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beardacus

Are the newer Ribcore skates the highest volume CCM skate?

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Can anyone confirm that the Ribcore skate is the highest volume CCM skate? I am reading mixed things online. Some places compare them to Vapor, a few have compared them to Nexus. I want to switch my son over to CCMs but when we were at a proshop last year they gave him the super tacks to try on for a high volume foot and they were a bit tight for him. The guy didn't even offer us Ribcores to try on as a possibility. 

Would they be comparable to a Nexus skate in fit?

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Tacks have the most volume of any CCM skate.  I would suggest trying the 9090 or 9080, as in my personal opinion they have a little more volume than the one piece Super Tacks.

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When it comes to depth(volume), I'd put the Ribcor somewhere between the vapor and supreme.

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Take it for it's worth, but I know of several skaters that scan for Vapor and they also scan for RibCor using the CCM scanner.

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I have never tried on Ribcor but I was considering them as a next skate, so I am familiar with the confusion. It is my understanding that although they are low volume, they are the most accommodating/ pliable to baking. So, it is a bit confusing, take it for what it's worth. 

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They are pliable when baked but if your volume issue is that your foot is high and coming out the top of the skate, baking wont help.  They are a low-volume skate from an instep-height perspective.

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From what I recall CCM changed the sizing on EE Ribcors to accommodate bigger feet and it isn't a direct comparison to their D size. Never tried it on though myself so I can't comment on that.

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20 hours ago, beardacus said:

Can anyone confirm that the Ribcore skate is the highest volume CCM skate? I am reading mixed things online. Some places compare them to Vapor, a few have compared them to Nexus. I want to switch my son over to CCMs but when we were at a proshop last year they gave him the super tacks to try on for a high volume foot and they were a bit tight for him. The guy didn't even offer us Ribcores to try on as a possibility. 

Would they be comparable to a Nexus skate in fit?

 

1 hour ago, Hills said:

From what I recall CCM changed the sizing on EE Ribcors to accommodate bigger feet and it isn't a direct comparison to their D size. Never tried it on though myself so I can't comment on that.

As of 2019, Ribcor EE is CCM's widest, deepest out of the box skate. Conversely, Ribcor D is CCM's narrowest out of the box skate. The reasoning is that Ribcor construction is uniquely suited to molding and will serve a customer on the narrow (with D) and wide (with EE) part of the spectrum equally well. The main difference (and this is true for all CCM skates) is that the quarter material is super reactive to heat. So while the Rib EE may seem similar out of the box in size to a competing product, the amount that it will change during a baking/molding process is significantly greater and can fit a lot more feet as a result. Rib EE ends up being CCM's largest and blankest canvas for a foot to fit into and that's what makes it so useful for those with significantly different than stock sized/shaped feet.

Volume is a little challenging regarding Ribcor because of these same molding properties; the amount of wrap is going to depend on a lot of factors including the unique geometry of each foot and the only way to know for sure is to heat one up and tie it. CCM skates can be rebaked multiple times so no need to worry if it requires a couple molds, just keep 24 hours between heatings.

Finally, all CCM skates come with a 90 day satisfaction guarantee so if it ends up not working out, just return the skates and get something different. 

As a PS: We've done hundreds of retail fittings since the intro of the new Rib EE and 1 important learning has been that if it seems like nothing will fit well, Ribcor will probably end up working... Oftentimes we'll get called by dealers or equipment managers to work out an especially difficult fitting scenario and more often than not, the result is a Ribcor construction. 

Good luck with your skate search!

 

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DGqN-l8UIAACX5O.jpg

 

ccmframechart.jpg

 

ccm-skate-fitguide-3.jpg

 

ccm-skate-fitguide-4.jpg

 

ccm-skate-fitguide.jpg

 

Not sure if these diagram/charts help you or not.

I wear Jetspeed (previously known as RBZ). I have a wide foot. I wear 5.5 EE (before CCM switch sizing) in CCMJetspeed and 6.0 D in Bauer Supreme. I tried 5.5 D in Ribcore... that was tight and my feet started tingling from lack of blood supply.

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The last 3 pictures don't apply anymore Jetspeed is now smaller than the Tacks line all around.

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I'll have to confirm that the CCM skates are very very mouldable. In terms of pliability pretty much the same as true, and takes less heat / time when using a heat gun. The Bauer's still are no where near thermaformability vs the two mentioned. 

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On 5/4/2020 at 11:38 AM, CCMHockey said:

 

As of 2019, Ribcor EE is CCM's widest, deepest out of the box skate. Conversely, Ribcor D is CCM's narrowest out of the box skate. The reasoning is that Ribcor construction is uniquely suited to molding and will serve a customer on the narrow (with D) and wide (with EE) part of the spectrum equally well. The main difference (and this is true for all CCM skates) is that the quarter material is super reactive to heat. So while the Rib EE may seem similar out of the box in size to a competing product, the amount that it will change during a baking/molding process is significantly greater and can fit a lot more feet as a result. Rib EE ends up being CCM's largest and blankest canvas for a foot to fit into and that's what makes it so useful for those with significantly different than stock sized/shaped feet.

Volume is a little challenging regarding Ribcor because of these same molding properties; the amount of wrap is going to depend on a lot of factors including the unique geometry of each foot and the only way to know for sure is to heat one up and tie it. CCM skates can be rebaked multiple times so no need to worry if it requires a couple molds, just keep 24 hours between heatings.

Finally, all CCM skates come with a 90 day satisfaction guarantee so if it ends up not working out, just return the skates and get something different. 

As a PS: We've done hundreds of retail fittings since the intro of the new Rib EE and 1 important learning has been that if it seems like nothing will fit well, Ribcor will probably end up working... Oftentimes we'll get called by dealers or equipment managers to work out an especially difficult fitting scenario and more often than not, the result is a Ribcor construction. 

Good luck with your skate search!

 

This is interesting. Can you elaborate a bit more on how heat moulding would impact the fit for the current Jetspeed skates (the one piece 490 and FT2)?

I actually own the 490 and they fit super tight before baking. However, after heat moulding and skating in them for a bit, they loosened up more than I would have liked.

Did I lace them too tight when baking? Is there a recommended CCM instruction for how to tie skates when baking the new one piece skates?

FYI I cranked on my laces as tight as I could because LHS have always said that this the best way for the boot to mould to your feet, but now I think the internal cushioning may have flattened out in the process...

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Going to take a stab at some items that came up over the past couple of posts. Thanks everyone for reaching out!

On 5/4/2020 at 11:05 AM, beardacus said:

Thanks for the reply CCM. Is the Ribcore EE wider or comparable to Nexus in volume? 

Forefoot is very comparable. Heel start a little more snug (but still very much a "B" heel) and can move out to compare with the nexus heel if necessary.

On 5/4/2020 at 5:48 PM, markush said:

How does volume compare with new AS3 Pro in EE ?

Rib EE has a higher instep measurement than AS3 Pro EE, so more volume and wrap🙂 

On 5/5/2020 at 8:51 PM, Hills said:

The last 3 pictures don't apply anymore Jetspeed is now smaller than the Tacks line all around.

Very good call out here. I'm going to attempt to link some photos clarifying the current fit lineup:

Vz4eJc0.png

HisdAtD.png

 

Keep in mind that this 2nd image does not include the updated Super Tacks EE. Just imagine a little bit bigger yellow box 🙂 

 

On 5/8/2020 at 11:26 PM, BlueNux said:

This is interesting. Can you elaborate a bit more on how heat moulding would impact the fit for the current Jetspeed skates (the one piece 490 and FT2)?

I actually own the 490 and they fit super tight before baking. However, after heat moulding and skating in them for a bit, they loosened up more than I would have liked.

Did I lace them too tight when baking? Is there a recommended CCM instruction for how to tie skates when baking the new one piece skates?

FYI I cranked on my laces as tight as I could because LHS have always said that this the best way for the boot to mould to your feet, but now I think the internal cushioning may have flattened out in the process...

  1. Same idea on Jetspeed. RFM composite is extremely thermoformable and especially so in a one-piece boot as the bottom of the skate is also RFM and lacks the glue and nails that can impact the bottom and immediate sides of a two piece skate from moving as much.
  2. Not sure what happened during your bake but regardless, the next step is to remold them (2 mins in a hot skate oven, no more) and tie them about how you would when playing. It's not necessary to tie them extremely tightly or really crank down on the eyelet row. Be sure to remain sitting until the skates are cool to the touch and don't get up and move around. This should take awhile, maybe 15-20 mins. Take care when molding to lace the skates back up after you've taken them off and leave a full 24hr (at room temp, but colder is better) before unlacing and skating. Good luck!
  3. Not sure if this applies to you, but when taking them off after normal use, loosen the laces down several eyelets before taking them off. It should be extremely easy to slide off and not require much leverage or effort. The skate goes under a lot of stress when being tied up and especially when being removed so taking an extra 10 seconds to really unlace them can help preserve the molded fit.
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This is super helpful! Thank you. Great reason why forums like this are much more useful than other social media sites.

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This is super helpful.  Thanks for sharing the inside scoop. 

Curious what you'd suggest for someone with a narrow heel and wide forefoot?  Ribcor D to get the narrowest heel and let the boot mold in the forefoot to get the width?  Or maybe a Jetspeed EE?  Maybe in a 1-piece boot to take advantage of the more moldable heel? 

I've had decent success in the Vapor line in a EE width.  Had to punch out a few spots on the sides of my foot, but heel lock was pretty good.  In Graf 535 Wide right now, but miss the stiffness of a modern boot.  I'm not sure I want to spend the time building up all those tiny muscles to get the stability and performance I got in the Vapors.  There is appeal to something a bit more point and shoot.   

Edited by krisdrum

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47 minutes ago, krisdrum said:

This is super helpful.  Thanks for sharing the inside scoop. 

Curious what you'd suggest for someone with a narrow heel and wide forefoot?  Ribcor D to get the narrowest heel and let the boot mold in the forefoot to get the width?  Or maybe a Jetspeed EE?  Maybe in a 1-piece boot to take advantage of the more moldable heel? 

I've had decent success in the Vapor line in a EE width.  Had to punch out a few spots on the sides of my foot, but heel lock was pretty good.  In Graf 535 Wide right now, but miss the stiffness of a modern boot.  I'm not sure I want to spend the time building up all those tiny muscles to get the stability and performance I got in the Vapors.  There is appeal to something a bit more point and shoot.   

You are on the right track with both your initial thoughts but I would try Jetspeed EE for you, specifically the FT2 or 490 in EE. They have an updated heel shape vs FT1 that should provide exactly what you are looking for: Tight heel, slightly more generous forefoot with a modern, stiff construction.

Good luck in your search 🙂

 

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18 minutes ago, CCMHockey said:

You are on the right track with both your initial thoughts but I would try Jetspeed EE for you, specifically the FT2 or 490 in EE. They have an updated heel shape vs FT1 that should provide exactly what you are looking for: Tight heel, slightly more generous forefoot with a modern, stiff construction.

Good luck in your search 🙂

 

Slightly related question... is the 490 the same stiffness as the FT1 or closer to the FT2. Did you make the FT2 a stiffer skate than the FT1?

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On 5/11/2020 at 1:11 PM, CCMHockey said:

 

Vz4eJc0.png

HisdAtD.png

 

 

Its crazy how wide of a range Ribcore can fit. Narrow AND wide feet. Almost doesn't make sense how it can be so formable and still stay stiff.

Since my son has wide feet what would you recommend for him to do? CCM has the 30 day return deal so I am thinking get him heat molded in Ribcore 80k skates and let him skate a couple sessions before he makes up his mind. If they are still too tight and uncomfortable then I guess return them for EE RIbcores. I just dont want him to go directly to an EE and then the skates get too sloppy on him after prolonged skating. Do you think this is a good way to try it? For what its worth Supertacks out of the box are a little bit too narrow for him in the forefoot.

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On 5/17/2020 at 2:03 PM, beardacus said:

Its crazy how wide of a range Ribcore can fit. Narrow AND wide feet. Almost doesn't make sense how it can be so formable and still stay stiff.

Since my son has wide feet what would you recommend for him to do? CCM has the 30 day return deal so I am thinking get him heat molded in Ribcore 80k skates and let him skate a couple sessions before he makes up his mind. If they are still too tight and uncomfortable then I guess return them for EE RIbcores. I just dont want him to go directly to an EE and then the skates get too sloppy on him after prolonged skating. Do you think this is a good way to try it? For what its worth Supertacks out of the box are a little bit too narrow for him in the forefoot.

CCM actually has a 90 day satisfaction guarantee on the 80K. If he is using Nexus skates currently then you could try the Ribcor skates or maybe wait for the stores Bauer booking orders to arrive since they will offer 3 FIT families for each model of skate. FIT3, which is most similar to a Nexus, might be a good option for him. The downside would be him having to wait until July/August for new skates. 

Also, if he has difficult feet to fit, why not just go custom? You don't seem overly concerned about the cost if you are looking at top of the line skates. May as well pay a little more and get the best fit possible. 

 

CCM guarantees you'll love these skates or your money back! Buy a pair of qualifying CCM ice skates, sharpen them the way you like and go play! If you are not completely satisfied with the skates, you can return them within 90 days from the date of purchase for a full refund. 

Applies to: 

CCM JetSpeed Skates
(FT2, FT490, FT480, FT1, FT390, FT380, FT370, FT360, FT350, FT340)

CCM RibCor Skates
(80K, 78K, 76K, 74K, 70K, 68K, 66K, 64K)

CCM Tacks Skates

(AS1, 9090, 9080, 9070, 9060, 9050, 9040)

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Answering some more thread q's below:

On 5/11/2020 at 4:34 PM, Hills said:

Slightly related question... is the 490 the same stiffness as the FT1 or closer to the FT2. Did you make the FT2 a stiffer skate than the FT1?

490 is less stiff than FT1. FT2 and FT1 are similarly stiff and 490 less so. 

On 5/17/2020 at 4:03 PM, beardacus said:

Its crazy how wide of a range Ribcore can fit. Narrow AND wide feet. Almost doesn't make sense how it can be so formable and still stay stiff.

Since my son has wide feet what would you recommend for him to do? CCM has the 30 day return deal so I am thinking get him heat molded in Ribcore 80k skates and let him skate a couple sessions before he makes up his mind. If they are still too tight and uncomfortable then I guess return them for EE RIbcores. I just dont want him to go directly to an EE and then the skates get too sloppy on him after prolonged skating. Do you think this is a good way to try it? For what its worth Supertacks out of the box are a little bit too narrow for him in the forefoot.

I think you are on the right track, especially if you don't have both skates to try on before purchasing. 80k D fits a lot of feet really well and EE are WAY bigger. 1 thing to consider given your last sentence is that EE for 2019/2020 include a larger toe box so if you could also try the Super Tacks AS3 line in EE, you may hit the jackpot. Good luck with your search! 

Edited by CCMHockey

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On 5/19/2020 at 10:50 AM, CCMHockey said:

Answering some more thread q's below:

490 is less stiff than FT1. FT2 and FT1 are similarly stiff and 490 less so. 

I think you are on the right track, especially if you don't have both skates to try on before purchasing. 80k D fits a lot of feet really well and EE are WAY bigger. 1 thing to consider given your last sentence is that EE for 2019/2020 include a larger toe box so if you could also try the Super Tacks AS3 line in EE, you may hit the jackpot. Good luck with your search! 

Piggybacking on this thread.

@CCMHockey, can you comment on the width of a 70K D/EE vs 9090 Tacks D, specifically the spot right at the edge of the toe box?

I tried the 70K in a D width and it fit great with the exception of that spot, which was a tiny bit narrow. A single bake didn't resolve it, but I did not try any punching, etc.

The 9090 in a D width is pretty good for me in that spot, but I have other minor issues with the rest of the fit.  I also much prefer the construction of the 70K.

Any thoughts?

Thanks.

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On 5/23/2020 at 3:59 PM, boo10 said:

Piggybacking on this thread.

@CCMHockey, can you comment on the width of a 70K D/EE vs 9090 Tacks D, specifically the spot right at the edge of the toe box?

I tried the 70K in a D width and it fit great with the exception of that spot, which was a tiny bit narrow. A single bake didn't resolve it, but I did not try any punching, etc.

The 9090 in a D width is pretty good for me in that spot, but I have other minor issues with the rest of the fit.  I also much prefer the construction of the 70K.

Any thoughts?

Thanks.

Good question, thanks for asking. We always recommend the closest fit for your heel since that is the hardest part of the boot to make changes to. Given that, 70K D is going to be your best bet based on what you're saying. The Ribcor toe box is shorter than the Tacks so you have a better chance of molding that area since you'll likely be pushing up against the extremely moldable quarter rather than the injected toecap. We always recommend another bake before trying anything else and if that doesn't help, the move is to get a boot punch from a dealer you trust to do the work. We don't recommend trying to modify the boot yourself since you can permanently damage the skate if it's done incorrectly. Good luck with the adjustment!

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