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Diablo34

Blocking shots and chirping

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Hello again everyone I have another question that (hopefully) I won't get roasted for asking this time hahaha. Thank you to everyone who has given me helpful feedback and grown my knowledge on how not to be known as a  douche bag by being an over agredsive "meat head" 

I was wondering what everyone things of chirping at the low lever "beer league" level. I know it's a pretty big thing in the NHL but like I've been told A LOT that I shouldn't be basing my game on what I see on TV. So I a little chirping acceptable? As long as it doesn't go to far? And second in your experiences do most people in these low levels attempt to lay out and block shots with their body?  I'm just very competitive and although it is just beer league I don't have a problem laying out if it helps my team. Or would this behavior get me marked as someone who tries to hard? And yes I had one of the coaches at the rink teach me the proper technique on how to lay out.

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For me, there's different types of chirping. There's the friendly kind where both teams can get a good laugh out of it. There's no animosity to it. It's just something happens and someone just needs to make a crack, whether it's an own goal or someone tripping over the blue line. Then there's the more nasty kind where someone is trying to get under another person's skin. It's rare in the circles I play, but It happens from time to time, but to me, you have to be pretty insecure to react to much to it. My usual reply is "School's out, so grow up." 

Because honestly, that's schoolyard stuff. Telling me I suck or calling me a name is like telling me the sky is blue and calling me Fred. My name's not Fred, so I'm not answering to it.

As for trying too hard and laying out. To me, that depends on the type of game. If it's just pick up, probably not the best idea. In a league game, as long as you're not slashing fingers, elbowing people, or sliding like a rocket into someone's knees, I don't think anyone really cares one way or another. It's competition, so I think it's implied that that you try your best, as long as it doesn't result in someone getting hurt, yourself included.

The more you play, the better feel you'll get for when to go 110% and when to just go 90%

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Howdy,

Most chirping I hear is 'friendly' and is done between people that know each other.  "Serious" chirping, or talking a bunch of shit to someone you don't know isn't typically very well received, particularly in the beginner levels where pretty much everyone out there sucks and knows that they suck.  Making fun of someone for fucking up when you've just fucked up constantly every shift you've been out there just makes you seem like an ass and will likely just induce laughter at you acting the fool.

As for blocking shots... I think it depends more on you than anything.  Where I've played if you make an effort to block a shot with your body nobody will care or think you're trying too hard.  Equally they aren't going to feel bad if you catch the puck between your pads.  The "trying too hard" stuff is much more likely to come if you are out of control in terms of your skating / stick / whatever and are bouncing off people / slashing them / etc.

Honestly... Just go play for a while.  Quit overthinking it.  You'll catch on pretty fast as to what's normal and what isn't and in the interim period, when in doubt shut the fuck up and play the game according to the rules (the actual ones.  :-)

Mark

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I havent really had much chirping done on ice as compared to when I played inline. Having said that though, the 'chirping' I heard (most against me) when I played inline was borderline racist comments, which didnt affect me except for once... I spent the next two shifts of that game trying to line the chirper up after that, and was rightly told to sit the next shift and get my head back in the game. Best response I gave that guy was just pointing to the scoreboard, when we were already 7-0 up.

I've been playing ice for the last 18 months or so, and through that time have gotten to know some of the guys from the other teams pretty well. During the game its all business, but its all hand shakes, pats on the back and laughs after the game. 

 

As for blocking shots, I agree with those above ... its all depends on you. I dont think any teams force you to block a shot. Most if not all the players will have to be at school, work etc the next day, so its about how you want to play the game. For me, shot blocking is a big part of my game, and its how I've always played. I know my goalies appreciate it, and they tell me not to change how I play. I treat a successful blocked shot like an assist

Edited by fatwabbit
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What a shock. The guy whose previous questions were all about checking in no-check hockey and "intimidating" or "getting in the head" of other players and fighting before he's even played a single game of hockey now wants to know about "chirping" in beginner-level beer league. Hey, I know this probably sounds crazy to you, but how about just focusing on your basic skills like skating, stickhandling, passing, and shooting and just forgetting all that other bullshit? You're like the guy brand new to bodybuilding on a BB forum asking about steroid cycles and "stacks" after all of 6 weeks of gym training. No matter how many lifelong bodybuilders tell him to forget about drugs for now and try just training for a few years you know he'll be sticking himself with needles within weeks. IMO, there's 0.0 chance this guy doesn't cheap-shot somebody into the boards and/or provoke a fight in his very first game and get tossed from the league before he ever completes one pass..

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8 minutes ago, YesLanges said:

What a shock. The guy whose previous questions were all about checking in no-check hockey and "intimidating" or "getting in the head" of other players and fighting before he's even played a single game of hockey now wants to know about "chirping" in beginner-level beer league. Hey, I know this probably sounds crazy to you, but how about just focusing on your basic skills like skating, stickhandling, passing, and shooting and just forgetting all that other bullshit? You're like the guy brand new to bodybuilding on a BB forum asking about steroid cycles and "stacks" after all of 6 weeks of gym training. No matter how many lifelong bodybuilders tell him to forget about drugs for now and try just training for a few years you know he'll be sticking himself with needles within weeks. IMO, there's 0.0 chance this guy doesn't cheap-shot somebody into the boards and/or provoke a fight in his very first game and get tossed from the league before he ever completes one pass..

You have zero understanding of any of the questions I am asking. Is this not a forum? And the goal of a forum is for people to ask questions and receive advice. I've been a hockey fan for 15 years and have had season tickets for 9. I know how the game works and my main preseason focuses are skating, stickhandling, passing stick handling and shooting. I have a deep respect for the sport but coming from a division 1 college football program it's vitnif a learning curve as far as the non-checking rules go. Igor someone who doesn't know me you seem to have a pretty interesting idea of my character stored in your mind. I am a good person I'm just quickly trying to get the rules of contact, chirping and learn what is not acceptable. As a mature adult and member of this great forum you should be leading newer guys like me with comstructive  criticism... not talking shit on my abilities. You need to learn there is a HUGE difference between asking a question about angry about a grey area  topic and just going ahead and doing it. So maybe next time a newbie comes through with a questions you calmly explain why that's not acceptable. I'm glad I learned these lessons online as opposed to causing problems I'm a game.

amd as for your 100% chance of my getting thrown out during my first game I'll take a picture of the team after we win to prove your immature ass wrong. Grow up

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Chirping in mens league to get under the skin of someone is as dumb as trying to fight someone in mens league.  I have made a wise crack to ease the tension or if I am playing against someone I know on the other team.

Blocking shots is okay in my opinion however there is an art form to it, and 99% of the time if you drop and try and slide across the ice the only thing you're going to accomplish is taking yourself out of position.  

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1. Anyone chirping in men's league presumably has a serious void or inadequacy in another part of their life that they are trying to address. At that point we're all playing for fun, not a paycheck.

2. Don't block shots until your technique for doing so is near perfect. Otherwise you're asking for time on IR. 

Edited by Cavs019
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I just can’t figure out why these questions are being asked in the first place. You wouldn’t be asking them if the idea of doing them hadn’t already gone through your mind. 

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I think chirping is acceptable as long as you are chirping your buddies. 

As far as blocking shots go, have at it but I would focus more on positional play. This will help you read plays and learn to do the right things to prevent goals in your own zone. Try the body on body and stick on stick method, the goal is not to check the puck carrier just get in their way to block lanes. 

Here are some links to some good training youtubers that can help you get a better understanding of what you need to do.

 

 

Focus on position and skating, all the other stuff doesn't matter starting out. Remember, if you play humble you will improve at a faster rate.

Edited by adams2001
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It's recreational hockey. Try to play for fun and with sportsmanship. I wouldn't chirp anyone, but a friend in a joking manner or someone that's really being an ass. If they're just playing the game then chirping is silly at the adult rec level.

As for shot blocking, you can get in the lanes and get your body square to the puck while standing so that it will hopefully deflect off your shin pads, but I wouldn't recommend diving and sliding to block shots. This increases the chances of you getting hurt, especially as a beginner. Also, if you're sliding and diving everywhere there's more of a chance you'll take out someone's legs and cause them to get hurt.

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14 minutes ago, althoma1 said:

It's recreational hockey. Try to play for fun and with sportsmanship. I wouldn't chirp anyone, but a friend in a joking manner or someone that's really being an ass. If they're just playing the game then chirping is silly at the adult rec level.

As for shot blocking, you can get in the lanes and get your body square to the puck while standing so that it will hopefully deflect off your shin pads, but I wouldn't recommend diving and sliding to block shots. This increases the chances of you getting hurt, especially as a beginner. Also, if you're sliding and diving everywhere there's more of a chance you'll take out someone's legs and cause them to get hurt.

And if you're going to block a shot standing up: if you're not within a few feet of the guy...  as a goalie I beg of you, get the hell out of the way! :)

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The other side of that is if you have a goalie that can't stop a beach ball then you try to block everything you can. That said, blocking shots in a low level league is dangerous business since guys don't have good control of their shots and you could just as easily take a shot off the throat as the shin pads. As far as chirping, that is reserved for good natured stuff between guys that know each other. Doing it to rile somebody up is bush.

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I have to agree with what has been said, maybe it is beating a dead horse at this point.. 

My experience with Rookie League is that the better players on both teams are trying to help the players that are just learning.  Talking with them about position, not just taking the puck from them, even when they could, giving them some experience skating with the puck etc., expressing encouraging words etc.  Though everyone wants to win, “almost everyone” knows that it’s just rookie league hockey.  There are no D4BL scouts in the stands looking for someone to bring up.

Take this for what it’s worth - I don’t care how long you’ve loved the game or had season tickets somewhere, you’re asking the wrong questions.  The stuff you are asking about and appear to want to do on the ice(hitting, chirping), are the exact things that make guys question coming back to the rink.  Beer League, ESPECIALLY AT THE LOWER LEVELS, is just a bunch of players that want to get out & skate a little bit, get some exercise, compete(hoping for evenly matched games, which are more fun, win or lose) & hang with the team in the locker room over a few beers.  What Beer League is not – Youtube Highlight clips of hits and chirping.  It appears, I could be 100% off, you have a very skewed view of what beer league hockey is about.

(guess there is the chance that you're just trolling the board)

Edited by EJB
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1 hour ago, chippa13 said:

The other side of that is if you have a goalie that can't stop a beach ball then you try to block everything you can. 

Maybe that's why they keep doing it :)

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1 hour ago, EJB said:

I have to agree with what has been said, maybe it is beating a dead horse at this point.. 

My experience with Rookie League is that the better players on both teams are trying to help the players that are just learning.  Talking with them about position, not just taking the puck from them, even when they could, giving them some experience skating with the puck etc., expressing encouraging words etc.  Though everyone wants to win, “almost everyone” knows that it’s just rookie league hockey.  There are no D4BL scouts in the stands looking for someone to bring up.

Beer League, ESPECIALLY AT THE LOWER LEVELS, is just a bunch of players that want to get out & skate a little bit, get some exercise, compete(hoping for evenly matched games, which are more fun, win or lose) & hang with the team in the locker room over a few beers. 

I wish the rookie league here was like that, but the director has allowed it to become a shit show. The guys who shouldn't be in the league will take advantage of everyone and are more than happy to be a rookie league all-star. 

Your last paragraph quoted above is exactly why I joined rookie league. I may have been at the upper end of that level (though I play D5 as a goalie and I don't think I could hang in that division as a skater) but I only joined because I missed skating out and figured it would be great to get out and have a skate in a division where nobody cares. Then the "incident" happened (you've all seen me talk about it before) and I have been on player skates ONCE since then, at Winterfest. If they ever weed out the idiots I'd love to go back. Until then, hard pass. 

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38 minutes ago, IPv6Freely said:

Maybe that's why they keep doing it :)

Hey, if more shots go in than get stopped when I'm letting you see them then I have no choice but to stop worrying about defending and positioning to clear rebounds and start getting in the way of everything I can. We had one goalie where I had more saves during games than he did.

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21 minutes ago, chippa13 said:

Hey, if more shots go in than get stopped when I'm letting you see them then I have no choice but to stop worrying about defending and positioning to clear rebounds and start getting in the way of everything I can. We had one goalie where I had more saves during games than he did.

People always ask me if I got new pads because they're so clean... 

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1 minute ago, chippa13 said:

And you don't catch the sarcasm?

Of course I do..? You're not the only one with the exceptional ability to be clever. 

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Friendly chirping or mild chirping is okay. Hard chirping is pretty stupid, especially in a low level. If you are going to chirp you need to be able to back it up with play, which usually can't be done at that level.

Laying out to block a shot in beer league is a good way to get hurt. The only time I've ever laid out was for a championship game. Most newbies don't know how to lay out and will just make a mess of it. The other thing is if you are sliding around on the ice and not on your skates you are completely out of the play and doing no good.  

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3 hours ago, EJB said:

I have to agree with what has been said, maybe it is beating a dead horse at this point.. 

Take this for what it’s worth - I don’t care how long you’ve loved the game or had season tickets somewhere, you’re asking the wrong questions.  The stuff you are asking about and appear to want to do on the ice(hitting, chirping), are the exact things that make guys question coming back to the rink.  What Beer League is not – Youtube Highlight clips of hits and chirping.  It appears, I could be 100% off, you have a very skewed view of what beer league hockey is about.

Exactly.

11 hours ago, Diablo34 said:

You have zero understanding of any of the questions I am asking. Is this not a forum? And the goal of a forum is for people to ask questions and receive advice. I've been a hockey fan for 15 years and have had season tickets for 9. I know how the game works and my main preseason focuses are skating, stickhandling, passing stick handling and shooting. I have a deep respect for the sport but coming from a division 1 college football program it's vitnif a learning curve as far as the non-checking rules go. Igor someone who doesn't know me you seem to have a pretty interesting idea of my character stored in your mind. I am a good person I'm just quickly trying to get the rules of contact, chirping and learn what is not acceptable. As a mature adult and member of this great forum you should be leading newer guys like me with comstructive  criticism... not talking shit on my abilities. You need to learn there is a HUGE difference between asking a question about angry about a grey area  topic and just going ahead and doing it. So maybe next time a newbie comes through with a questions you calmly explain why that's not acceptable. I'm glad I learned these lessons online as opposed to causing problems I'm a game.

amd as for your 100% chance of my getting thrown out during my first game I'll take a picture of the team after we win to prove your immature ass wrong. Grow up

Give me a break. Your questions pretty much indicate exactly where your head is at and why you're interested in getting on the ice. Your question about "hitting" and "getting into the heads" of opponents were all fully answered by the very first responses to your very first post by dozens of experienced players, but you're still asking (essentially) the same questions. Earlier in this thread, someone explained to you that what's appropriate in adult recreational hockey is pretty much the same that's appropriate in flag football and you thanked them for the analogy and said that you understood.

Most "newbies" come here asking about how to improve their basic skills, like skating, stopping, positioning, holding onto the puck, and shooting. You seem to have no interest whatsoever in any of that stuff, because all you ask about is all the most obnoxious shit that only the standout assholes do in recreational hockey; and despite your continual thanking people for their input, you just find other ways of asking the same (or nearly the same) questions. As EJB pointed out above, your questions all seem to reveal what your real motivation is and what you really want to do on the ice. If you're really interested in learning, you've already received enough input to know the answers to these ridiculous questions.

Allow me to break it down for you once more so you don't need to waste your time (and anybody else's) asking about the same stupid shit again and again:

1. Don't be an asshole. In recreational hockey, initiating body contact and interacting in any aggressive way with your opponents (including verbally) makes you an asshole. "Good people" are defined by how they act, not what they and their families think of themselves. If you're chomping at the bit to hit people and "chirp" them before you've ever played a game, you might not be as good a person as you imagine. Normally, that "I'm a good person" shit is what you hear from the guys in handcuffs after they just got done kicking the shit out of someone in a bar for looking at them wrong. Pretty much a red flag to hear that here and it only reinforces my stated expectations for you as a hockey player.

2. Avoid body contact as much as possible. Never initiate contact for any reason. If you sense an inevitable collision with another player, try to absorb the blow as much as possible instead of tensing up and leaning into the other guy. Being a bigger guy, you don't have to worry about the other guy not doing the right thing in that respect. Don't be the asshole who uses an accidental collision as an excuse to skate through the other guy and flatten him.

3. STFU on the ice. Don't talk to your opponents. Don't stare anybody down for brushing against you or a teammate. Don't envision yourself as some "enforcer" or jump at the chance to take on the role of "protector" of your smaller teammates. Nobody is looking to mess with them and nobody needs your scary protection abilities in adult beginner recreational hockey. Focus exclusively on improving your skills and making good decisions when you get the puck.

So, that should be it for your questions about "hitting" and "chirping" and "protecting" your teammates. I'm just summarizing what 50 other people have been trying to tell you since your first post here.

Now, if you're really interested in actually learning to play the game of hockey, ask all the questions you want about basic skills and positioning and anything else that doesn't have to do with every possible way you can be the biggest asshole on the ice.

 

 

 

 

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