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TRUE TF9/TF7 skates

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16 minutes ago, ThisisBen said:

The 6W's are a little too wide overall but I can't go smaller as my toes are at my comfort limit at the end of the toe cap.  The 6R's are too tight and my heels can't sit in the pocket properly causing my toes discomfort against the cap(both scenarios were after getting them baked).

I figured the 6.5R's would run slightly wider than the 6R's and I don't mind the bit of extra toe cap length as long as my heel is properly locked in.

The PHL's I've gone to are pretty hesitant about the idea of baking to try the skates without purchasing them. They only put the skates in for 5 minutes max and based on everything I've read on this thread, they aren't nearly warm or soft enough when they give them to me to put on. Doesn't feel any different from when I've baked and put on CCM/Bauer skates.

Sounds like you may not be getting a fair shake at these.  My understanding is True's policy is the skate MUST be baked in order to be properly tried on - similar to Makos (which VH helped design).  Although doesn't sound like you are too far off.  Believe they recommend 6-8 minutes, so they might be shorting you a few minutes of heat. 

How much discomfort are you experiencing with the smaller sizes?  Are the toes curled?  Or straight but just harder than you'd like against the cap?  They will continue to open up and break in as you skate in them.  So you might want to factor that in as well.  And there is also the variable of the tongues.  The felt gives me a much snugger fit than the pro style.  I'm probably going to stick with the felt. 

With the 30 day guarantee - worst case - get them baked properly - skate in them for a month and see if they work. 

Edited by krisdrum

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34 minutes ago, krisdrum said:

Sounds like you may not be getting a fair shake at these.  My understanding is True's policy is the skate MUST be baked in order to be properly tried on - similar to Makos (which VH helped design).  Although doesn't sound like you are too far off.  Believe they recommend 6-8 minutes, so they might be shorting you a few minutes of heat. 

How much discomfort are you experiencing with the smaller sizes?  Are the toes curled?  Or straight but just harder than you'd like against the cap?  They will continue to open up and break in as you skate in them.  So you might want to factor that in as well.  And there is also the variable of the tongues.  The felt gives me a much snugger fit than the pro style.  I'm probably going to stick with the felt. 

With the 30 day guarantee - worst case - get them baked properly - skate in them for a month and see if they work. 

Yeah, biggest hockey shop in Ontario is Pro Hockey Life. Great selection of products but very spotty employees. It seems that most of the people that work there are younger guys with limited knowledge and training.

Size 6 feels ideal in terms of length. R is too tight in the midfoot and upper? midfoot and didn't change much after baking. W felt pretty good but, taking into account the boot opening up more with time on them, I feel they would become too loose in the midfoot. I also couldn't get a proper heel lock on the W's(especially my smaller left heel) but that could probably be fixed with the wrap method or clamp method.

I can't go lower than 6 since my toes already brush against the cap and they don't offer W in the smaller sizes.

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4 hours ago, ThisisBen said:

Yeah, biggest hockey shop in Ontario is Pro Hockey Life. Great selection of products but very spotty employees. It seems that most of the people that work there are younger guys with limited knowledge and training.

Size 6 feels ideal in terms of length. R is too tight in the midfoot and upper? midfoot and didn't change much after baking. W felt pretty good but, taking into account the boot opening up more with time on them, I feel they would become too loose in the midfoot. I also couldn't get a proper heel lock on the W's(especially my smaller left heel) but that could probably be fixed with the wrap method or clamp method.

I can't go lower than 6 since my toes already brush against the cap and they don't offer W in the smaller sizes.

Ontario should have tonnes of hockey shops. Doesn't have to be a big one.  Phl is pretty much sport chek but sells only hockey. Maybe slightly more educated.... They are owned by FGL as well so.. go to an actual hockey shop. 

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Update:

Bought the 6W from another location and they feel more snug than the original 6W I tried(theory: was probably baked and tried on by a person with wider feet than me previously).  Heel lock could still be a bit better so I will try the clamp method and see how that goes.

I've gone on a few skates with them and though they feel great and are very responsive, I'm having trouble adjusting to how aggressively pitched forward they feel.  Anyone with experience know how I can make them more similar to my old skates?(size 263, Nexus 7000 Skates, whatever default profile is on the blades)

I also asked for a 5/8 sharpen and they dig a lot deeper than I'm used to. Is this a sharpening error? Or is this a natural thing with True skates and the Shift holder/runner?

Also, If I wanted to put Tuuks on my Trues, can I put 263's on them or do I have to stick with 254's?

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13 hours ago, ThisisBen said:

Update:

Bought the 6W from another location and they feel more snug than the original 6W I tried(theory: was probably baked and tried on by a person with wider feet than me previously).  Heel lock could still be a bit better so I will try the clamp method and see how that goes.

I've gone on a few skates with them and though they feel great and are very responsive, I'm having trouble adjusting to how aggressively pitched forward they feel.  Anyone with experience know how I can make them more similar to my old skates?(size 263, Nexus 7000 Skates, whatever default profile is on the blades)

I also asked for a 5/8 sharpen and they dig a lot deeper than I'm used to. Is this a sharpening error? Or is this a natural thing with True skates and the Shift holder/runner?

Also, If I wanted to put Tuuks on my Trues, can I put 263's on them or do I have to stick with 254's?

You can put the 263 if you want. Any reputable hockey shop should be able to. 

It's always been recommended to go a hollow less with trues bc of the feeling of increased bite. This probably has more to do with the responsiveness of the skate than anything. 

You can change the pitch or the skate by profiling or shims or swapping holders back to what you're used to. 

Edited by Sniper9
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8 hours ago, Sniper9 said:

You can put the 263 if you want. Any reputable hockey shop should be able to. 

It's always been recommended to go a hollow less with trues bc of the feeling of increased bite. This probably has more to do with the responsiveness of the skate than anything. 

You can't change the pitch or the skate by profiling or shims or swapping holders back to what you're used to. 

I think @Sniper9 means "can" in that last sentence.  I'd probably look at profiling your blades before swapping hardware or adding shims.   

To echo his statement - I switched from my standard 5/8" hollow to enjoying a 7/8" hollow on my Trues.  Happened to be the wheel my buddy had in his machine, so I figured why not give it a try.  Skated on it twice so far and still adjusting, but am liking the lack of bite.  Will probably stick with it.  The Trues definitely bite harder.  My nephew who is in custom Trues has moved to a 1 3/8" hollow and loves it. 

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On 3/11/2022 at 5:13 AM, ThisisBen said:

Update:

Bought the 6W from another location and they feel more snug than the original 6W I tried(theory: was probably baked and tried on by a person with wider feet than me previously).  Heel lock could still be a bit better so I will try the clamp method and see how that goes.

I've gone on a few skates with them and though they feel great and are very responsive, I'm having trouble adjusting to how aggressively pitched forward they feel.  Anyone with experience know how I can make them more similar to my old skates?(size 263, Nexus 7000 Skates, whatever default profile is on the blades)

I also asked for a 5/8 sharpen and they dig a lot deeper than I'm used to. Is this a sharpening error? Or is this a natural thing with True skates and the Shift holder/runner?

Also, If I wanted to put Tuuks on my Trues, can I put 263's on them or do I have to stick with 254's?

A tight fitting, stiff skate gives you more bite, I made the same experience with my trues. It will take you at least 10h on the ice to adjust to such a major change. Go to a shallower hollow(3/4") and have fun with your new skates. I didn't like the stock profile and made a very good experience with an unmodified  Quad XS profile on my 254mm 6.5 TF7, excellent agility and good stability. 

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On 3/12/2022 at 9:39 PM, hockeydad3 said:

It will take you at least 10h on the ice to adjust to such a major change.

I meant adjusting to a completely different skate.

The skates need more than 20h to break in and a rebake with saran. You could try a different profile. And if you you aren't satisfied with your skates after this procedures it's time to think about an exchange of the holders. 

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5 hours ago, hockeydad3 said:

I meant adjusting to a completely different skate.

The skates need more than 20h to break in and a rebake with saran. You could try a different profile. And if you you aren't satisfied with your skates after this procedures it's time to think about an exchange of the holders. 

For me I didn't need much of an adjustment with true skates when I went from my Bauer one100s years ago. They were so comfortable and responsive. I did however get them when they came with the step vh holders and had the steel profiled to the same profile as my old skates. 

 

 

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7 hours ago, hockeydad3 said:

I meant adjusting to a completely different skate.

The skates need more than 20h to break in and a rebake with saran. You could try a different profile. And if you you aren't satisfied with your skates after this procedures it's time to think about an exchange of the holders. 

At some point the logical conclusion has to be drawn that these might not be the right skates for people who want to re-engineer the entire skate to match the feel of a previous owned skate. Easy enough to go back to what they had before and it's not that difficult to find second hand skates that have been hardly used, if you have the patience to search for them.

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13 hours ago, hockeydad3 said:

I meant adjusting to a completely different skate.

The skates need more than 20h to break in and a rebake with saran. You could try a different profile. And if you you aren't satisfied with your skates after this procedures it's time to think about an exchange of the holders. 

Oof. I suppose I should consider myself lucky that I've never had to spend 20 hours to break in properly fitting skates. Coming from a decade of various Bauers into Trues, the only thing I did was swap holders and bake them. First skate onward they felt like a dream. Only had one minor issue fixing a hot spot on the inner arch, but beyond that True skates have been amazing for my feet

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I didn't say that breaking them in was painful. But the padding and the tongues adapted to my feet and loosened up the fit. After the rebake the fit was perfect. 

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1 hour ago, Fonetiks007 said:

I need help. I usually wear 8.5 D (fit2) in Bauer Vapors. What size should I get in True TF9’s? 8 or 7.5? 

You need to try them on. If necessary, order a few sizes, try them at home, and keep the one that’s so tight you almost can’t get your foot in. These loosen up with a little use. You’ll get more comfort in the long run and better performance by going as snug as possible.

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Have a week or so on my tf9s, and I am wondering if I didn't heat them up enough in the first bake. The eyelets are not nearly as wrapped and form fitting as many others look, and I have to really crank the laces in order to get a snug fit and heel lock. I also have quite a few hot spots that get pretty uncomfortable after an hour of skating. Toes are up against the cap and the width is good, so I'm pretty sure I'm in the right size. 

I have to bake them at home, (not many hockey shops in Hawaii) so I did 6 minutes at 180 in a conventional oven. Used the luggage wrap method and went as tight as possible. It made the skate tighter (narrower) but didn't pull the eyelets around the tongue. They seemed pretty warm but still much stiffer than I remember my previous skates being coming out of a pro shop oven. It is a brand new oven and has a convection setting, so I am wondering if that would be better. Also if I can leave them in longer and/or go hotter.

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Yes, use the convection setting. The skate ovens at the store are smaller convection ovens. Preheat to 200 Fahrenheit and bake the skates one at a time for 10 minutes. You can put a damp tea towel on a pizza tray and then put the skates on that. Flip them at the 5 minute mark to ensure they're evenly heated. 

6 minutes at 180 isn't long enough or hot enough. Obviously having access to a shop with a proper oven is ideal, but I have baked Kor, Mako and True skates at home with the convection setting successfully. I have also had Kors and Makos baked at a shop and the results felt the same to my feet. 

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So I made an "impulse" buy, and bought a pair of TF7's the other day, and played in them for the first time last night. 

A little background- I'll be 45 years old later this year. I've played hockey since I was 5. I'd say skating is the strongest aspect of my game, and always has been. 

I had just bought a pair of FT4 Pro's back in January, to replace my beat AS1 Super Tacks. I've always been a CCM guy when it comes to skates. The exception being a few pairs of Reeboks throughout the years.  CCM skates (skates only) are the only brand of hockey equipment/gear that I've been mostly loyal to my entire life. (Still remember getting fitted for my Super Tacks that I paid for with my own paper route money back before middle school hockey season in the late 80s).

I have zero issues with the FT4 Pro's. It's a great skate, that I've really grown to like how they feel and perform. The purchase of the TF7's have nothing to do with needing new skates or any issues with the FT4's. As I said- the TF7 were a total impulse buy.

I essentially walked out of the store with senior TF7's for a hair under $200.00 after all discounts were applied. I figured at that price, if I didn't like them, or they didnt work for me, I could pretty easily recoup my money. 

So, I had them baked per the instructions in store. I opted not to do the wrap in store right then and there. It was suggested that I do the initial bake, then try them out a few times.  Then if I needed to go back for another bake, or a bake and a wrap if it were needed, we could do that. The skates were also hand sharpened to my preferred 1/2". I'm also down half a size in the True skates. I'm a 10 in most CCM models. In the Trues, my foot floated in the 10. Was way too tight through the mid foot in both a 9 and 9 wide. 9.5 felt the best, and that's where I ended up.

Skates seemed to bake great. The wrap was pretty solid. Heel was completely locked in. Decent volume. In store I was very pleased with how they felt after the bake. So I pulled the trigger.

I tried them on a few times around the house on Saturday and Sunday. Like many of you, it's an adjustment trying to figure out the best way to get them on and off. As well as lacing the top two eyelets again, as I need to undo them entirely to even think about getting the skate off. It's tough with the tongue position to lace the last few eyelets, even with the skate off.

Both of these can be very time consuming until you get more used to the most effective ways of getting the skates on/off and lacing them. I'm glad I did a few practice runs before heading to the rink. 

The only thing I found concerning at this point was that my pinky toe on my left foot was rubbing up against that rubber bumper piece in the toe box of the left skate (Note- I was not in actual skate socks). I felt inside the skate, and felt like this was something I could remove altogether (if needed), or at the very least use a Dremel and sort of clean out some space right there. So that was one thing I wanted to keep an eye on during my first skate. 

Cut to my first skate in them. Standard pickup with friends last night. Most played college hockey in some form, so while we are older, it's still a pretty good skate, with a good pace. 

After I got them on, the first thing I noticed was that little rubber piece that was rubbing my pinky toe wasn't as noticeable. This continued to feel fine throughout the skate, and was no longer a concern I had by the end. 

The boot felt great throughout the entire hour and a half skate. I don't think I've ever just put on a pair of skates that the boot was this comfortable, and I got such good heel lock essentially right out of the gate. Kinda crazy considering even at MSRP this skate is around 1/3 the cost of the skates I had just purchased a few months prior, and fresh out of the box- the True's felt better.

The issue though- was actually skating in them. The absolute best way I can describe it was, I felt like I was in goalie skates. I know that doesn't make a ton of sense, I just felt like the steel felt very "long", and flat. It definitely had an edge, but just felt way off.

I was not comfortable with anything other than straight-line acceleration. I understand that new skates take time to get used to, it's just I felt like Bambi out there at times. Specifically on quick/hard stops, and crossing over. It's the worst I've skated in new skates in a very long time.

So this is something I need to try and understand, and alleviate. A few variables I'm considering are that I've been on 287 CCM holders for what feels like forever now. My TF7'S have a 280 holder. 

Second, I've been using a 1/2" ring on the Sparx Machine I own for over 5 years now. The sharpening I got in store was by hand, by a very reputable Sharpener here in MA. However, these felt soooo much sharper and had way more bite it seemed than I've ever experienced prior. 

So I'm going to try and start small to fix these issues. Easiest thing is to try a different sharpening. Maybe go down to a 5/8 or something. I'll try different things. Maybe put my Superfeet in them.  I'm just hopefull I won't have to reach the point where a complete holder and steel swap to CCM holders with Step is what's needed to fix this. 

Anyhow, apologies for the long and all over the place post. My initial impressions are you get an absolute ton of value at this price point if you can make these skates work for you. Hoping I can get there. 

 

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4 hours ago, OzziesDad said:

Like many of you, it's an adjustment trying to figure out the best way to get them on and off. As well as lacing the top two eyelets again, as I need to undo them entirely to even think about getting the skate off. It's tough with the tongue position to lace the last few eyelets, even with the skate off.

For the top two eyelets, thread the laces through the eyelets behind the tongue and then pull the laces over. It's much easier that way. Trying to thread the laces through the eyelets with the lace in front of the tongue is really tough. 

As for the feel issue, I only have TF9s converted to roller, so I don't know how they feel on ice, but I know most people that go from another brand to True ice skates end up having to go with a shallower hollow; so, that's definitely a good starting point. If the boots felt comfortable, I personally wouldn't change the footbed. I'd start with the hollow and if that didn't fix it, I'd consider getting them profiled.

Edited by althoma1
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I also think the hollow is the right place to start.  I dropped from my standard 5/8 (even 9/16 sometimes) to 7/8 with very little adjustment and no loss of control and the skates are much easier to "slide out" now, but still plenty grippy when I need/want it.  My nephew who is in custom Trues went all the way to a 1 3/8 cut and loves it.  Granted his edge work is impeccable, but I think that also says something about how effectively the boot transfers body movement into the ice.  

I was in Ribcor 76Ks just prior to getting the Trues and I didn't feel much of a change pitch-wise.  But I didn't go down a runner size in the Trues. 

And I second the "behind the tongue" lacing approach for the top 1-2 eyelets.  So much easier than trying to cram it through in front of the tongue.  I'm surprised the shop you bought them from did not give you this tip at purchase. 

Edited by krisdrum
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6 hours ago, OzziesDad said:

So I made an "impulse" buy, and bought a pair of TF7's the other day, and played in them for the first time last night. 

A little background- I'll be 45 years old later this year. I've played hockey since I was 5. I'd say skating is the strongest aspect of my game, and always has been. 

I had just bought a pair of FT4 Pro's back in January, to replace my beat AS1 Super Tacks. I've always been a CCM guy when it comes to skates. The exception being a few pairs of Reeboks throughout the years.  CCM skates (skates only) are the only brand of hockey equipment/gear that I've been mostly loyal to my entire life. (Still remember getting fitted for my Super Tacks that I paid for with my own paper route money back before middle school hockey season in the late 80s).

I have zero issues with the FT4 Pro's. It's a great skate, that I've really grown to like how they feel and perform. The purchase of the TF7's have nothing to do with needing new skates or any issues with the FT4's. As I said- the TF7 were a total impulse buy.

I essentially walked out of the store with senior TF7's for a hair under $200.00 after all discounts were applied. I figured at that price, if I didn't like them, or they didnt work for me, I could pretty easily recoup my money. 

So, I had them baked per the instructions in store. I opted not to do the wrap in store right then and there. It was suggested that I do the initial bake, then try them out a few times.  Then if I needed to go back for another bake, or a bake and a wrap if it were needed, we could do that. The skates were also hand sharpened to my preferred 1/2". I'm also down half a size in the True skates. I'm a 10 in most CCM models. In the Trues, my foot floated in the 10. Was way too tight through the mid foot in both a 9 and 9 wide. 9.5 felt the best, and that's where I ended up.

Skates seemed to bake great. The wrap was pretty solid. Heel was completely locked in. Decent volume. In store I was very pleased with how they felt after the bake. So I pulled the trigger.

I tried them on a few times around the house on Saturday and Sunday. Like many of you, it's an adjustment trying to figure out the best way to get them on and off. As well as lacing the top two eyelets again, as I need to undo them entirely to even think about getting the skate off. It's tough with the tongue position to lace the last few eyelets, even with the skate off.

Both of these can be very time consuming until you get more used to the most effective ways of getting the skates on/off and lacing them. I'm glad I did a few practice runs before heading to the rink. 

The only thing I found concerning at this point was that my pinky toe on my left foot was rubbing up against that rubber bumper piece in the toe box of the left skate (Note- I was not in actual skate socks). I felt inside the skate, and felt like this was something I could remove altogether (if needed), or at the very least use a Dremel and sort of clean out some space right there. So that was one thing I wanted to keep an eye on during my first skate. 

Cut to my first skate in them. Standard pickup with friends last night. Most played college hockey in some form, so while we are older, it's still a pretty good skate, with a good pace. 

After I got them on, the first thing I noticed was that little rubber piece that was rubbing my pinky toe wasn't as noticeable. This continued to feel fine throughout the skate, and was no longer a concern I had by the end. 

The boot felt great throughout the entire hour and a half skate. I don't think I've ever just put on a pair of skates that the boot was this comfortable, and I got such good heel lock essentially right out of the gate. Kinda crazy considering even at MSRP this skate is around 1/3 the cost of the skates I had just purchased a few months prior, and fresh out of the box- the True's felt better.

The issue though- was actually skating in them. The absolute best way I can describe it was, I felt like I was in goalie skates. I know that doesn't make a ton of sense, I just felt like the steel felt very "long", and flat. It definitely had an edge, but just felt way off.

I was not comfortable with anything other than straight-line acceleration. I understand that new skates take time to get used to, it's just I felt like Bambi out there at times. Specifically on quick/hard stops, and crossing over. It's the worst I've skated in new skates in a very long time.

So this is something I need to try and understand, and alleviate. A few variables I'm considering are that I've been on 287 CCM holders for what feels like forever now. My TF7'S have a 280 holder. 

Second, I've been using a 1/2" ring on the Sparx Machine I own for over 5 years now. The sharpening I got in store was by hand, by a very reputable Sharpener here in MA. However, these felt soooo much sharper and had way more bite it seemed than I've ever experienced prior. 

So I'm going to try and start small to fix these issues. Easiest thing is to try a different sharpening. Maybe go down to a 5/8 or something. I'll try different things. Maybe put my Superfeet in them.  I'm just hopefull I won't have to reach the point where a complete holder and steel swap to CCM holders with Step is what's needed to fix this. 

Anyhow, apologies for the long and all over the place post. My initial impressions are you get an absolute ton of value at this price point if you can make these skates work for you. Hoping I can get there. 

 

That's why I don't want to get retail trues. Going down half a size for me would put me in a smaller holder. The money I'd spend on swapping holders to ccm xs ones and upgrading to a felt tongue (for tf9) I would prefer to get customs and not have excess holes on the sole of the boot too. But that's just me. 

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Use thinner and longer non waxed laces(Elite Prolace or similar). And go to a shallower hollow(around 3/4").

Edited by hockeydad3
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Howdy,

So... Is this ~$200 for TF7 deal available to anyone else?

🙂

I've been nothing but happy with my TF7's.  And that's independent of the price.  Factor in the price and they're a GREAT value if they work for your feet.

Mark

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@OzziesDadYou’re dealing with going down a holder size, the pitch/height of the true holder, & whatever radius is on them.

i went from true customs w/ 272 tuuks  to retail tf9 with a 263 true holder. I stuck it out on the true holder and went with a pro sharp elipse profile at 5/8, took about 2 skates to feel completely comfortable and I haven’t looked back.
 

By all means you could swap out the holder since you’re in the trues for so little money wise. This would also make most sense if you plan on going back and forth with them and your ccm. Otherwise I’d suggest sticking it out on the true holder, you just might like it.

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Just a follow up, I went back to my FT4's for a game on Monday. Then I went back to the TF7's for pickup last night. 

I dropped down from the 1/2" ROH, to a 5/8", and it made a HUGE difference. It pretty much alleviated most of my concerns in my previous post. Skating felt much more natural and normal (even in new skates).

I'm really enjoying how comfortable these skates are. I'm seeing zero need for a second bake, or wrap. We will see if the difference in holder size becomes a detriment.

From this point, I'll do another 12-15 skates on them before formulating a concrete opinion on them. However, so far, so good.

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