and sometimes as a result forward flex issues) + you can usually go tighter

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've found going from out-side in helps to keep the lace tighter (also harder to undo) as they tension of the lace is holding the eyelet down, clampling it on to the lace as it goes to the next eyelet. Personally I just use inside out all the way up my skate.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
there's a bit more to that - thanks TLB for enlightning me on this :)

when you go outside-in it leaves more volume in the skate comparing with inside-out

so pretty much everybody goes inside-out first 3-4 eyelets because rarely people have volume issues there unless skates just don't fit period

but many people find that lacing elets 4 & up with outside-in pattern helps with volume issues (and sometimes as a result forward flex issues) + you can usually go tighter

Actually, that isnt true. My s15's are lacking a bit in the volume area, so I tried this. All you are doing is reversing the pattern, which creates no more volume. The lace may be going in from the outside, but it still comes out from the inside....which is exactly the same as going in from the inside and out from the outside. If you look, you will see the same number of times the laces coming to or from the inside either way. It is merely reversing direction and creating no more volume..

Edited by eric42434224

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the replies. That's an interesting shoe lace site. It looks like I've been using the regular criss cross lace, except for the first eylets where I've gone over.

Also, out of curiosity, how many people don't lace the top eyelets? I always used to, but just started not to and I think I like the mobility better.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I used to leave the top eyelet undone on my Vapors. I just got some One75s and have tried it both ways (I've only skated on them twice) not sure which way I like better with those.

When I did it on my Vapors it felt like I was smoother skating backwards and in my transitions/turns from backwards to forward skating (I play D), but that could have just been in my head.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To illustrate that fallacy of changing the lacing pattern to create more volume.:

CIMG3046.jpg

If you look at each eyelet, the same exact pattern occurs, only the direction in which you laced it changes. There is the same amount of contact with the tounge in each scenario. The lace must enter or leave each side of the eyelet each time, no matter what, therefore creating the same amount of contact with the tounge, anf therefore the same volume. Changing the direction does not change the volume. Maybe there is another way to lace them that I dont know about, but going outside in to create volume is a myth. Merely reversing direction doesnt do anything.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

http://images.sportsline.com/u/gettyimages...23_1024x768.jpg

The only thing I was intially talking about is the first lace. If you look at the photo of Avery close, you see that he has the first lace going from the insides of the eyelets out, whereas I think most skates are laced with the first lace going outside in. After that, it looks like most people just criss cross. I hadn't realized there's other ways also.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My first 3 eyelets arent pulled tight at all...the s15 doesnt have too much height in the toebox, so I leave them pretty loose. I tie them tight for the nextt 4 eyelets, then less tight the next one, and pretty loose the top one. It just takes a bit of experimentation to find the right set up.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
http://images.sportsline.com/u/gettyimages...23_1024x768.jpg

The only thing I was intially talking about is the first lace. If you look at the photo of Avery close, you see that he has the first lace going from the insides of the eyelets out, whereas I think most skates are laced with the first lace going outside in. After that, it looks like most people just criss cross. I hadn't realized there's other ways also.

I believe what you're seeing is the fact that when skates are laced up and put in the box that first eyelet is laced outside-in, however once people start swapping out the stock pair of laces some probably repeat what they saw in the box and some just don't really pay attention to it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I thought the whole purpose of starting at the toe with an underneath start (like Avery's pic) was to reduce the lace getting cut there from skate blades...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i start with the lace under but i skip the bottom eyelit. it gives my toes alot more room due to the width of my foot. i would suggest trying this if the toebox gives you problems.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The only website you need...

I'd post a picture of my lacing setup, but it's pretty surreal. I damn near caused a work stoppage the last time I had them profiled... it's a combination of Bushwalk, Lydiard, a two-stage lace-lock and some basic criss-cross. Looks like a mess, but I can skate relatively pain-free.

To illustrate that fallacy of changing the lacing pattern to create more volume.:

...

Changing the direction does not change the volume. Maybe there is another way to lace them that I dont know about, but going outside in to create volume is a myth. Merely reversing direction doesnt do anything.

There absolutely is a way to cheat a little extra volume into your skates: see Bushwalk and Lydiard. If you do it right, you not only gain a bit of volume but dissipate the pressure across the tongue and top of your foot instead of concentrating it on the X's.

Edited by Law Goalie

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The only website you need...

I'd post a picture of my lacing setup, but it's pretty surreal. I damn near caused a work stoppage the last time I had them profiled... it's a combination of Bushwalk, Lydiard, a two-stage lace-lock and some basic criss-cross. Looks like a mess, but I can skate relatively pain-free.

To illustrate that fallacy of changing the lacing pattern to create more volume.:

...

Changing the direction does not change the volume. Maybe there is another way to lace them that I dont know about, but going outside in to create volume is a myth. Merely reversing direction doesnt do anything.

There absolutely is a way to cheat a little extra volume into your skates: see Bushwalk and Lydiard. If you do it right, you not only gain a bit of volume but dissipate the pressure across the tongue and top of your foot instead of concentrating it on the X's.

Im sure there is a way....just that reversing the direction is not one. As my s15's arent giving me any problems due to volume, I just lace them up the "normal" way. If volume ever becomes an issue I will surely try it!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The only website you need...

I'd post a picture of my lacing setup, but it's pretty surreal. I damn near caused a work stoppage the last time I had them profiled... it's a combination of Bushwalk, Lydiard, a two-stage lace-lock and some basic criss-cross. Looks like a mess, but I can skate relatively pain-free.

Can you elaborate? I'd love to relieve a bit of pressure over the tongue as well as lock down the laces across my ankle.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Outside-in, does give you more volume because you can't pull a lace tight enough to bend the top of the skate over as far on stiff skates. We aren't talking 2", we're talking a MM or so. It's not a fix for poor fitting skates, it's a fix for a pressure point(s). About 90% of the people I recommend it to, don't think it works, try it... and find that it works.

About a month ago I argued with puck_it over it, he finally tried it on his one95s and it helped.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The only website you need...

I'd post a picture of my lacing setup, but it's pretty surreal. I damn near caused a work stoppage the last time I had them profiled... it's a combination of Bushwalk, Lydiard, a two-stage lace-lock and some basic criss-cross. Looks like a mess, but I can skate relatively pain-free.

Can you elaborate? I'd love to relieve a bit of pressure over the tongue as well as lock down the laces across my ankle.

Basically, just look at Ian Fieggen's site and play around until you find what works. In my case, I found that using Lydiard worked well on spots where I needed maximum clearance from the footbed and had a little width to play with; Bushwalk was better when in general. However, both methods tend to be hard to tighten and don't hold well, so using a couple of lace-locks was a necessity.

Again, just play around with the options until something works. You may end up with a different pattern on each foot.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I did try it and felt zero difference, but if it works for some good for them. I wonder though if some of it is a placebo effect.

I wonder if it's not working for you because the skates don't fit you in such a way that it makes a difference. You know people solve fit issues by trying thinner socks too and it works, in SOME cases. If I put on a one90, no matter what lacing pattern I use, it's not going to help.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I played around with some lacing. Going to try outside-in over the forefoot to relieve some pressure, then inside-out across the arch as I like it a bit more snug there, then a lace lock up top skipping the top eyelet. It feels better now, more support across the arch, less pressure on the forefoot, and definitely a lot more snug across the ankle, but doesn't seem to cause issues when I flex forward. I'm curious to see how it works on the ice. Thanks for the tips!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The transition from outside-in to inside-out is great where you need something ultra low, it helps some with MINOR heel slippage when used at the elbow of the skate.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I did try it and felt zero difference, but if it works for some good for them. I wonder though if some of it is a placebo effect.

I wonder if it's not working for you because the skates don't fit you in such a way that it makes a difference. You know people solve fit issues by trying thinner socks too and it works, in SOME cases. If I put on a one90, no matter what lacing pattern I use, it's not going to help.

The skates I use are definitely not deep enough, but I havent had any negative side effects like lace bite. Maybe that is why. If they dont hurt with regular lace pattern, they wont hurt with a mm more depth....hence me not noticing any difference.

Edited by eric42434224

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Exactly, it's getting rid of minor pressure points. It's not going to make a skate that doesn't fit, fit. Although it might make it more tolerable.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...