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RadioGaGa

Job Search question

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Is it bad form to go to a job interview if you really have no intention of taking the job?

I have accepted a job (it's shift/factory work). I start next week. I got a call yesterday from a resume I put into a sales job last month. They want to meet Monday afternoon. It's a commission sales job, but if there is no existing client list to build from, I'm not interested at all.

I haven't been on many interviews, so I want to have as many experiences as I can...so if I'm in the position to be searching again, it's not like this time has been.

** For those who don't know: I spent 15 years in a job I got right off a College Co-Op. So essentially, I'm job searching for the first time in my life right now**

Who knows...this may end up being a worth while opportunity. But it would have to be good...the money in the job I'm taking is decent and guaranteed (as in, not commission based)

Thoughts?

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It never hurts to check out the opportunity. Just don't let the interviewers get wind that you have no intention of taking it, otherwise, you'll just piss them off for wasting their time and you'll leave a bad taste in their mouth.

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Well, I don't want to say "no intention of taking it". Slim, at this point. If they were to blow my socks off with an existing client list that already has income...it could be worth changing my mind on the other place.

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go. and don't feel bad at all. You know how many times companies call in prospective applicants for jobs, but already know who it is they are going to hire? it has happened to me at least twice. A lot of companies will have minimums to fulfill interview wise, why not use the same philosophy? besides, it not only benefits you, it can benefit the interviewer as well, the more interviews they have, the better they are as well, at least in theory! Like chippa said, dont let them know you are not likely to take it, just conduct the interview like you would any other for a job you want. If you decide you dont for sure want it, write up a nice thank you interview letter, and notify them that you have selected another opportunity in that letter.

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Always go. Never hurts to talk and perhaps make a new contact.

You never know when you might need to ring them up... Maybe the job you accepted turns out to be crap? Always have options!

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Stewie really nailed it. If, after the interview (or, even under the right circumstances, right at the end), it's really clear that you wouldn't accept an offer, it's best to let them know as soon as possible, but don't deny yourself an opportunity, no matter how slim you think your chances of accepting are. I think the more pressing ethical concern would be if you were to accept this job and have to back out of the job you're already about to start. Even then, you've got to do what's best for you, but ideally find a way that doesn't burn any bridges.

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Exactly. It's possible the ad or initial contact didn't fully convey the scope of the position, and maybe the interview will pique your curiosity enough to be willing to pursue it further.

At the very least, you'll gain practice at answering those stupid questions about, "What would you say is one of your greatest weaknesses......."

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If anything the interview practice and gaining a potential new contact alone are worth it. If this role isn't for you but they like you, they might know someone/something that could be a better fit.

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I think some people are overestimating the possibility of developing a new contact out of the interview. Interviewers see several candidates for a given opening and it is extremely rare that they develop any kind of lasting connection with an interviewee who doesn't get offered or take the job.

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I think some people are overestimating the possibility of developing a new contact out of the interview. Interviewers see several candidates for a given opening and it is extremely rare that they develop any kind of lasting connection with an interviewee who doesn't get offered or take the job.

this hasnt been my experience. I have twice turned down jobs only for them to contact me later and see what my employment status currently is/how my accepted job was going. If you make enough of an impression, people remember you.

The big takeaway is dont burn any bridges. I had a job where i wasnt very happy, and one of my previous employers contacted me for my old job back. i accepted, but then the company i was with offered me a big pay raise and more hours (30 to 40). I then, in retrospect stupidly, backed out of going to my old job 4 days before start, for the money and it burned that bridge. its the biggest career mistake i made to date, but i ended up being ok.

Make an honest decision early and let the rejected employer know. dont burn any bridges, and keep your options open.

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I've never understood why companies counter-offer people who give their notice. All they are doing is delaying the inevitable. The person is still going to leave except now you've given them a better jumping off point for salary and possibly a year of a better title on their resume.

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well in full disclosure, i had yet to give my notice at the point. Someone was leaving and they offered me his spot full time in the lab, instead of part time lab/part time prep. told them i would take it, then battled it in my head for a week. It literally occured when i was about to give notice too, just weird timing, and bad decision making on my part. but back to the original thread =)

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Thanks guys...lots of good insight here. As I said, the job I have accepted is factory/assembly line work. This would be a little more in the line of work I'm familiar with (Advertising/Marketing)...but commission and few guarantees is more than a little frightening when a decent hourly wage and 40+ hours a week are staring you in the face.

And...if only to further complicate the issue...I just got a text from a friend who knows of a position at a local agency that they are trying to fill. Haven't posted anything yet, but I have some dealings with them from radio and have always worked well with the President of the company. Might also be worth following up on.

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I'll go in the opposite direction, if you have zero intrest in the position, don't go. Don't waste their time and resources looking at a canidate who has no interest. Yeah it's a connection, but that connection may not be all that valuable when all is said and done.

If you are interested, by all means go, go and hear what they have to offer. If you aren't, let them focus on other canidates.

I would tend to lean towards the steady paycheck. That doesn't mean you have to stop looking.


I've never understood why companies counter-offer people who give their notice. All they are doing is delaying the inevitable. The person is still going to leave except now you've given them a better jumping off point for salary and possibly a year of a better title on their resume.

Been down this road twice in the past two years. Gave my notice, they threw money at me (I stayed), gave my notice again 10 months later and tried to throw money at it again (didn't work), money they really didn't have. I believe, they don't feel like anything is wrong with the company and your position and you are only leaving because of money.

You're right though, it's delaying the inevitble....maybe they actuall know that and are trying to buy themselves time. I'd love to know if anyone ever stayed and the added money fixed everything.

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UPDATE: Went to the interview. It was very casual and informal. Nice people. Small agency, but seemed for active and busy.

I did disclose the factory job to them...they were talking about a potential January start, to get through their Christmas rush without having to worry about trying to train a new person at the same time...so I figured there was no harm.

They said they would have an offer for a starting salary/commission structure to me mid week. I sent a follow up email the next day, thanking them for the interview and said I was looking forward to learning more about their offer/opportunity. I did not get a reply, and that offer never came.

Maybe disclosing the other job was a bad idea...but I suggested it was more of a "survival job" while I continue looking for a media/marketing position because that is my background and greatest interest. At the interview, they seemed totally ok with that. He even said, "Go off to that job..make some money for a month or 2 and we can get going in January"

I guess they either changed their mind about my fit for them...or just found a more suitable candidate. Either way, I expected to hear from them.

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Either way, I expected to hear from them.

The lack of communication from a lot of the companies that I have applied to or interviewed with is shocking. One company that I interviewed with got pretty nasty when I dared to ask questions of them after they made an offer.

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The lack of communication from a lot of the companies that I have applied to or interviewed with is shocking. One company that I interviewed with got pretty nasty when I dared to ask questions of them after they made an offer.

At least you found out what they were like before working there.

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