Jump to content
Slate Blackcurrant Watermelon Strawberry Orange Banana Apple Emerald Chocolate Marble
Slate Blackcurrant Watermelon Strawberry Orange Banana Apple Emerald Chocolate Marble
marka

TRUE TF9/TF7 skates

Recommended Posts

57 minutes ago, smcgreg said:

To renew my comments on this skate based on the experience with my son.  I guess I should mention his particulars:  15 yr old.  HS/AAA caliber.  Skates 5+ times per week.  Old skate is Mako.

So, we got him 6.5 TF9s for Christmas and determined those were too big.  So, we had to go down a size (or more, since the Makos were starting to hurt).  We went with 6s after trying 5.5s as well.  After baking he was thrilled.  They felt as comfy and well-fitting as his Makos.  So, he was excited to skate on them for the first time.  First impressions after the first skate, he was less than thrilled.  I've been very rigorous in keeping my expectations to myself.  I assumed there would be some major differences to deal with, but didn't want to influence his impressions and thought some things might be different, but better with adaptation.  Anyway....

1.  Boot was still comfy, so, no issue there.  Coming from Makos, that's a pretty strong testament.  Not one complaint on the first skate after coming from the most comfortable skate ever made... (retail).

2. Boot seemed heavy.  (I anticipated this one). 

3.  Said if felt like going from rollerblades back to ice.... no for-aft stability. 

4.  Turns were good.

5.  Shot sucked.  (again, I anticipated this since there is more height off the ice than his Makos).

6.  Said if telt like ski boots when you walk and you're kicked forward/pushed forward.

Differences that are obvious aside from the boot that can explain some of these observations. 

1.  Pitch seems aggressive on the TF9s.  We have been profiling the Makos with a negative 2 to reduce the aggressiveness of the CXN pitch and make it more like a Vapor.  Measuring with a tape measure, there is still an extra 1/4in difference from back to front vs the Makos, so, that explains #6 above.

2. It seems the stock profile is around 9ft?  Coming from an 11 ft on him Makos, that would explain #3 above, I think.  This might also explain why turns were better #4?  Shorter radius should make for better tight turns, correct?

3.  the height difference compared to his Makos is about 1/2 in at the back and about 1/4 in at the front (measure with tape measure, so, grain of salt).  So, this would explain #5 due to stick being too short. 

So.... it seems like most of the issues can be addressed with a profile (11 ft and -1 pitch) and lengthening the stick 1/4 to 1/2 in. 

The only issue remaining would be weight. .....  So, the dilemma is, stick with them and profile or start the search for a different skate that fits (tall order) and weighs less. 

Sorry for lots of words, but hopefully it helps others who may be dealing with similar issues. 

 

 

I have been in this scenario with my skates and my sons. I started with the profile and was always able to get it dialed in. 

My Mako, supreme and Vapors all feel the same  all with different holders.  For reference, The stock CXN holder and steel on the makos where perfect for me.

what is the weight difference between a Mako and TF9 in a similar size?

 

Edited by sturdy22
Clarity

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, smcgreg said:

To renew my comments on this skate based on the experience with my son.  I guess I should mention his particulars:  15 yr old.  HS/AAA caliber.  Skates 5+ times per week.  Old skate is Mako.

So, we got him 6.5 TF9s for Christmas and determined those were too big.  So, we had to go down a size (or more, since the Makos were starting to hurt).  We went with 6s after trying 5.5s as well.  After baking he was thrilled.  They felt as comfy and well-fitting as his Makos.  So, he was excited to skate on them for the first time.  First impressions after the first skate, he was less than thrilled.  I've been very rigorous in keeping my expectations to myself.  I assumed there would be some major differences to deal with, but didn't want to influence his impressions and thought some things might be different, but better with adaptation.  Anyway....

1.  Boot was still comfy, so, no issue there.  Coming from Makos, that's a pretty strong testament.  Not one complaint on the first skate after coming from the most comfortable skate ever made... (retail).

2. Boot seemed heavy.  (I anticipated this one). 

3.  Said if felt like going from rollerblades back to ice.... no for-aft stability. 

4.  Turns were good.

5.  Shot sucked.  (again, I anticipated this since there is more height off the ice than his Makos).

6.  Said if telt like ski boots when you walk and you're kicked forward/pushed forward.

Differences that are obvious aside from the boot that can explain some of these observations. 

1.  Pitch seems aggressive on the TF9s.  We have been profiling the Makos with a negative 2 to reduce the aggressiveness of the CXN pitch and make it more like a Vapor.  Measuring with a tape measure, there is still an extra 1/4in difference from back to front vs the Makos, so, that explains #6 above.

2. It seems the stock profile is around 9ft?  Coming from an 11 ft on him Makos, that would explain #3 above, I think.  This might also explain why turns were better #4?  Shorter radius should make for better tight turns, correct?

3.  the height difference compared to his Makos is about 1/2 in at the back and about 1/4 in at the front (measure with tape measure, so, grain of salt).  So, this would explain #5 due to stick being too short. 

So.... it seems like most of the issues can be addressed with a profile (11 ft and -1 pitch) and lengthening the stick 1/4 to 1/2 in. 

The only issue remaining would be weight. .....  So, the dilemma is, stick with them and profile or start the search for a different skate that fits (tall order) and weighs less. 

Sorry for lots of words, but hopefully it helps others who may be dealing with similar issues. 

 

 

You've found a boot that fits really well without having to go the custom route. I would stick with those and start with profiling, if that doesn't work you can always swap the holders. It's still cheaper than going custom.

 If you do end up swapping holders, you can consider using CXN holders. That way they'd be shorter, plus you can still find step steel for the CXN holders that's less aggressively pitched (although they're likely discontinued now that CCM owns Step. So if you go the CXN route you might want to grab at least 2 sets while you can). 

You can get a right size 6/6.5 CXN holder for $5 from Perani's: https://www.hockeyworld.com/EASTON-CXN-Blade-Holder-Sr

You can get a left size 6/6.5 CXN holder for $5 from Hockeymonkey: https://www.hockeymonkey.com/easton-hockey-holder-cxn.html

You can get Step CXN steel for size 6 holders for $49.95 CAD from The Hockey Shop: https://www.thehockeyshop.com/products/steel-nash-easton-mako-sr-2pk-step?variant=31746752577602

Even after you add shipping, get a backup set of steel and pay around $40 for the holder swap, you'd still come out ahead vs. going custom or buying a top end CCM or Bauer skate. 

1 hour ago, sturdy22 said:

I have been in this scenario with my skates and my sons. I started with the profile and was always able to get it dialed in. 

My Mako, supreme and Vapors all feel the same  all with different holders.

what is the weight difference between a Mako and TF9 in a similar size?

 

According to Pure Hockey the size 8D TF9 is 904 grams. The OG Mako was about 819 grams and the Mako II was 839 grams in that size. So the True's are heavier, but it's not a massive difference (65-85 grams). 

Edited by althoma1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
26 minutes ago, althoma1 said:

You've found a boot that fits really well without having to go the custom route. I would stick with those and start with profiling, if that doesn't work you can always swap the holders. It's still cheaper than going custom.

 If you do end up swapping holders, you can consider using CXN holders. That way they'd be shorter, plus you can still find step steel for the CXN holders that's less aggressively pitched (although they're likely discontinued now that CCM owns Step. So if you go the CXN route you might want to grab at least 2 sets while you can). 

You can get a right size 6/6.5 CXN holder for $5 from Perani's: https://www.hockeyworld.com/EASTON-CXN-Blade-Holder-Sr

You can get a left size 6/6.5 CXN holder for $5 from Hockeymonkey: https://www.hockeymonkey.com/easton-hockey-holder-cxn.html

You can get Step CXN steel for size 6 holders for $49.95 CAD from The Hockey Shop: https://www.thehockeyshop.com/products/steel-nash-easton-mako-sr-2pk-step?variant=31746752577602

Even after you add shipping, get a backup set of steel and pay around $40 for the holder swap, you'd still come out ahead vs. going custom or buying a top end CCM or Bauer skate. 

According to Pure Hockey the size 8D TF9 is 904 grams. The OG Mako was about 819grams and the Mako II was 839grams in that size. So the True's are heavier, but it's not a massive difference (60-80grams). 

So, from my understanding, CXN steel is no longer available.  That's why I accelerated the move to True or another skate.  I found the last set of Step CXNs I could find in N.A. in Sept.  That steel is done.  Since Step was purchased by CCM, they stopped making the CXN... or at least that's what I was lead to believe in the Fall. 

I get what you're saying though.  Going from Mako straight to another skate without boot issues would be unheard of in any other retail skate, I expect.  Especially since he has flat feet and has had issues with other boots he's tried for roller hockey. 

For the weight, the other thing that has been a concern is a puck off the foot in Makos.  He's a defenseman and it was a matter of time before he broke a foot at the level he plays at in those skates.  They're like running shoes.  So, a beafier boot or shot blockers are going to add weight, no two ways about it.  So, in some ways, a necessary evil. 

So, I'm in agreement with your assessment for the most part.  As I told him when he came off the ice with a grumpy face..... if the boot feels good, everything else can be fixed with profile or different holder.  In fact, the profile change I wrote in my last response will fix 90% of the issues, if not all, I expect.  Agility is an issue right now though at the level he plays.  Increased weight won't increase agility, but we'll see if the weight perception was more about a skate that didnt' respond the way he expected as opposed to actually being heavier. 

Thanks for the feedback.  You in particular have always been very helpful in Mako related issues, so, much appreciated.

Happy New Year. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 minutes ago, smcgreg said:

So, from my understanding, CXN steel is no longer available.  That's why I accelerated the move to True or another skate.  I found the last set of Step CXNs I could find in N.A. in Sept.  That steel is done.  Since Step was purchased by CCM, they stopped making the CXN... or at least that's what I was lead to believe in the Fall. 

There's a limited supply of CXN Step and it isn't being produced anymore, but it's still out there right now. Here's some that I could find (unless the inventory hasn't been updated on the websites):

https://www.thehockeyshop.com/products/steel-nash-easton-mako-sr-2pk-step

https://www.hockeyvancouver.ca/products/step-steel-easton-mako-skate-runners?variant=21204487302

https://www.bayareahockeyrepair.com/product/step-steel-st-mako-standard-steel-runners-fits-easton-cxn-holder/

https://www.ebay.ca/itm/Step-Steel-Easton-Mako-Skate-Runners-Steel-Blades-Fit-CXN-Holders-All-Sizes-/272347031165

https://hockeysupremacy.com/products/step-steel-runners-for-easton-cxn-holder-pair?variant=31951918465106

Not that you have to swap to the CXN holders, but right now it seems like there's still a reasonable supply of the Step CXN steel. The actual Easton ES4 steel on the hand; that's much harder to find. 

Anyway, I hope you can tweak the Trues so your son is as happy on the ice as he was off the ice. Happy New Year!

Edited by althoma1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey @althoma1 wouldn't it just be more prudent, if he's going to swap holders, to just go to the xs holder if he's partial to step or lightspeeds if he doesn't have to have step? If you're anyway profiling the runners to -2 to offset the cxn pitch I don't see what the point of chasing down a discontinued holder and runners. Just looking at it from the other side, if he's 15 he's going to eventually have to get used to something else sooner or later, why not just do it now? Better to invest in something that's still in production IMO. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, you have a point. If the profiling isn't enough, going to something like the CCM XS holder probably makes more sense since it will have Step available and is still in production. I was just thinking that the CXN was cheaper, he's used to it already and he could stock up on a couple spare holders (at $5 each, why not) and a second set of clearance steel. With the extra parts it should outlast the skate. You're right about him having to get used to a newer holder eventually though. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, althoma1 said:

Yeah, you have a point. If the profiling isn't enough, going to something like the CCM XS holder probably makes more sense since it will have Step available and is still in production. I was just thinking that the CXN was cheaper, he's used to it already and he could stock up on a couple spare holders (at $5 each, why not) and a second set of clearance steel. With the extra parts it should outlast the skate. You're right about him having to get used to a newer holder eventually though. 

You have a point with the price, definitely a nice deal and cheap enough to load up. I guess he could stock up to last quite a while at that price. The only real loss then is the quick change ability and having to carry a cxn tool around

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Short term, switching to CXN holders may be cheaper and make the adjustment to the new skate easier, but long term getting used to a holder that's in production (as you suggested) makes more sense. Hopefully profiling the True holders does the trick and no holder swap is needed. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Miller55 said:

Hey @althoma1 wouldn't it just be more prudent, if he's going to swap holders, to just go to the xs holder if he's partial to step or lightspeeds if he doesn't have to have step? If you're anyway profiling the runners to -2 to offset the cxn pitch I don't see what the point of chasing down a discontinued holder and runners. Just looking at it from the other side, if he's 15 he's going to eventually have to get used to something else sooner or later, why not just do it now? Better to invest in something that's still in production IMO. 

Yeah, that was part of the thought equation for me.  Actually, when Easton went out of business years ago, the thought was we'd buy a bunch of skates to fill the gap until something was available as an alternative in a few years.  I assumed it would be Bauer, but ended up being True.  So, now the time has come.  At the end of the day, a negative profile or alternative holder is a simple solution if the boot works, especially at the TF9 price point. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, althoma1 said:

Short term, switching to CXN holders may be cheaper and make the adjustment to the new skate easier, but long term getting used to a holder that's in production (as you suggested) makes more sense. Hopefully profiling the True holders does the trick and no holder swap is needed. 

Having already swapped holders when we first switched from Bauer to Makos, I don't want to go that route again if other options are available.  Since I've thought about it the past day or so, a negative profile should fix the issue, or at least one.  Longer radius will fix another one

If it were me, it would be a different story.  I can/like doing stuff on the cheap and making it work.  For a kid that will be traveling without parents and on his own soon, not the best.  Plus he was looking forward to not having guys look at his skates and think he's the weird guy every time he goes into a new lockerroom. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, smcgreg said:

Plus he was looking forward to not having guys look at his skates and think he's the weird guy every time he goes into a new lockerroom. 

Lol, in not sure if the baby blue on the TF 9 helps that cause lol

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
26 minutes ago, Miller55 said:

Lol, in not sure if the baby blue on the TF 9 helps that cause lol

Compared to putting on Makos in a lockerroom full of people you don't know?........  Probably anything helps.   I get your point though.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 12/31/2020 at 12:38 PM, smcgreg said:

To renew my comments on this skate based on the experience with my son.  I guess I should mention his particulars:  15 yr old.  HS/AAA caliber.  Skates 5+ times per week.  Old skate is Mako.

So, we got him 6.5 TF9s for Christmas and determined those were too big.  So, we had to go down a size (or more, since the Makos were starting to hurt).  We went with 6s after trying 5.5s as well.  After baking he was thrilled.  They felt as comfy and well-fitting as his Makos.  So, he was excited to skate on them for the first time.  First impressions after the first skate, he was less than thrilled.  I've been very rigorous in keeping my expectations to myself.  I assumed there would be some major differences to deal with, but didn't want to influence his impressions and thought some things might be different, but better with adaptation.  Anyway....

1.  Boot was still comfy, so, no issue there.  Coming from Makos, that's a pretty strong testament.  Not one complaint on the first skate after coming from the most comfortable skate ever made... (retail).

2. Boot seemed heavy.  (I anticipated this one). 

3.  Said if felt like going from rollerblades back to ice.... no for-aft stability. 

4.  Turns were good.

5.  Shot sucked.  (again, I anticipated this since there is more height off the ice than his Makos).

6.  Said if telt like ski boots when you walk and you're kicked forward/pushed forward.

Differences that are obvious aside from the boot that can explain some of these observations. 

1.  Pitch seems aggressive on the TF9s.  We have been profiling the Makos with a negative 2 to reduce the aggressiveness of the CXN pitch and make it more like a Vapor.  Measuring with a tape measure, there is still an extra 1/4in difference from back to front vs the Makos, so, that explains #6 above.

2. It seems the stock profile is around 9ft?  Coming from an 11 ft on him Makos, that would explain #3 above, I think.  This might also explain why turns were better #4?  Shorter radius should make for better tight turns, correct?

3.  the height difference compared to his Makos is about 1/2 in at the back and about 1/4 in at the front (measure with tape measure, so, grain of salt).  So, this would explain #5 due to stick being too short. 

So.... it seems like most of the issues can be addressed with a profile (11 ft and -1 pitch) and lengthening the stick 1/4 to 1/2 in. 

The only issue remaining would be weight. .....  So, the dilemma is, stick with them and profile or start the search for a different skate that fits (tall order) and weighs less. 

Sorry for lots of words, but hopefully it helps others who may be dealing with similar issues. 

 

 

I struggled with the Shift holders. After a few tries at profiling I eventually swapped them out for Tuuks and immediately felt at home. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, pucks_putts said:

I struggled with the Shift holders. After a few tries at profiling I eventually swapped them out for Tuuks and immediately felt at home. 

Yeah, I guess that's easy for somebody coming from TUUKS, but the holder, per se, shouldn't matter if all of the parameters can be matched with profile. 

I think that was althoma1's point earlier in this thread, that if we went to CXNs, it would be the fastest way to get exactly what he wants.  Having messed with profiles over the years to replicate the feel of different skates, I'm pretty sure we can get there with the profile.  Once that's nailed down, then we never have to worry about swapping holders.  I'm just not a fan of that approach for a number of reasons.

There's nothing inherently bad about the Shift holder is there?   Something I should be aware of?

Thanks,

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, smcgreg said:

Yeah, I guess that's easy for somebody coming from TUUKS, but the holder, per se, shouldn't matter if all of the parameters can be matched with profile. 

I think that was althoma1's point earlier in this thread, that if we went to CXNs, it would be the fastest way to get exactly what he wants.  Having messed with profiles over the years to replicate the feel of different skates, I'm pretty sure we can get there with the profile.  Once that's nailed down, then we never have to worry about swapping holders.  I'm just not a fan of that approach for a number of reasons.

There's nothing inherently bad about the Shift holder is there?   Something I should be aware of?

Thanks,

If you read around on the True Custom / VH thread a lot of guys talk about how the Shift holders are actually quite different from the others. I don’t know much about the CXN but I know that the XS is designed very much like the Tuuks for the specific reason of how popular Tuuks are with pros. I’m guessing the CXN isn’t far from Tuuk either since they dominated that era. I can’t remember all the details but three of the key points are:

1) They have a very aggressive forward pitch. More so than any of the other holders. Combine this with the boot that also is designed for more forward pitch and personally I felt like I was falling forward all the time and though I somewhat adjusted it never felt right to me. 

2) The Shift holder is designed to put more steel under and behind the heel. Supposedly this is better for skating but again personally this was the most uncomfortable aspect for me. I felt like my toes were “hanging” way out over the front of the steel. Just not a good feeling for me and I “toe picked” a LOT amy first few times out. 

3) The Shift is a Symmetrical holder. Meaning there is no difference between the left and right holders. They have the exact same rivet pattern and “down angle” to the steel. There is a lot of science behind this part and I’m not sure if this really made a huge difference but some people on here says this changes the distribution of weight and downward force into the steel this affecting stride and balance point. 

Again, there are some much more knowledgeable people than I on here and I’m just relaying my personal experience. I can’t personally comment too much on #3 because 1 + 2 were so prominent for me. 

Lastly I want to add that I know a few excellent skaters that kept the Shift holders and like them. Upon asking they all said that it was a bit of an adjustment but that after a few weeks they didn’t have any issues. 

I think it may come down to trial and error unfortunately. Good luck and I want to close by saying that my True’s are the best fitting and performing skate I’ve owned and I’ve owned many. Absolutely love the boot and will never buy a skate that isn’t built off a mold of my foot ever again. 

Edited by pucks_putts
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I personally like the SHIFT holder a lot. The only downside is the limited selection of steel available. I know Bladetech will be releasing steel for the holder soon and I hope Flare does the same. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, SkateWorksPNW said:

I personally like the SHIFT holder a lot. The only downside is the limited selection of steel available. I know Bladetech will be releasing steel for the holder soon and I hope Flare does the same. 

When they do, I hope there’s more steel on them than the Step True for Shift holders...  after a profile I feel like there’s not a ton of life left on the blade...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, JV23 said:

When they do, I hope there’s more steel on them than the Step True for Shift holders...  after a profile I feel like there’s not a ton of life left on the blade...

The new steel they have been shipping is significantly taller. Both the STEP steel (whats left) and the stainless and black steel.

They will also have DLC available directly from TRUE for the SHIFT holder sometime in 2021 as well.  

Edited by SkateWorksPNW
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 12/31/2020 at 9:38 PM, smcgreg said:

To renew my comments on this skate based on the experience with my son.  I guess I should mention his particulars:  15 yr old.  HS/AAA caliber.  Skates 5+ times per week.  Old skate is Mako.

So, we got him 6.5 TF9s for Christmas and determined those were too big.  So, we had to go down a size (or more, since the Makos were starting to hurt).  We went with 6s after trying 5.5s as well.  After baking he was thrilled.  They felt as comfy and well-fitting as his Makos.  So, he was excited to skate on them for the first time.  First impressions after the first skate, he was less than thrilled.  I've been very rigorous in keeping my expectations to myself.  I assumed there would be some major differences to deal with, but didn't want to influence his impressions and thought some things might be different, but better with adaptation.  Anyway....

1.  Boot was still comfy, so, no issue there.  Coming from Makos, that's a pretty strong testament.  Not one complaint on the first skate after coming from the most comfortable skate ever made... (retail).

2. Boot seemed heavy.  (I anticipated this one). 

3.  Said if felt like going from rollerblades back to ice.... no for-aft stability. 

4.  Turns were good.

5.  Shot sucked.  (again, I anticipated this since there is more height off the ice than his Makos).

6.  Said if telt like ski boots when you walk and you're kicked forward/pushed forward.

Differences that are obvious aside from the boot that can explain some of these observations. 

1.  Pitch seems aggressive on the TF9s.  We have been profiling the Makos with a negative 2 to reduce the aggressiveness of the CXN pitch and make it more like a Vapor.  Measuring with a tape measure, there is still an extra 1/4in difference from back to front vs the Makos, so, that explains #6 above.

2. It seems the stock profile is around 9ft?  Coming from an 11 ft on him Makos, that would explain #3 above, I think.  This might also explain why turns were better #4?  Shorter radius should make for better tight turns, correct?

3.  the height difference compared to his Makos is about 1/2 in at the back and about 1/4 in at the front (measure with tape measure, so, grain of salt).  So, this would explain #5 due to stick being too short. 

So.... it seems like most of the issues can be addressed with a profile (11 ft and -1 pitch) and lengthening the stick 1/4 to 1/2 in. 

The only issue remaining would be weight. .....  So, the dilemma is, stick with them and profile or start the search for a different skate that fits (tall order) and weighs less. 

Sorry for lots of words, but hopefully it helps others who may be dealing with similar issues. 

I'm curious to hear if the perceived weight changes once the blades are profiled. I've experienced boots that went from feeling nimble and responsive to sluggish and leaden from swapping out old for new steel.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, pucks_putts said:

If you read around on the True Custom / VH thread a lot of guys talk about how the Shift holders are actually quite different from the others. I don’t know much about the CXN but I know that the XS is designed very much like the Tuuks for the specific reason of how popular Tuuks are with pros. I’m guessing the CXN isn’t far from Tuuk either since they dominated that era. I can’t remember all the details but three of the key points are:

1) They have a very aggressive forward pitch. More so than any of the other holders. Combine this with the boot that also is designed for more forward pitch and personally I felt like I was falling forward all the time and though I somewhat adjusted it never felt right to me. 

2) The Shift holder is designed to put more steel under and behind the heel. Supposedly this is better for skating but again personally this was the most uncomfortable aspect for me. I felt like my toes were “hanging” way out over the front of the steel. Just not a good feeling for me and I “toe picked” a LOT amy first few times out. 

3) The Shift is a Symmetrical holder. Meaning there is no difference between the left and right holders. They have the exact same rivet pattern and “down angle” to the steel. There is a lot of science behind this part and I’m not sure if this really made a huge difference but some people on here says this changes the distribution of weight and downward force into the steel this affecting stride and balance point. 

Again, there are some much more knowledgeable people than I on here and I’m just relaying my personal experience. I can’t personally comment too much on #3 because 1 + 2 were so prominent for me. 

Lastly I want to add that I know a few excellent skaters that kept the Shift holders and like them. Upon asking they all said that it was a bit of an adjustment but that after a few weeks they didn’t have any issues. 

I think it may come down to trial and error unfortunately. Good luck and I want to close by saying that my True’s are the best fitting and performing skate I’ve owned and I’ve owned many. Absolutely love the boot and will never buy a skate that isn’t built off a mold of my foot ever again. 

1) Right, I addressed this.  That's a fairly easy fix if that's the only issue.

2) Ok, I didn't realize this.  Theoretically, if the balance point is correct, then this shouldn't matter.  Of course, not all things hold up in practice relative to theory. 

3) I'd forgotten about this.  I remember when it first came out, this was talked about, but I had forgotten.  I'll need to go back and learn more about this.

In closing, when I got Makos when they came out, I tried to adapt to the aggressive pitch becuase I believed it was supposed to be better for me.  I gave it more than a year and finally relented.  Once I went to a negative pitch on my Makos I was immediately better even after a year of "adaptation".  I'm old, so, it's hard to teach an old dog new tricks, but my son arguably has more hours skating in his set up than I did before getting makos, so, he has some heavily ingrained preferences, which work quite well for him.

Thanks for the feedback and insight.  I'll need to look into the asymmetrical thing again.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, flip12 said:

I'm curious to hear if the perceived weight changes once the blades are profiled. I've experienced boots that went from feeling nimble and responsive to sluggish and leaden from swapping out old for new steel.

Yeah, with all the negative comments, it was hard to sort the wheat from the chaff... 😉   He was so grumpy it took quite a lot to get all of the issues out of him in a specific manner for diagnostic purposes.  The one comment.... "he couldn't control them" makes me think you're right.  That after a profile and dialing things in more to his liking, they won't feel as heavy. 

Compared to the Makos though, they are tanks, so, I also won't be surprised if they still seem heavy.  It doesn't matter though.  He was going to have a broken foot sooner or later if he didnt' get another skate or start wearing shot blockers. The latter wasn't going to happen, so, beefier skates are a godsend in that regard.

We'll see.  Probably won't get profiled until midweek, so, he's back to Makos for a couple skates.   

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, smcgreg said:

Yeah, with all the negative comments, it was hard to sort the wheat from the chaff... 😉   He was so grumpy it took quite a lot to get all of the issues out of him in a specific manner for diagnostic purposes.  The one comment.... "he couldn't control them" makes me think you're right.  That after a profile and dialing things in more to his liking, they won't feel as heavy. 

Compared to the Makos though, they are tanks, so, I also won't be surprised if they still seem heavy.  It doesn't matter though.  He was going to have a broken foot sooner or later if he didnt' get another skate or start wearing shot blockers. The latter wasn't going to happen, so, beefier skates are a godsend in that regard.

We'll see.  Probably won't get profiled until midweek, so, he's back to Makos for a couple skates.   

I'm kind of surprised that his Mako skates which are now likely water logged, weigh less than the TF9 still....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yesterday i had the chance to skate for the first time in my new TF7. All rinks are closed due to lockdown since mid of november. A small lake 40km away has build ice to skate on since last week. The ice condition was terrible and i didn`t skate since two months.

My former skates have been Supremes 180, 6.5D with a 11´ radius and a +2 forward pitch(Blackstone). They don´t have enough volume and they are a few mm to short. Lacing too loose my toes get squeezed and lacing too tight my insteps and arches get squeezed.

That´s why i´m trying the Trues. They are 6.5R and have been sharpened out of the box without profiling. I was baking them with the saran wrap method and they fit like a glove. I was trying to break them in at home on the carpet several times. They have a little more volume, are some mm´s longer and have a better wrap than the Supremes.

The skating experience was fine with good support from the skates and a little pain in my footsole. The length is ok, toes touching the cap while standing and not touching while skating or sitting. I´m assuming that they will give some more lenght and volume after breaking in.

Two things that i noticed: They are way more agile and a little less stable than my supremes, maybe due to a shorter profile. And they have less forward pitch than my supremes. Has anyone a definite information about the profile radius (e.g. icewarehouse says 9' & 10') and the pitch of the TF7?

At first i would give them more hours on the ice. I like the new agility, but would go up to a 10´ profile if the profile is 9´and add a +1 forward pitch if i can´t adapt. Or should i try a Quad Zero profile?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, hockeydad3 said:

Yesterday i had the chance to skate for the first time in my new TF7. All rinks are closed due to lockdown since mid of november. A small lake 40km away has build ice to skate on since last week. The ice condition was terrible and i didn`t skate since two months.

My former skates have been Supremes 180, 6.5D with a 11´ radius and a +2 forward pitch(Blackstone). They don´t have enough volume and they are a few mm to short. Lacing too loose my toes get squeezed and lacing too tight my insteps and arches get squeezed.

That´s why i´m trying the Trues. They are 6.5R and have been sharpened out of the box without profiling. I was baking them with the saran wrap method and they fit like a glove. I was trying to break them in at home on the carpet several times. They have a little more volume, are some mm´s longer and have a better wrap than the Supremes.

The skating experience was fine with good support from the skates and a little pain in my footsole. The length is ok, toes touching the cap while standing and not touching while skating or sitting. I´m assuming that they will give some more lenght and volume after breaking in.

Two things that i noticed: They are way more agile and a little less stable than my supremes, maybe due to a shorter profile. And they have less forward pitch than my supremes. Has anyone a definite information about the profile radius (e.g. icewarehouse says 9' & 10') and the pitch of the TF7?

At first i would give them more hours on the ice. I like the new agility, but would go up to a 10´ profile if the profile is 9´and add a +1 forward pitch if i can´t adapt. Or should i try a Quad Zero profile?

I haven't skated on Supremes in ages, but given the measurements I made on my son's TF9s in conjunction with the rest of the comments regarding pitch in this thread, I'm hard pressed to believe Supremes have a more aggressive pitch than TFs.  I would skate on proper ice before increasing the pitch on them.  I'm sure others will chime in with more quantitative response, but the TFs (at least the 9s, I just got) have a very aggressive ptich.  In fact, the most common complaint I've read regarding the TFs is the pitch is too aggressive fore most to become comfortable with and switching to TUUK holders fixes the issue immediately. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...