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Nyanad

Learning to ski as an adult

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Hello! I'm going skiing with my friends  in two weeks for the first time. Will i have any advantages as a hockey player? To any of you, who learned skiing as adults too, how long did it take you to learn the hockey stop on skis?

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I've never skied before, but I'd say you will have some advantage by just being at least moderately athletic with decent balance. Beyond that, probably not a ton of crossover there, unless you're talking cross-country skiing which I think would be much more applicable.

My "California goal" is to ski/snowboard and surf on the same day, which should be pretty easy to accomplish. In my case both of them would be beginner lessons since I've never tried either, but that's okay. 

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There isn't a huge amount of difference, edge control is the key and the edges are just a lot wider apart in skis and you have a bit more real estate out the front and behind. I teach learner ice players using the pizza wedge, the same technique I learnt from skiing. Once you have that pizza wedge in place you just lift the inside foot and plant it for a full on stop. Keep your knees bent and try not to let the ski tips cross over. 

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What Vet said.  Think of the Ski as a wider skate runner.  Not sure where you are but in some  ski regions , some of the resorts are offering discounted ski or snowboarding lessons. I would recommend signing up for one of those to familiarize yourself with the gear.  

 

 

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As someone who has done the opposite (skied as a kid, learning to skate as an adult), overall have to agree with the above.  Not alot of difference when it comes to edge control.  You already have that concept down.  Inside edge, outside edge.  Inside edge is almost exclusively what you use until you are parallel skiing.  And even then, your downhill leg, inside edge is doing most of the work. 

Skiing is actually far simpler as far as I can see.  The boots eliminate the ankle, so you are using the larger muscle groups.  Bend your knees, weight over the balls of your feet.  Get up on your toes more to slow down, back on your heels to accelerate.  The snowplow (pizza wedge), will be your friend.  Just like beginning skate technique.  As you get more comfortable, the feet will come together and you'll be parallel skiing.   Hands should be out in front, like a steering wheel.  They are really just there for balance.  Alot of places are teaching skiing without poles these days, as they have a pretty limited role in actually getting you downhill. 

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wherever you're going arrange for at least one day of beginner lessons and don't listen to your friends when they say, "we can show you!" unless your friend is an instructor.

your friends egging you on and getting you to go on a run that is above your level is a good way to get injured.

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Lifetime hockey player that just went skiing for the first time this Winter.

I believe the skating skills transferred over to skiing, especially understanding/trusting your edges.  Not being able to use my ankles was the biggest difference.

I took a morning beginner session with a bunch of little kids learning to ski.  Maybe a little embarrassing, but I found it super helpful to get down the basics.

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Thanks for your replies. Yep i'm definitely getting an instructor. I already experienced how the ''we can show you!'' thing can work a couple years ago.  I'm going to Tatry mountains.

 

krisdrum

I cannot quite understand...  if the boots eliminate the ankle, then how can you bend your knees actually? Sorry i was never in ski boots.

 

IPv6Freely

Cool idea. I think you should add skateboard.

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31 minutes ago, Nyanad said:

krisdrum

 

I cannot quite understand...  if the boots eliminate the ankle, then how can you bend your knees actually? Sorry i was never in ski boots.

The concept is the same, but not as nuanced.  You can't really roll your ankle in/out in a ski boot, they go up to mid-calf, and incredibly stiff/rigid.  If you think some modern skates are like a cast, ski boots will feel like cement casts.  They are angled to get you in the knees bent/weigh over balls stance.  There is some fore/aft play (depending on how tight you get crank them), but really none laterally.  So to get on your edges, it is all about leg angle.  It is really led by the knee.  Now you are certainly doing alot of that in skates as well.  But unlike skates, the ankle is a passive participant.  The skating motion and body position is far more complex and dynamic. 

Edited by krisdrum
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I went skiing for the first time in my early 20's.  I figured I would start slow and figure it out on the bunny slope. It was too flat, and didn't have enough of a decline to get any speed. Ended up rolling around in the snow trying to make that work for about 45 minutes before getting frustrated and just going down the actual mountain.  The edge work is the same as skating, the hip motion and knee bend is the same as well.   The only time I fell that day was on the bunny slope and in line when someone behind be asked what time it was.  Getting a lesson is probably the way to go, but it's also not hard to get the hang of if you have a background in skating.  

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