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TRUE TF9/TF7 skates

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6 hours ago, Vet88 said:

fwiw - comments I have received from True about their skate length:-

"The internal measurement of True skates are a 1/4 size longer than the equivalent internal measurement of Bauer skates. The external measurement of True skates is longer than equivalent sized Bauer skates because of features in the True boot and it's design - for example the True one piece shell has an inner carbon toe box that is covered by an external toe box."

Sadly their is no rational explanation as to why someone who can fit their foot (25.5cm long) into a size 6D Bauer (with toes just off the toe cap) can fit the same foot into a 5.5R True skate (with about a 1/4 size of room to spare). True insist that their skate sizings are equivalent to Bauer and refuse to acknowledge that the internal measurements of their skates are at least a 1/2 to 3/4 size larger than same sized Bauer skates.

It's the CCM debacle all over again. At least CCM fronted up about it, eventually. One can only hope True will bite the bullet and do the same and fix their sizing in the next release, this was alluded to me by the comment "as we incorporate your feedback into the development of our next skate models".

I was told the same thing. 

I wonder though if the sizing becomes off once you hit a certain length, for example, anything over a size 5.0 the sizing becomes more skewed than in an intermediate/junior skate? 

I know many individuals who bought skates for their younger kids, sizes ranging between 3.5-5.0, and they said the skates fit perfectly without any issues. It could be kids of that age don't really know how a skate should fit or maybe they struggle with conveying a sizing issue if there is one.

I just wonder if the issue is more with certain specific sizes more than others. Many individuals who have had sizing issues are in senior skates with sizes ranging between 6.0-9.0, myself included. 

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7 hours ago, SkateWorksPNW said:

I was told the same thing. 

I wonder though if the sizing becomes off once you hit a certain length, for example, anything over a size 5.0 the sizing becomes more skewed than in an intermediate/junior skate? 

I know many individuals who bought skates for their younger kids, sizes ranging between 3.5-5.0, and they said the skates fit perfectly without any issues. It could be kids of that age don't really know how a skate should fit or maybe they struggle with conveying a sizing issue if there is one.

I just wonder if the issue is more with certain specific sizes more than others. Many individuals who have had sizing issues are in senior skates with sizes ranging between 6.0-9.0, myself included. 

True was already making retail skates on junior sizes before the TF release, so that might be why they have their sizes locked in better in that range.

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2 hours ago, hockeydad3 said:

My LHS guy told me I could cut the edge of the felt tongue to improve the wrap of my TF7 skates. Have any of you heard of it or done it yourself?

I used to do this on my skates with felt tongues. If you look at used pro stock skates you'll see a lot of pros do this too. Do you need more wrap?

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The TF7's are my best fitting skates ever. I baked them with the shrink wrap method. My feet have a high instep, flat arch, normal width, normal forefoot and need a good wrap around the ankles. I'm getting a strong pain in my footsole if I ty my laces too tight, but I need a good lock to prevent my toes touching the cap too much. So I'm thinking about an optimization of the wrap. 

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7 hours ago, hockeydad3 said:

The TF7's are my best fitting skates ever. I baked them with the shrink wrap method. My feet have a high instep, flat arch, normal width, normal forefoot and need a good wrap around the ankles. I'm getting a strong pain in my footsole if I ty my laces too tight, but I need a good lock to prevent my toes touching the cap too much. So I'm thinking about an optimization of the wrap. 

That would definitely help. The downside is once you remove the felt if you take too much off you cannot add any back. Also, don't forget that over a period of time the felt will compress. Maybe consider buying some of the thin TRUE tongues? I have seen them sell for $25-30 if you look around on eBay, sidelineswap, and such. 

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9 hours ago, hockeydad3 said:

The TF7's are my best fitting skates ever. I baked them with the shrink wrap method. My feet have a high instep, flat arch, normal width, normal forefoot and need a good wrap around the ankles. I'm getting a strong pain in my footsole if I ty my laces too tight, but I need a good lock to prevent my toes touching the cap too much. So I'm thinking about an optimization of the wrap. 

Have you tried adding some padding above your toes in the box? True sticks with the Velcro attachment of the tongue to facilitate shifting the tongue up or down over the toes, similar to adding POWERFOOT inserts. This can relieve enough toecap pressure if you need something to help bide the time until the foams compress a bit, which could also help in time. Eventually you might not need anything to take the edge off, depending on how much the foams compress.

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1 hour ago, flip12 said:

Have you tried adding some padding above your toes in the box? True sticks with the Velcro attachment of the tongue to facilitate shifting the tongue up or down over the toes, similar to adding POWERFOOT inserts. This can relieve enough toecap pressure if you need something to help bide the time until the foams compress a bit, which could also help in time. Eventually you might not need anything to take the edge off, depending on how much the foams compress.

My target is to get a better ankle-/heellock without the need of tying the laces close to my painlimit. I have very little room between tying my laces too loose or too tight. Maybe I should give the skates more time to break in and do another bake.

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1 minute ago, hockeydad3 said:

My target is to get a better ankle-/heellock without the need of tying the laces close to my painlimit. I have very little room between tying my laces too loose or too tight. Maybe I should give the skates more time to break in and do another bake.

I would do another bake, and if you are using wax laces switch to normal unwaxed laces. 

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12 hours ago, hockeydad3 said:

but I need a good lock to prevent my toes touching the cap too much. 

to which I'd have said they are possibly a 1/2 size too small?

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I would definitely bake them again. I think you could probably bake them once a week the first few weeks and it would help a lot with dialing in the best fit. 

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1 hour ago, hockeydad3 said:

My target is to get a better ankle-/heellock without the need of tying the laces close to my painlimit. I have very little room between tying my laces too loose or too tight. Maybe I should give the skates more time to break in and do another bake.

I know. Stuffing the toe box might decouple your lacing pressure from your toes cramming in the toe box.

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On 1/10/2021 at 1:35 PM, smcgreg said:

Following up to this reply to help maintain some continuity. 

Today, my son skated on his TF9s in two back to back games for the first time since profiling to 10 ft and -1 pitch.  As a reminder, he hated the stock profile out of the box and was miserable after one stick adn pucks.  As reference, he skated on his Makos in a game yesterday and decided to dive in head first for two games today for a number of reasons.  This was a fairly high level skate (college recruitment), but not at the AAA 15U level.  Since he skated one game yesterday, the Makos were fresh in his mind and TF9s were brand new and effectively novel to him since the profile was different.  I'll break it down by things I think made a difference.

1.  10 ft radius - Much better than stock.  He was visibly "teetering" back and forth on the stock profile at sticks and pucks.  It was probably a combination of things, but he commented he felt like there wasn't enough steel under his toes and heels.  No such comment today and no "teetering".

2.  minus 1 pitch - Again, much better than stock.  He commented that he still felt like he was being pushed forward a bit, but could probably get used to it.  Will give it a couple more skates. 

Other harder to attribute observations: 

3. Power transfer - He commented that he felt more powerful on them.  As support, after playing two back to back games, he felt less tired than the day before playing only one game on his Makos yesterday.  As corroboration, watching him, I thought he was going further on each stride. I commented on this to a friend before his comments.  So, not that this would be a specific True property, I just think the Mako footbed is breaking down and he's just getting better power transfer, resulting in greater stride efficiency and less fatigue.

4. He said they feel like "tanks".  Heavier, beffier, less agile.  They are heavier than Makos, but as I've stated before he needs more protection, so, any more protective skate will likely be heavier.  at this point, this is his only complaint and he accepts that nothing will feel like the Makos from here on out.  So, need to adjust and see if he can get the agility from these on top of the other benefits.

Finally, the fact that he skated two back to back games without any comfort issues in brand new skates is almost unheard of in any other brand, than Makos, I expect.  The only comfort complaint was a bit of rubbing at the cuff because they come up higher than Makos.  He's going to try higher socks next time to see if that fixes it, but if not, I'll heat and roll out the cuff.  Still, pretty impressive to get that knid of comfort/fit for $600. 

 

 

Probably the last follow up on this for a while.  The details that got us to this point are in previous posts above.  In general though, decent 15 yr old moving from Makos to TF9s.  The last post was referencing fixes we made to the stock profile to address his complaints after the first couple skates.  After that last post we made another change to the profile and points are listed below. 

1. Additional (-1) pitch.  After the 2nd profile above, he still felt the pitch was too aggressive, so, we took it back another notch.  This made it 10ft (- 2) pitch.  After measuring it compared to his makos, it still appeared to be effectively 1/4" higher back to front compared to Makos that were -2 from stock. 

After this, he felt it was better, but still felt like it was "pushing him forward too much".  We gave it a week to see how he adapted (skating everyday) and if no improvement would profile and take it back another (-2) to a (-4) total. This seemed very extreme to me, but given the previous changes and the existing difference between the  old makos, I thought this is how we would get to where we needed to be. 

After 7 skates on the second profile, comments continued to be... 1) much faster in straight line open ice skating than the Makos 2) he uses a lot less energy to go faster.  Consistently less tired than norma. 3) tight turns better than the Makos but.... 4) agility and footwork bad.  Skates felt "heavy", "like tanks", "clumsy".   So, 1)-3) are big positives, but 4) is a killer.

One observation that he was getting a bit of a hot spot where the top of the cuff was rubbing above his ankle made me think of something else.  He commented that the TF9s were higher than the Makos.  He laced his Makos one eyelet from top, and had the TF9s one eyelet from the top.  So, the last skate before we got them profiled, I asked him to drop the lacing to the 2nd eyelet down.  That would make it closer to the actual Mako lacing pattern since the TF9s came up higher.  My thought was, it was more the lack of fore-aft flexibility was the issue.  He came off the ice and we were going to take them to my skate guy to get the profiled, he said, "don't bother, they're perfect"......  LOL.....  So, one day away from going to a (-4) profile and how knows where that would have sent us. 

Interestingly, as I say, the (-2) is still more aggressive than the Makos we had at (-2).  This is a bit surprising, since I assumed they would have a similar ptich.  This is a demonstration of a couple of things 1) how important ankle flexibility and range of motion is in the anterior/posterior plane for all aspects of skating, including footwork and agility and 2) how such a minor thing like 1 eyelet lacing pattern can make an enormous difference.  Not that this would be the case with everybody, but there are so many friggin variables when dialing in skates .... its' crazy. 

I'm still a bit surprised about the speed difference between the Makos and TF9s.  I'm going to attribute it to the Makos being on their last leg.  He always has rivet issues with them and I think the bottom outsole is just "worn out".  There' s a lot of give around the holder and outsole and that creates loss of power transfer.  Free speed though.... we'll take it!

We're going to do some testing fo the lacing patterns now to quantify the differences as far as top end speed and agility since it will be a very easy change to make and he "perceives" a huge difference.  I'm curious to how much of a difference it makes quantitatively. 

That's it for now.  Hope this helps others trying to nail these skates down.  No doubt they are comfy.  But that stock pitch is pretty aggressive for somebody who's got an ingrained skating pattern .

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1 hour ago, smcgreg said:

Probably the last follow up on this for a while.  The details that got us to this point are in previous posts above.  In general though, decent 15 yr old moving from Makos to TF9s.  The last post was referencing fixes we made to the stock profile to address his complaints after the first couple skates.  After that last post we made another change to the profile and points are listed below. 

1. Additional (-1) pitch.  After the 2nd profile above, he still felt the pitch was too aggressive, so, we took it back another notch.  This made it 10ft (- 2) pitch.  After measuring it compared to his makos, it still appeared to be effectively 1/4" higher back to front compared to Makos that were -2 from stock. 

After this, he felt it was better, but still felt like it was "pushing him forward too much".  We gave it a week to see how he adapted (skating everyday) and if no improvement would profile and take it back another (-2) to a (-4) total. This seemed very extreme to me, but given the previous changes and the existing difference between the  old makos, I thought this is how we would get to where we needed to be. 

After 7 skates on the second profile, comments continued to be... 1) much faster in straight line open ice skating than the Makos 2) he uses a lot less energy to go faster.  Consistently less tired than norma. 3) tight turns better than the Makos but.... 4) agility and footwork bad.  Skates felt "heavy", "like tanks", "clumsy".   So, 1)-3) are big positives, but 4) is a killer.

One observation that he was getting a bit of a hot spot where the top of the cuff was rubbing above his ankle made me think of something else.  He commented that the TF9s were higher than the Makos.  He laced his Makos one eyelet from top, and had the TF9s one eyelet from the top.  So, the last skate before we got them profiled, I asked him to drop the lacing to the 2nd eyelet down.  That would make it closer to the actual Mako lacing pattern since the TF9s came up higher.  My thought was, it was more the lack of fore-aft flexibility was the issue.  He came off the ice and we were going to take them to my skate guy to get the profiled, he said, "don't bother, they're perfect"......  LOL.....  So, one day away from going to a (-4) profile and how knows where that would have sent us. 

Interestingly, as I say, the (-2) is still more aggressive than the Makos we had at (-2).  This is a bit surprising, since I assumed they would have a similar ptich.  This is a demonstration of a couple of things 1) how important ankle flexibility and range of motion is in the anterior/posterior plane for all aspects of skating, including footwork and agility and 2) how such a minor thing like 1 eyelet lacing pattern can make an enormous difference.  Not that this would be the case with everybody, but there are so many friggin variables when dialing in skates .... its' crazy. 

I'm still a bit surprised about the speed difference between the Makos and TF9s.  I'm going to attribute it to the Makos being on their last leg.  He always has rivet issues with them and I think the bottom outsole is just "worn out".  There' s a lot of give around the holder and outsole and that creates loss of power transfer.  Free speed though.... we'll take it!

We're going to do some testing fo the lacing patterns now to quantify the differences as far as top end speed and agility since it will be a very easy change to make and he "perceives" a huge difference.  I'm curious to how much of a difference it makes quantitatively. 

That's it for now.  Hope this helps others trying to nail these skates down.  No doubt they are comfy.  But that stock pitch is pretty aggressive for somebody who's got an ingrained skating pattern .

May want to have him try skipping the 3rd from the top eyelet and lace the 2nd from the top eyelet. It will give him more lateral stability without hindering his forward flexion. 

Unless he is confident everything is 100% ideal and he doesn't want any more changes. Then leave it as it is. 

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1 hour ago, SkateWorksPNW said:

May want to have him try skipping the 3rd from the top eyelet and lace the 2nd from the top eyelet. It will give him more lateral stability without hindering his forward flexion. 

Unless he is confident everything is 100% ideal and he doesn't want any more changes. Then leave it as it is. 

So, would that be trying to mimic a "55 flex" thing?  I loved those and still use them myself. 

 

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2 hours ago, smcgreg said:

Probably the last follow up on this for a while.  The details that got us to this point are in previous posts above.  In general though, decent 15 yr old moving from Makos to TF9s.  The last post was referencing fixes we made to the stock profile to address his complaints after the first couple skates.  After that last post we made another change to the profile and points are listed below. 

1. Additional (-1) pitch.  After the 2nd profile above, he still felt the pitch was too aggressive, so, we took it back another notch.  This made it 10ft (- 2) pitch.  After measuring it compared to his makos, it still appeared to be effectively 1/4" higher back to front compared to Makos that were -2 from stock. 

After this, he felt it was better, but still felt like it was "pushing him forward too much".  We gave it a week to see how he adapted (skating everyday) and if no improvement would profile and take it back another (-2) to a (-4) total. This seemed very extreme to me, but given the previous changes and the existing difference between the  old makos, I thought this is how we would get to where we needed to be. 

After 7 skates on the second profile, comments continued to be... 1) much faster in straight line open ice skating than the Makos 2) he uses a lot less energy to go faster.  Consistently less tired than norma. 3) tight turns better than the Makos but.... 4) agility and footwork bad.  Skates felt "heavy", "like tanks", "clumsy".   So, 1)-3) are big positives, but 4) is a killer.

One observation that he was getting a bit of a hot spot where the top of the cuff was rubbing above his ankle made me think of something else.  He commented that the TF9s were higher than the Makos.  He laced his Makos one eyelet from top, and had the TF9s one eyelet from the top.  So, the last skate before we got them profiled, I asked him to drop the lacing to the 2nd eyelet down.  That would make it closer to the actual Mako lacing pattern since the TF9s came up higher.  My thought was, it was more the lack of fore-aft flexibility was the issue.  He came off the ice and we were going to take them to my skate guy to get the profiled, he said, "don't bother, they're perfect"......  LOL.....  So, one day away from going to a (-4) profile and how knows where that would have sent us. 

Interestingly, as I say, the (-2) is still more aggressive than the Makos we had at (-2).  This is a bit surprising, since I assumed they would have a similar ptich.  This is a demonstration of a couple of things 1) how important ankle flexibility and range of motion is in the anterior/posterior plane for all aspects of skating, including footwork and agility and 2) how such a minor thing like 1 eyelet lacing pattern can make an enormous difference.  Not that this would be the case with everybody, but there are so many friggin variables when dialing in skates .... its' crazy. 

I'm still a bit surprised about the speed difference between the Makos and TF9s.  I'm going to attribute it to the Makos being on their last leg.  He always has rivet issues with them and I think the bottom outsole is just "worn out".  There' s a lot of give around the holder and outsole and that creates loss of power transfer.  Free speed though.... we'll take it!

We're going to do some testing fo the lacing patterns now to quantify the differences as far as top end speed and agility since it will be a very easy change to make and he "perceives" a huge difference.  I'm curious to how much of a difference it makes quantitatively. 

That's it for now.  Hope this helps others trying to nail these skates down.  No doubt they are comfy.  But that stock pitch is pretty aggressive for somebody who's got an ingrained skating pattern .

How much higher are the TF9s compared to his Makos?

A softer tongue could help with the clunkiness/range of motion. The True tongues are decently stiff and with stiff boots that combo can kill a skate’s feel, especially for skaters that embrace range of motion in their stride.

Edited by flip12

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8 minutes ago, flip12 said:

How much higher are the TF9s compared to his Makos?

Well, that's  a really good question.  Based on this, I measured and..... they appear to be the same.  I took his word for it about the height, but it looks like the height of the cuff from the base of the outsole is the same on both skates.  Then, I measured the eyelets and with it down to the second hole on the TF9s, it appears to be lower by about a half an inch.

*caveat:  This is measuring with a tape measure assuming the bottom of the outsole on both skates represents where the bottom of his foot is.  Still, it doesn't look like there can be much difference in height of the cuff and he probably is lacing them lower than he was on the Makos. 

He commented on how much stiffer the boot is on the TF than the Makos, so, maybe it's not the height of the cuff, but just the sfiffness of the cuff? 

So, now the question is,.... would the additional (-2) profile have fixed the issue and the new lacing pattern is just allowing him to adapt to the aggressive pitch? 

One more relevant point here is, last year he laced the Makos an eyelet lower.  He was a freshman on the varsity team the coach told him to lace them one eyelet higher because it would make him faster to keep up with the older kids.  So, with the new lacing on the TFs, he's back to where he was on the Makos one year ago, which is really friggin low.. if you've ever worn Makos, but faster in the TFs for whatever reason.

Anyway, .....  I guess there is no difference in cuff height between the skates, just stiffness, but lower lacing helps, for whatever reason. 

Friggin skating........

 

 

 

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Do you have video of your son skating? He sounds a bit like me: I really struggled getting MLX to work for me. Right away I could tell they had extra power and better cornering than I had ever experienced (even more notably on FBV) but I couldn’t get over this disconnected feeling, especially on starts.

What ended up working best with the stock tongue was skipping the top two eyelets. Considering they’re already along the lowest cut boots on the market, I was astonished that I was able to feel stable skating like that in them.

I kept experimenting, rebaking, swapping tongues. I like them better with softer tongues, as I get better coupling between my feet and the skates. With the softest and slimmest tongue I have, and rebaked with the top three eyelets flared out, I can skate pretty comfortably on them with one the top eyelet unlaced; still get changing from the cuff like that.

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11 hours ago, smcgreg said:

how important ankle flexibility and range of motion is in the anterior/posterior plane for all aspects of skating, including footwork and agility

YES!!!! and people wonder why I preach about laces untied / lace free skating.

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18 minutes ago, Vet88 said:

YES!!!! and people wonder why I preach about laces untied / lace free skating.

Watching him today at practice was awesome.  Finally agile on his skates again and able to do what he used to do.  On top of it, good speed that carries over with the new boots... for whatever reason.

Of course, I agree with you, as I use 55Flex, or actually a leather knock off since they're out of business.  From a performance standpoint, there is a tradeoff though.  Too much flexibility and you lose power and explosiveness.  Too little and it compromises control and agility,...at least for him and me.  Finding that "sweet spot" is the trick.   He certainly can take advantage of the flexibility though, as he has TF9s down two eyelets.  That's crazy low lacing.

Edited by smcgreg
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2 hours ago, smcgreg said:

Too much flexibility and you lose power and explosiveness.  

Yes, you do as you are learning to skate this way. But the loss is caused by your foot mechanics, you are trying to skate as you walk (laced up locks the heel and even though the foot tries to lift thru the heel it can't). Untied, your heel lifts as it naturally wants to do but as you keep practising your stride mechanics optimise to a flat push with no heel lift and your speed and explosiveness returns. This is the hardest and last element to learn because of how BIG a change it is, it doesn't matter how long you have been skating you have to go thru this change because of how intrinsic it is to how you walk. In his later years, Darryl Evans played his NHL games with just the bottom 5 eyelets laced up. I only lace the bottom 4 and my lap, sprint and beep test times now are better than when I laced up, which is saying something as I'm now at the age where every year I just get slower....

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32 minutes ago, Vet88 said:

Yes, you do as you are learning to skate this way. But the loss is caused by your foot mechanics, you are trying to skate as you walk (laced up locks the heel and even though the foot tries to lift thru the heel it can't). Untied, your heel lifts as it naturally wants to do but as you keep practising your stride mechanics optimise to a flat push with no heel lift and your speed and explosiveness returns. This is the hardest and last element to learn because of how BIG a change it is, it doesn't matter how long you have been skating you have to go thru this change because of how intrinsic it is to how you walk. In his later years, Darryl Evans played his NHL games with just the bottom 5 eyelets laced up. I only lace the bottom 4 and my lap, sprint and beep test times now are better than when I laced up, which is saying something as I'm now at the age where every year I just get slower....

Hmm... I'll be honest, I don't know exactly what you're saying.  That being said, I'm not sure how you can dispute that a foot that is elevated several inches off the ground, balanced on a knife edge is not going to generate more power with a "tighter", stiffer system.  I suppose top end speed and even beep test times (a test of cardio vascular fitness) could be better, but raw acceleration/power, it's hard for me to envision. 

I think I've read your assertions about the importance of ankle strength and exercises to develop such, which would likely help, but in the end, stiffer boots and tighter connections should result in greater power transfer and everything else is an exercise to mitigate the compromise. In my son's case, he's a better, more agile player who is practically faster (I assume) in most facets with a lower lacing pattern, but has higher top end and raw acceleration laced higher. In the end, the agility and greater control with lower lacing makes him a better overall hockey player even given a bit of a compromise on speed. 

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1 hour ago, smcgreg said:

stiffer boots and tighter connections should result in greater power transfer and everything else is an exercise to mitigate the compromise.

This is true if you have any technical issues with the way you skate, the boot hides the flaws in the foot and ankle movements. If your technique is good enough and you have learnt to skate laces untied then the stiffness of the boot does not matter.

Let me put it this way, accelerating / exploding when skating unlaced is like learning to balance on your forefoot whilst standing on top of a nail whilst you attempt to drive full power downwards and transfer your body weight over the top of the nail. Your forefoot has to learn how to balance on the point of the blade AND control the deflection of the blade as you drive power downwards and forwards whilst remaining stable in the boot. This is why it takes so long to learn this, it's something the body has never done before, the closest I can think off is someone who is learning classical ballet and can do a full pointe. You come up on the forefoot, lose your balance and ergo can't apply any power. Your son struggles with this simply because he hasn't trained enough and learnt to do it. And I understand why skaters choose not to do this, it can be a huge hit on development time and performance and its just easier to lace up and not focus on this final piece of the puzzle.

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11 hours ago, Vet88 said:

This is true if you have any technical issues with the way you skate, the boot hides the flaws in the foot and ankle movements. If your technique is good enough and you have learnt to skate laces untied then the stiffness of the boot does not matter.

Let me put it this way, accelerating / exploding when skating unlaced is like learning to balance on your forefoot whilst standing on top of a nail whilst you attempt to drive full power downwards and transfer your body weight over the top of the nail. Your forefoot has to learn how to balance on the point of the blade AND control the deflection of the blade as you drive power downwards and forwards whilst remaining stable in the boot. This is why it takes so long to learn this, it's something the body has never done before, the closest I can think off is someone who is learning classical ballet and can do a full pointe. You come up on the forefoot, lose your balance and ergo can't apply any power. Your son struggles with this simply because he hasn't trained enough and learnt to do it. And I understand why skaters choose not to do this, it can be a huge hit on development time and performance and its just easier to lace up and not focus on this final piece of the puzzle.

OK, I see where you're coming from, but in contrast to the ballerina, there are several inches of holder and steel beneath the foot and knife edge interaction with the surface.  There is just no way that under many circumstances, the ankle joint is not going to be a "weak link" in that power transfer system.  To your point, there will be some situations where that "weak link" can be mitigated to some extent, but in the end, there will be many angles of attack between the blade and the ice where power transfer will be somewhat compromised.  That's just physics/biomechanics. 

Don't get me wrong, again, I think agility and maneuverability trump raw speed or explosiveness in terms of being a better hockey player, but power transfer is going to be compromised under some circumstances, there's no way around it. 

That being said, I agree that way too many skaters just go with the stiffest boot and lace up tight to cover up skating deficiencies.  I think we agree for the most part, we're just splitting some hairs on details. 

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 I think of it this way, if you are driving straight down through the footbed, transferring force directly through the blade with no torque, stiffness of the sidewalls does’t come into play.

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