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flip12

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flip12 last won the day on May 16

flip12 had the most liked content!

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About flip12

  • Birthday 03/16/1984

Equipment

  • Skates
    MLX, Graf 701, Graf 501
  • Stick
    Leino SE16
  • Gloves
    Slava Kozlov TPS HGT, AK27
  • Helmet
    Bauer HH5000L, CCM cage
  • Pants
    Tackla Air 9000 with suspenders
  • Shoulder Pads
    Warrior AX1
  • Elbow Pads
    Reebok 20K
  • Shin Pads
    Jofa 3195
  • Hockey Bag
    Graf

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Copenhagen, Denmark
  • Interests
    Soviet Hockey, IT, Literature, Architecture, Biking, Food+Drink, Philosophy.
  • Spambot control
    753459201

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  1. It sounds like you pay per category per brand/logo. This specific scenario played out just after Bauer bought Easton: https://uni-watch.com/2016/11/01/corporate-theater-unfolds-on-nhl-gear/ To me it makes sense. Easton is a bundled entity that has a corporate life of its own. Even if it’s all but dead at present, it could be sold at some point. Advertising it on the biggest stage in the industry would increase its value prior to sale. The NHL doesn’t have a buy-one-get-one-free offer on the value generated by that exposure.
  2. Google’s scraping Pure Hockey, who says 8.0 TF9’s weight surplus over the Mako II is closer to half that: 904g; about 5.7% heavier than 8.0 Mako II at 850g. But 8.0 TF ≠ 8.0 Mako II. The sizing is off by at least 0.5, so a better (still imperfect) comparison would be 7.5 TF, which would likely be several grams lighter (maybe below 900?)—still a bit heavier than Mako II, but not by a lot. TF’s a more robust boot, for better (protection and longevity) and worse (not as impressive at the weigh in). Catalyst differs quite a bit from TF. @psh could chime in because he’s tried everything, but the points I mentioned previously about how Catalyst differs from TF makes me think one segment True’s eyeing with Catalyst is Mako diehards who don’t have a great option on the current market, as well as just direct competition with the light-and-agile segment.
  3. Catalyst is worth a look. It’s out in a month. True boot that’s supposed to rival Hyperlight and JS4 in weight with softer facing, flex tendon guard, and reduced volume toecap. What size Makos do you wear and how light are they, out of curiosity?
  4. I started looking at that too. That could be. But then again, pro options are so vast, so it might have some really particular specs you won't find at retail.
  5. Do you shoot right or left? W01 is a little easier to find on prostockhockey.com in left. A lot of the recent results are "team" sticks though, which makes me think they may be in the 450-475g range. Not sure what your budget, weight preference are. I'm with @Buzz_LightBeer though, can you elaborate on how the puck is jumping over your blade on toe drags?
  6. Wow. I wouldn't want to apply just from looking at how that job posting is formatted. Looking at warrior.com, it's not up on their careers page. I was hoping they would have acquired Alkali. Tron sunk that ship. Meanwhile Justin Hoffman was doing impressive things with their skates, and there were still a few Mission loyalists looking for a new pair of boots along those lines. It'll be interesting to see what their angle might be if/when this comes to fruition. The direction their protective, especially gloves, has been going the last few years, my expectations are on the low end.
  7. MacKinnon's special skates have both 80K and 100K graphics elements to them. They don't actually correspond to a particular CCM model from what I can tell.
  8. The blade paint isn’t quite the same. It’s clear there’s no texture on the shaft either. Bauer’s sloppy flex numbers look out of place on such an iconic and pristine design, as do the blade pattern IDs. It’s not really a Synergy, I know, but this is just a bastardization of such a great stick. It tarnishes the Synergy legacy.
  9. Love the Modano. I have it on an HTX that I hope never breaks. I wish they would reintroduce the bumpy texture and clear coat finish. I would get a 100 Modano then. It would be interesting to see what that price would be with inflation. Synergy was 460g. It was beyond great in its day, but that’s not a competitive stick on today’s market. You have been able to get a stick around that weight and $150 for the last few years anyway. Edit: According to this inflation calculator, $150 in 2000 is roughly $255 in 2022.
  10. Did you look at the gif I made? The sticks lined up (the angles weren't as misaligned as it looked from the static image), there was no glare obscuring the geometry, it's a better Drury to compare with (as I previously mentioned), and the pictures weren't all over the place. You haven't addressed any of the flaws in what you're showing. Adding P29 to the mix does nothing to clarify at all. Look back at the gif I made and tell me what you see.
  11. Let's try with another gif: Does that help? I do use the heel curve capabilities of an X28 when I use one. What I appreciate about a heel curve or a heel and toe curve is the ability to saucer the puck without involving my wrists. The open face is made to elevate the puck as it travels from heel to toe. As always with the X28, the release point for this is earlier than it normally would be, otherwise the puck gets released in the rockered toe section of the blade. The problem then is, instead of the puck tilting upwards for liftoff, it partially loses contact with the blade, so the puck only lifts up on one side and falls on the other: flutter launch. If you release before the toe rocker kicks in, the heel works as any lofted heel curve does.
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