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boo10

Toe Plugs for Length Adjustment

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I know True/VH skates sometimes use toe plugs for length adjustments, but has anyone seen this done with Bauer or CCM skates?

I have weird feet, (average width, very high instep, left 7.5, right 7.75).  I'm the perfect candidate for custom skates, but my first attempt with True didn't go so well.  I'd really prefer to stay in the $500-$700 range anyway.  Bauer scanner tells me my stock fit is an 8D Supreme.  8D fits the right foot perfectly, but left is a tad long.  I could get by no problem, but thought a plug might be a good idea.  I have Power foot inserts, but I found that when I use them, about half the time my foot will cramp up.  I think they make me subconsciously curl my toes.

I have tried skating in 7.5D Tacks, Ribcor Jetspeed and Supreme and 7.5EE Vapor, but my right foot cramps from my toes pressing against the cap. Vapors were ok for length, but too shallow and too wide.

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2 hours ago, shoot_the_goalie said:

You could use toe inserts, but I would use them as a last resort.  I would find a really good boot fitter and fit for your smaller foot first, then stretch for your bigger foot.  

I did try stretching a tech mesh skate a few years ago, but they really weren't able to get any extra length, (they did get some width).  I just assumed that the newer materials don't lend themselves to stretching for length.  

 

33 minutes ago, Buzz_LightBeer said:

Do the opposite, put toe lifts under your insoles. 

I hadn't really thought of that, but I'll give it a shot.

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I have never got good results stretching for length, there are parts of the boot that are not designed to move that way. But there are options, they are just harder to do.

1: Work with the toe cap. You need to heat the front of the boot up and then pull the toe cap out by 1mm - 2mm. You need to be very careful doing this because you can pull the toe cap right out and destroy the boot. I am also not sure how this would work now with different manufacturing processes, I know an ex pro who finished playing 5 years ago and this is what he got done to every boot he had for his right foot. I have never done it myself.

2: Punch the heel out. If you have a curved heel shape then by punching the heel out you can gain another 1mm - 2mm of length in a boot (like a supreme) that has a straight heel shape. But the heel is a hard area to punch out because of curves and the stiffness of the boot in that area.

3: Punch the toe cap out. A special tool needs to be used, customworx have made one so maybe reach out to JR and ask him for contact details of a shop that will have one.

And with a mix of these you can add around 1/2 a size to the boot. 

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The toe cap is stitched to the boot sides and also fixed by 2 front rivets (may be 4, depends on the model). Don't see how it can be punched out, but I think that you can remove the rivets, cut the threads and move the toe cap a bit to the front if there will be some place to stitch it back and fix with the rivets.

I've replaced the broken toe cap on my skates, so I think this is possible. But not the easiest way, if I had the same problem, I would go with toe inserts.

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What about Graf customs? They may end up around your price range as well. Knowing your preference for Micron 10-90s, they might be able to replicate that boot’s fit and flex. I’ve seen them do the flex notch

and their Edmonton Special V-Cut skates feature a flex notch similar to the one on the Air 90s:

csm_2597-20_front-large_7c52f36cf7.jpg

...

That way you could get the proper size for each skate and a mix of more recent technology and your favorite old school boots’ features.

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